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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Commercial Electrician in Charleston, SC

If you own a business, you should already know that at some point, you will need to hire an electrician in Charleston to fix electrical issues and maintain your property's wiring systems. Unfortunately, many people forego certified, experienced electricians to save money. The reality is, trying to fix an electrical issue in your business is no small task and often costs more money than hiring a professional. Working with electricity can be dangerous to your property and, more importantly, your health.

It might seem like a good idea to try a DIY approach or call your "do it all" local handyman, but going pro will save you time and money when it comes to serious projects like thermal imaging and three-phase panel installations. Think about it: why spend money buying expensive supplies and countless hours watching electrical repair videos when there's a good chance you'll need professional help in the end? Many DIY electricians have good intentions but often end up damaging electrical systems worse than before.

At Engineered Electrical Solutions, we get the job done right the first time, so you can focus on enjoying running your business while we fix your electrical problem. We bring the same level of quality and reliability to every job we perform, whether it's a routine safety inspection or an entire commercial rewiring project. Unlike some electricians in South Carolina, we go above and beyond to ensure our customers are safe and satisfied with our work. We pride ourselves on keeping customers informed throughout their electrical job and follow up on our projects to make sure our fixes stick.

Service Areas

At the end of the day, excellent customer care is what we strive to achieve. We do so by providing the highest quality commercial services at affordable prices, all year long. Here are just a few reasons why Lowcountry residents trust Engineered Electrical Solutions:

  • We Have Decades of Electrical Repair Experience
  • We Offer Customer-Centric Electrical Services
  • We Treat Your Property Like Our Own
  • Our Electricians Provide Quality, Efficient Work
  • We Are Licensed, Bonded, and Insured Electricians in South Carolina
  • Commercial Electrician Services
  • Industrial Electrician Services

If you're looking for the very best electrician in South Carolina, put down the pen and paper and look no further than Engineered Electrical Solutions. Keep reading to learn more about some of our most popular services.

Commercial Electrician Charleston, SC

Your Trustworthy Commercial Electrician in Charleston

Having a reliable electrician on hand that you can trust with electrical repairs is of utmost importance when you own a business in South Carolina. For years, Engineered Electrical Solutions has provided business owners with the most effective electrical repair and installation services in the Lowcountry. Our team is adept at assisting businesses of all sizes, from small "mom and pop" shops to industrial plants and everything in between.

 Commercial Electrical Charleston, SC

We offer a wide range of electrical services, from electrical panel installation and business rewiring to transformer installation and thermal imaging. Modern businesses count on energy-efficient electricity to help run their day-to-day operations. If you need your electrical systems to run smoothly so you can stay focused on building your business, count on Engineered Electrical Solutions to be there when you need us the most.

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Transformer Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment

Why is Hiring a Commercial Electrician in Charleston, SC, a Good Idea?

As a business owner, you know first-hand that closing your doors costs money, time, and possibly your clients. That's why, when you have an electrical issue that must be remedied, you need quick, cost-efficient help so you can keep running your business. But trusting the job of a trained electrician in the hands of an amateur can be a big mistake.

Sure, your uncle may know how to flip a few switches on the breaker in your home, but serving a commercial business is an entirely different animal. In fact, trusting your company's electrical needs to just anyone can end up costing you more in the long run. Here are just a few of the most important reasons to consider hiring an experienced commercial electrical contractor.

 Electrician Near Me Charleston, SC

Adherence to South Carolina Electrical Codes

Did you know there is a litany of regulations and codes you must follow when servicing electrical components in a commercial setting? From remodels to maintenance, a knowledgeable electrician will know these codes in and out. If they don't, they've got the reference material and support to ensure their work is up to standard. Taking the time to hire a commercial electrical company with vetted technicians means you don't have to worry about legal fines and reprimands for not adhering to regulations associated with common services like commercial lighting installations and upgrades.

 Electrician Charleston, SC

Specialized Skills and Advanced Training

In general, a commercial electrical contractor in Charleston, SC, must undergo extensive training and pass more tests in order to practice their trade in South Carolina. Like their counterparts in the residential electrical business, they must both pass exams and complete apprenticeships. But commercial electricians have more in-depth training. They must also prove their knowledge of the National Electrical Code, or NEC, which encompasses safety procedures and building codes in the U.S. The advanced training that commercial electricians complete sets the foundation for services such as:

 Electrical Repair Charleston, SC
  • Commercial Electrical Panel Maintenance and Replacement
  • Emergency Electrical Services for Businesses, Warehouses, Facilities, Etc.
  • Commercial Wiring and Electrical Component Installation
  • Commercial Retrofits
  • Commercial Renovations, Remodels, and Electrical for New Construction
  • Much More

When you break it down to the basics, commercial electricians in the Lowcountry require more experience because of factors like safety, complexity, and reliability. It's not unusual for a contractor to complete over 4,000 hours of on-the-job experience, to learn about complicated topics like voltage and phase balancing, control systems, and phase diagrams.

Avoid Electrical Hazards

If you're like most people, you hire professionals like corporate lawyers, helicopter pilots, and commercial electricians to handle the things you don't have the skills to do yourself. Because, if we're being honest, many services provided by commercial electrical contractors are dangerous and even downright deadly. While you can find "How-To" articles that insist that this type of work is simple, taking on an electrical project for your business can have catastrophic consequences - both for your business and for the family you're supporting.

Hiring a commercial electrician for your business safeguards you, your employees, and your business. That's because they're trained to spot commercial electrical hazards and have the tools to fix the problem correctly and according to South Carolina regulations.

 Electrical Panel Installation Charleston, SC
 Electrical Safety Inspection Charleston, SC

Minimize Cost

Some business owners make it a point to hire non-professionals to handle their electrical work, thinking they'll save money in the long run. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth. Cutting corners and hiring unlicensed friends or family members creates hazards that will set your company back much more than it would to hire a qualified commercial electrician. Mistakes are costly and often end up with you having to close your business while they're corrected. This downtime will affect your ability to do business and may even affect your brand loyalty and customer base.

5 Tips for Lowering Your Commercial Energy Costs

Energy mismanagement - it's one of the most common ways that businesses lose unnecessary money every year. Though every business in South Carolina will eventually face some sort of energy waste, that doesn't mean you have to settle for expenses you can prevent. At Engineered Electrical Solutions, we're all about supporting our fellow business owners. To help you reduce electrical costs, follow these five tips.

light
01

Upgrade Your Lights

In terms of low-cost solutions, this one is among the best. If you've been using incandescent bulbs throughout your business, try installing compact fluorescents instead. They can last 9x longer and save you money over time. While you're at it, remove any incandescent lights powering exit signs in your building. Replace them with LED alternatives.

Lighting Control
02

Efficient Lighting Control Plans

Did you grow up in a household where your mom or dad constantly reminded you to turn off the lights when you're done in a room? That same basic principle holds true here. If lights are left on unnecessarily, be sure they're turned off before closing for the day. If you find that doesn't help, you may need to develop a shift-based system to turn off lights. Our team of commercial electricians for your business in cityname, state, have the expertise to help you establish a system to lower energy waste without affecting your company's productivity.

HVAC Maintenance
03

Perform HVAC Maintenance

According to the Small Business Administration, HVAC use accounts for nearly 40% of energy use in commercial buildings. It's clear, then, that poor-performing HVAC systems can rack up monthly energy costs quickly. To prevent this from getting out of control, make sure your AC and heating units are well-maintained and free of expensive issues. You may want to also consider installing programmable thermostats, which can automatically control the temperature settings on your property to help maximize your energy savings.

Insulate
04

Insulate

The EPA states that keeping your commercial building properly insulated can save you as much as 10% on your energy bill. Don't settle for obvious areas like walls and windows. Be sure your electrical outlets, pipes, and HVAC ducts are properly insulated too.

Energy Management
05

Consider an Energy Management System

At Engineered Electrical Solutions, we can provide you with an energy audit for your business that pinpoints areas of energy waste and how those areas can be improved. Having an electrical assessment is a great idea for any business owner, especially if you have a storefront where customers come and go because it can help lower your overall operational costs.

Common Commercial Electrical Issues

Commercial and industrial-sized buildings are large and complex by the nature of their construction. By proxy, commercial buildings have complicated wiring and electrical systems. Electrical work in the commercial market is best left to experienced, licensed professionals. If you're looking for the very best commercial electricians in Metro Charleston, Engineered Electrical Solutions is here to serve you.

We have completed hundreds of commercial electrician projects for companies like Blue Oyster Restaurant, Shell Gas Stations, Flex Warehouses, Dentist Offices, and many more. With the most up-to-date equipment and years of professional experience, our team is ready to tackle your electrical problem, no matter how large.

 Electrical Safety Upgrades Charleston, SC

Here are just a few of the common electrical issues that we solve for Lowcountry business owners:

 Electrical Service Upgrades Charleston, SC

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

 Electrician For My Business Charleston, SC

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

 Safety Inspection Charleston, SC

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Charleston: What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than other wiring and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from Call to Technician

Engineered Electrical Solutions has built its reputation on a simple formula: give our customers the highest-quality commercial electrical services, the most helpful customer service, and the best prices available in town.

As a veteran-owned and operated business, we take pride in good old-fashioned hard work and dedication to our craft. No upselling. No misleading fine print. Only quality electrical work and reliable commercial electricians in Charleston, SC.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of a commercial electrician for your business or organization, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

phone-number843-735-2275

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Latest News in Charleston, SC

In West Ashley, City Council contenders want more from City Hall as Election Day nears

Battle for District 9 In West Ashley, City Council contenders want more from City Hall as Election Day nearsFive candidates are vying for the seat Councilman Peter Shahid...

Battle for District 9

In West Ashley, City Council contenders want more from City Hall as Election Day nears

Five candidates are vying for the seat Councilman Peter Shahid vacated after launching his mayoral bid. The victor will represent District 9, which encompasses a development project some say symbolizes how investment in West Ashley has fallen to the wayside. Read moreIn West Ashley, City Council contenders want more from City Hall as Election Day nears

Health

Burnout and poor mental health among health care workers has reached “crisis levels,” CDC officials said after a recent survey found they suffered more during the pandemic. Charleston health systems say they are already taking it on.

The Atlanta-based retail chain has one other store in the Charleston area and two others in South Carolina.

Converted jail to anchor residential development in downtown Beaufort

Following hit to head, CCU’s Grayson McCall released from hospital; scans are ‘very positive’

Keurig Dr. Pepper announces $100M expansion, 250 new jobs in Spartanburg County

Boeing boosting production of its SC-built Dreamliner jets to 5 per month as demand soars

Shrimp and grits return to former Hominy Grill space. Now, they’re topped with feta.

In Greenville, Tim Scott criticizes pro-Palestine rallies on college campuses

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Hidden on Church Street, Le Chambertin offers one of the top cafe settings in Charleston

The owner of Macaroon Boutique and Le Chambertin in Charleston cooked at Les Halles, the famed restaurant that more than a million people have read about in Anthony Bourdain’...

The owner of Macaroon Boutique and Le Chambertin in Charleston cooked at Les Halles, the famed restaurant that more than a million people have read about in Anthony Bourdain’s bestselling book, “Kitchen Confidential.”

Hailing from France, Fabrice Rizzo ran the pastry programs at restaurants across New York City and later held an executive position within Union Square Hospitality Group. He worked his way up in that company, led by restaurateur Danny Meyer, who brought Eleven Madison Park, Union Square Cafe and Gramercy Tavern to New York City and Shake Shack to countries around the world.

For those who have not kept up with New York City restaurant news, Rizzo’s resume is impressive.

The French chef will rush through this chapter of his life story to get to the part where he moves to the South. He started in Destin, Fla., where he owned two bakeries, before coming to Charleston to open Macaroon Boutique at 45 John St. in 2010.

More than a decade later, Rizzo and his wife Fabienne Doco opened Le Chambertin at 113 Church St. on their wedding anniversary in February 2021. Located in the space previously occupied by Fuschia Tea Emporium, Le Chambertin debuted with less fanfare than some other popular daytime cafes in Charleston.

Open Tuesday through Sunday, Le Chambertin does not amass the same line as nearby Harken Cafe, where I’ll sometimes stop for morning coffee. While there are plenty of photogenic savory and sweet bites, the French bakery is not filled with Instagramming tourists snapping pictures of the décor and Lamill coffee drinks like they do at Sorelle Mercato, which opened 300 feet away from Le Chambertin in February 2022.

WEST ASHLEY — Brent Sweatman has played a role in restaurant openings in various capacities during his long Charleston food and beverage career. From running the bar at The Rarebit to helping craft the drink menu at all-vegan Neon Tiger, Sweatman has had an impact on several Charleston establishments, particularly those that have served his house-made sodas.

Now, fans of Sweatman’s ginger beer and tonic can get those, plus a handful of new creations, at Sweatman’s Garden, now open at 90 Folly Road in the Earth Fare supermarket-anchored South Windermere Shopping Center.

Owned by Sweatman and his wife Danielle, Sweatman’s Garden is housed in the former site of Florence’s Lowcountry Kitchen, which closed in September 2022.

The space is darker and moodier than in its previous Southern-themed iteration, with live plants covering an entire wall to the right. Behind the bar, employees are serving Sweatman’s root beer, habanero fresco, natural cola and more. For $5, patrons can add a house or cannabis spirit to their drink.

When served straight, the sodas are meant to be a healthier, all-natural alternative to a cocktail or sugary commercial pop.

“I get pretty geeky when it comes to herbs and spices,” Brent Sweatman said. “We always try to do things that are a little bit unique or take sodas that you know and love and show them to you the right way.”

The small food menu features charcuterie boards, garlic hummus, cheese and fondue, served sweet and savory. Pots of cheese and chocolate fondues come with chips, bread, vegetables and other items for dipping.

‘Good Catch Seafood Connection’ fights food insecurity in the Lowcountry

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Aquarium has launched a new initiative called “Good Catch Seafood Connection.”Despite the close proximity to water and the seafood within it, many South Carolinians experience food insecurity.This motivated the aquarium to team up with other organizations to create a solution that would offer people living in the Lowcountry greater access to the ocean bounty and alleviate the growing challenges of choosing local and sustainable seafood.According to a study by the U...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Aquarium has launched a new initiative called “Good Catch Seafood Connection.”

Despite the close proximity to water and the seafood within it, many South Carolinians experience food insecurity.

This motivated the aquarium to team up with other organizations to create a solution that would offer people living in the Lowcountry greater access to the ocean bounty and alleviate the growing challenges of choosing local and sustainable seafood.

According to a study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, South Carolina ranks as the eighth highest food-insecure state in the nation, with 12.6% of the state’s residents experiencing food insecurity.

Each month the progam will purchase 50 pounds of shrimp and 110 pounds of gutted and headed swordfish from the local family-owned business Cherry Point Seafood.

The seafood will then be dropped off at the nonprofit One80 Place where their chefs and trainees will prepare the food.

The culinary institute of Charleston at Trident Tech will also receive a delivery and the students will filet and package the food to deliver it to the Lowcountry Food Bank for their Meals on Wheels program.

Together these organizations will feed between 500 to 550 food insecure people.

Dr. Sara McDonald, the Director of Conservation for SC Aquarium, explained why the Lowcountry faces food insecurity challenges despite a close proximity to the water.

“Charleston and throughout out South Carolina in which the water is contaminated, and the fish are contaminated. The other thing is people have lost access to the water there’s a lot of development that’s happening and the last thing is cost because we’re going through a bit of a crisis right now, we’re experiencing a glut of very cheap imported shrimp that is currently flooding the market,” McDonald said.

Though the program is at its beginning stages there has been talk about the long-term vision for the program.

“This is just a pilot project. We want to make this a permanent part of our good catch program, so we are working with our board of directors and with our advancement team to find funding ways to not only make this permanent and find a sustainable way to fund it but also, we want to expand it”, McDonald said.

Officials at the aquarium hope this initiative will encourage the community and businesses to support local shrimpers and fishermen.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

CCSD Board of Trustees meet for first regular meeting since controversial September meeting

CHARLESTON, S.C (WCBD) – The Charleston County School District Board of Trustees met on Monday for their first regular meeting since their controversial September 25th meeting.A long list of speakers waited their turn to address the board of trustees during the public comment section.“You were called out for your failure to be specific with your agenda to investigate and suspend Dr. Gallien. You cleaned it up with a do-over vote, but unfortunately, this is part of a pattern of secrecy and contempt for the...

CHARLESTON, S.C (WCBD) – The Charleston County School District Board of Trustees met on Monday for their first regular meeting since their controversial September 25th meeting.

A long list of speakers waited their turn to address the board of trustees during the public comment section.

“You were called out for your failure to be specific with your agenda to investigate and suspend Dr. Gallien. You cleaned it up with a do-over vote, but unfortunately, this is part of a pattern of secrecy and contempt for the public,” said one speaker.

Of the public comment section participants were a few members of the Health Advisory Committee who were apparently removed from their positions last month before their terms were up. They filed a lawsuit against Board Chair Pam McKinney, Trustees Carlotte Bailey, Keith Grybowski, Ed Kelley, Leah Whatley, and the Charleston County School District.

“Clearly your recent decision to dismantle the Health Advisory Committee is an attempt to extinguish the current sex ed curriculum. Today students receive data driven information that is medically accurate, inclusive, and comprehensive. The curriculum was unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees in July 2020,” said Dr. Lisa Ross, a plaintiff in the lawsuit and a former member of the committee.

Chaos broke out multiple times during the meeting, including when Moms for Liberty’s Tara Wood was at the podium. She is the chair of the Charleston County chapter of the organization which is known for backing a majority of the board.

“This is unacceptable, its freedom of speech. I have a right. I have a child in CCSD, I have a right to speak,” Wood said to the board.

Later in the meeting, Trustee Courtney Waters attempted to have Bailey removed from her leadership positions and censored in response to an alleged recording of the trustee making controversial comments.

“It’s actually our duty, constitutionally, to make sure that we are governing apart from our religious beliefs. I am a member of a church, I do hold religious beliefs, but I try very hard to separate that from the business of this board, and for that reason I make this motion,” said Waters.

Kelley offered a different opinion on the matter.

“I have certainly not heard anything and so I’ve been told, the recording that has circulated, social media functionally, has been altered and or doctored,” said Kelley.

The action did not pass. The board later voted 5-4 to reconsider the Health Advisory Committee vote taken last month during the November 13th meeting.

Earlier in the meeting the board received an update on the investigation into Superintendent Dr. Eric Gallien, who is on paid administrative leave. The board chair said the attorney planned to have the report completed by the end of October.

Charleston County Council votes to preserve law protecting settlement communities

After weeks of deliberation and debate that pitted real estate developers against preservationists, Charleston County Council on Oct. 24 decided against amending a law designed to protect historic settlement communities from suburban sprawl.Three members voted in favor of the amendments, while five voted against. One member, Kylon Middleton, did not vote because he was out of town, though he joined the meeting online. Middleton expressed disappointment in the outcome.The issue could get a third and final vote at the next counci...

After weeks of deliberation and debate that pitted real estate developers against preservationists, Charleston County Council on Oct. 24 decided against amending a law designed to protect historic settlement communities from suburban sprawl.

Three members voted in favor of the amendments, while five voted against. One member, Kylon Middleton, did not vote because he was out of town, though he joined the meeting online. Middleton expressed disappointment in the outcome.

The issue could get a third and final vote at the next council meeting on Nov. 14.

“It’s not over yet,” warned Councilman Henry Darby, who seeks to strengthen safeguards against unwanted development in historic areas.

Those voting in favor of changing the law were Brantley Moody, Joy Boykin and Jenny Costa Honeycutt. Those voting against the modifications were Darby, Larry Kobrovsky, Robert Wehrman, Teddie Pryor and Herbert Sass.

The ordinance, which established and empowered a Historic Preservation Commission, will remain unchanged for now, although many agree — including preservationists — that the law, and the methods used to protect historic neighborhoods, could be improved.

Since 2021, when the commission began operating, developers have been obliged to obtain a certificate of historic appropriateness before their subdivision designs could get final approval from the planning commission. Had the amendments to the law gone into effect, that certificate no longer would have been required as a prerequisite. The Historic Preservation Commission would have functioned only in an advisory capacity.

County staff and some members of the planning commission argued in favor of amending the ordinance because of an alleged conflict between the powers of the HPC and state law, though defenders of the ordinance’s protections rejected that claim.

Preservationists, residents of settlement communities and a few council members have insisted that the ordinance should not be altered without first creating other ways to protect the county’s 20 settlement communities.

Kobrovsky, noting the shift over the last few weeks among his colleagues, called the outcome “a big victory.” The settlement communities are an essential, unique and special part of the Lowcountry, he said. They are the result of “generations of blood, sweat and tears” and must be preserved.

Weakening the ordinance, and thus the powers of the HPC, would have meant the eventual demise of these neighborhoods, Kobrovsky said. Development pressure is increasing in rural areas as the population grows and, if controls are lacking, the whole stretch of land between Mount Pleasant and McClellanville will fill in with subdivisions, he added.

“This is the next frontier; much already has been built out,” he said, adding that development now is encroaching on the county’s settlement communities.

One development company, Crescent Homes, is suing the county because of what it alleges is unfair treatment after getting the necessary permits to build out three subdivisions in the 10 Mile Community near Awendaw.

The HPC denied Crescent Homes the certificate of historic appropriateness, inserting a monkey wrench in the works. The developer had already invested $9 million in projects that had received a green light from the planning commission, and now Crescent Homes is arguing that it has a right to continue with its plans.

The planning commission recently voted to issue final approval of Crescent Homes’ subdivision designs even without the HPC’s certification — an apparent breach of the law. But county staff argued that, due to a presumed conflict with state law, the approval was appropriate.

During the Oct. 24 council meeting, members voted in a 4-4 tie on a zoning change to reduce the density of new construction in the Ten Mile Community from four houses per acre to three. The tie would have meant no change to the zoning and an end to the question, a disappointment to neighborhood advocates. But when that outcome became evident, Darby changed his vote and joined a majority opposed to the new designation in order to keep the matter alive.

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Council members who vote in the majority have a right to revisit an issue at the next meeting. Darby’s move indicates that he’s holding out hope for a different outcome.

Justin Schwebler, properties manager for Historic Charleston Foundation, credited members of the Ten Mile Community and other settlement communities for speaking out. It’s because of them that council has been forced to take development in these neighborhoods seriously. He said the response has been encouraging.

“It’s clear that council is anxious about pulling the rug out from under these communities,” Schwebler said.

He endorsed an idea raised at the council meeting by Ten Mile resident Craig Ascue to organize workshops that foster improved engagement between residents and county representatives. That collaborative effort could lead to a thoughtful restructuring of the ordinance that limits the county’s legal liability, strengthens the HPC and clarifies the process for developers, he said.

“That all needs to be done through a good, open, public process,” Schwebler said. “I hope (county) staff doesn’t see this as a rejection. We just want a seat at the table.”

Jerome Vanderhorst, a resident of the Ten Mile Community, said the fight is far from finished. The Crescent Homes developments are subject to legal disputes; the zoning change is still in play; an effort to establish an overlay district is in the works, but could take some time; and some county staff members and councilmen still seem to seek a resolution that favors development, he said.

In the meantime, his community is in need of infrastructure upgrades. Some areas — especially along Seafood Road, where one of the Crescent Homes subdivisions is being built — are prone to severe flooding, and speed limits are not observed, making the roads unnecessarily dangerous.

He’s waiting to see what council will do about all of this.

“The ball is in their court right now,” Vanderhorst said.

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