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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Clover, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Clover:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Clover, SC

In this small SC town, the mayor-elect has big plans for change

It’s 10 a.m. on a Monday in Clover, S.C., and about three dozen customers hankering for a Southern breakfast fill up the booths in busy Victoria’s Diner.A painted chalkboard takes up an entire wall with the day’s specials. Included among them is Victoria’s Benedict — it’s a homemade biscuit with a choice of bacon, sausage or livermush topped with two eggs and gravy for $6.99.On this day, lifelong Clover resident Bo Legg walks in the front door, and immediately, people notice. He waves at some...

It’s 10 a.m. on a Monday in Clover, S.C., and about three dozen customers hankering for a Southern breakfast fill up the booths in busy Victoria’s Diner.

A painted chalkboard takes up an entire wall with the day’s specials. Included among them is Victoria’s Benedict — it’s a homemade biscuit with a choice of bacon, sausage or livermush topped with two eggs and gravy for $6.99.

On this day, lifelong Clover resident Bo Legg walks in the front door, and immediately, people notice. He waves at some and nods at others with a smile. On his way to a booth, family friend and customer Carol Jenkins laughs and takes him by the arm, offering him a hug. “How’s your mama doing?” she asks.

Legg is Clover’s new mayor-elect. He ousted incumbent Mayor Greg Holmes, who has been in office since 2017, on Nov. 7 by collecting 567 votes out of 890 ballots cast — nearly 64%.

Legg said he ran for the office because it’s his civic duty to represent his town.

“I’m trying to teach my children that if you want to change something, you have to do it by using your muscle,” he said.

Legg has served on the town council since January 2022.

“I love this town,” he said. “I’m trying to protect it for my kids and for everyone else’s children so they can have the same experience I did.”

Legg said he likes to stay active in the community. An example: On a recent weekend, Legg went to a Veterans Day event, followed by the town’s Highland Games and then to a Joy 4 Tots motorcycle rally.

Monday, after coffee at Victoria’s, Legg took down about two dozen American flags he put out for Veterans Day.

Legg said he loves being a voice for the town of Clover — but not a voice for housing developers.

The 44-year-old said he wants the town to stop high-density residential growth, mainly because of the stress he believes it’s causing schools.

“Go by any school in town at dismissal time and look at the lines around the building,” he said. “Our schools are going to be overrun and that’s not good for anybody.”

The Clover school district will build a new high school and an elementary school by 2026. Currently, the Clover school district has seven elementary schools, two middle schools and one high school.

On the school district’s website, an FAQ stated projections from an independent, outside firm show that student enrollment in the Clover School District will exceed this projection in the 2026-2027 school year.

District spokesman Bryan Dillon referenced schools that are at capacity or near capacity, but said the district has schools that have space for students.

Clover, a town of about 7,300 residents 30 miles southwest of Charlotte, encompasses a 4.5-mile radius. Even though Lake Wylie residents attend Clover schools, the Clover mayor does not represent the busy Lake Wylie area, which is not incorporated.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Clover has grown nearly 11% from 2020 to 2022..

Schools are not the only things Legg is concerned about.

Legg said he would also like to bring infrastructure up-to-date, including fixing broken water mains and addressing problems with sewer lines.

Legg said he would like to grow business in the community.

He said he wants to focus on bringing industry to the town, namely to Westgate Industrial Park, which he says is overgrown.

“If you look at the comprehensive plan and where we want to be … we are very residential top-heavy,” he said. “We don’t have that commercial and industrial to balance that out.”

Case in point: Legg said he had been to one ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new business over the past two years he has been on town council, but has been to three over the past month.

He wants to see more.

“I wish I was at a ribbon-cutting every week,” he said.

For current mayor Holmes, this is not the last time the community will see him, he said on a Facebook post.

“My head is not down and (I) remain high because I don’t need a title to make a difference in my community,” he wrote.

Celebrate with Clover during the 53rd annual Christmas Parade

CLOVER, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – The Greater Clover Chamber of Commerce is inviting everyone to attend the 53rd annual Christmas Parade.The parade will take place Saturday, December 3rd, 2023 and will go through Main Street in Downtown Clover.Start your afternoon off with food trucks in Boyd’s parking lot starting at 12 PM. Enjoy a bite to eat and then secure your spot on the parade route along the southbound side of...

CLOVER, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – The Greater Clover Chamber of Commerce is inviting everyone to attend the 53rd annual Christmas Parade.

The parade will take place Saturday, December 3rd, 2023 and will go through Main Street in Downtown Clover.

Start your afternoon off with food trucks in Boyd’s parking lot starting at 12 PM. Enjoy a bite to eat and then secure your spot on the parade route along the southbound side of 321!

The festivities will conclude at 4 PM.

FORT MILL, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – The Town of Fort Mill is excited to celebrate the holiday season with two upcoming events, the Christmas Village, Lighting of the Tree, and the 76th Annual Christmas Parade.

The Town of Fort Mill sharing that the Christmas Village and the lighting of the Tree will take place on Thursday, November 30, 2023.

The event will be held at the Fort Mill Amphitheater at Walter Elisha Park and will start at 5 PM and will go till 8 PM.

The Town of Fort Mill says the night’s festivities will include the lighting of the Town’s 50-foot Christmas Tree in the park, and performances from a handbell choir, school choirs and dance teams.

They also say that there will be vendors, trackless trains and kids’ activities, food trucks, and the opportunity to take a photo with Santa and Mrs. Claus, as well as a variety of holiday characters.

Then on Saturday, December 2nd, 2023, the 76th Annual Fort Mill Christmas Parade will make its way through downtown Fort Mill beginning at 11 AM.

This year’s Grand Marshal is Trudie Bolin Heemsoth who was the first woman to serve on the Fort Mill School Board and served for 16 years. She also served on Fort Mill Town Council for six years.

She will lead the parade, beginning at Tom Hall and Unity Street, traveling through Main Street and North White Street in Historic Downtown Fort Mill and exiting at Walter Elisha Park.

The Town of Fort Mill says the parade is a joyful collection of bands, floats, dancing, go carts, singing, scouts, Strawberry Queens and of course, Santa.

Filming of the parade for Comporium Channel 705 takes place in front of the Fort Mill Fire Station at 121 Tom Hall Street. Emcees David Ward and Ashley Lang will announce each entry as it passes by this location.

Parade Judges will pick winners for Best Car, Best Golf Cart, Best Walking Group, Best Christmas Theme, Most Holiday Spirit and Most Creative.

Old Clover textile mill site may soon see new construction. Here are the latest plans

The rebirth of a former Clover textile mill site as townhomes and commercial space is almost ready to start. That site served as the town’s very first mill 133 years ago.The town planning commission received applications to update and sign off on plans that would allow construction on Old North Main Street. The commission will hear those proposals Thursday night.The town approved a development plan for the m...

The rebirth of a former Clover textile mill site as townhomes and commercial space is almost ready to start. That site served as the town’s very first mill 133 years ago.

The town planning commission received applications to update and sign off on plans that would allow construction on Old North Main Street. The commission will hear those proposals Thursday night.

The town approved a development plan for the more than 6-acre Clover Mill project last year.

Eight properties at and surrounding 602 Old North Main St. will become townhomes and retail space, with some single-family homes and duplex lots. The property at Old North Main and Columbia streets is the former Clover Spinning Mill, or Coltex site.

According to National Register of Historic Places documentation on the Clover Downtown Historic District, the Clover Spinning Mill opened in 1890 as the town’s first mill and led to significant employment and population growth. County land records only show ownership back to 1965 when Halls Textile Machinery acquired it.

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February 21, 2022 8:00 AM

Now owner K2 Development NC has applied for minor changes in lot layout, but also for final plat approval for the first area of construction. A plat is a layout of how land is divided. Final plat approval shows how development projects are subdivided and often is among the final steps before construction starts.

The entire Clover Mill project will have 52 townhomes, three single-family homes and six more duplex or townhome units, depending on a requested change for more townhomes. It also will have some commercial space.

Clover Mill West is the 1-acre portion up for final plat review. It’s at 113 Old North Main St., on the northwest corner of Columbia and Old North Main. Clover Mill West will include three homes and six townhomes.

K2 Development out of Charlotte bought the eight-property Clover Mill site for $250,000 in January, according to county land records. The properties hadn’t been sold since 2014, and were last run by Coltex Inc. prior to a late 2011 sale. The property has had several uses in machining, manufacturing and textile spinning.

Redevelopment plans submitted to the town offered a different picture, with driveways leading to townhomes with two-car garages, sidewalks, small parks and a playground.

New uses for former mill sites has been an issue not just in Clover, but in many area towns and cities that once thrived on textiles.

The Springs mill that once employed much of Fort Mill’s population became Elisha Park. An entire downtown corridor in Rock Hill continues to transform as University Center adds apartments, restaurants and retail.

Clover once had multiple mill sites in operation.

In 2019 the town held a workshop in search of plans for the former American Thread property at 401 S. Main St. That 16-acre site is about a mile south from the Clover Mill redevelopment. A plumbing company out of Charlotte owns it. The property hasn’t changed hands since 2014.

“The owner of the American Thread site does not appear to have any immediate plans to improve the property,” said Allison Harvey, town administrator.

The Clover Mill update isn’t the only large proposal for the town.

Destiny’s Calling Ministries in Charlotte applied to build a faith-based campus on more than 12 acres between 303 and 305 Cheek Road. The church site would include a girls home, chapel and pavilion.

The large, open site is beside both the Cloverbrook and Clover Meadows neighborhoods. Destiny’s Calling wants to put about 3,200 square feet of group home space, a 5,400-square-foot chapel and a 2,400-square-foot pavilion on its property.

Potential future uses, according to its application, include two more group homes for girls, four homes and four duplexes.

Destiny’s Calling will bring its concept plan for review by the planning commission Thursday and then will have to submit more detailed site plans for the various construction pieces.

Clover's 5-year plan to revitalize downtown

Vacant buildings on Main Street will soon be transformed into restaurants and cafes.CLOVER, S.C. — The town of Clover has a five-year plan to revitalize its Main Street area with new businesses, signage, and connectivity.Clover’s downtown is filled with empty buildings after many small businesses were forced to shut down during the pandemic.“A lot of things happened with the economy and places had to shut down," Clover’s ...

Vacant buildings on Main Street will soon be transformed into restaurants and cafes.

CLOVER, S.C. — The town of Clover has a five-year plan to revitalize its Main Street area with new businesses, signage, and connectivity.

Clover’s downtown is filled with empty buildings after many small businesses were forced to shut down during the pandemic.

“A lot of things happened with the economy and places had to shut down," Clover’s Main Street Director Alicia Griffith said.

For the latest breaking news, weather and traffic alerts, download the WCNC Charlotte mobile app and enable push notifications.

Now, the town is rebuilding for the future. Several vacant commercial spaces along Main Street have been bought by developers who plan to breathe new life into them.

Clover native Justin McFalls announced recently he bought four units in between The Clover Station and The Vault.

“It’s always been a dream for me to own this building,” McFalls told WCNC Charlotte.

More houses are being built and the small town is growing. McFalls wants to give people more places to go for a fun night out.

"We want them to stay downtown," he said. "On the weekends, Friday and Saturday nights, it’s like a ghost town."

McFalls' first tenant is a pizza restaurant called King of Fire. Plus, Griffith told WCNC Charlotte two coffee shops are opening in the area this year.

"A lot of the buildings have sat for so long," Griffith said. "So, there's a lot of work that needs to be done to bring them up to code and some other stuff. So, we're working on some business incentives to really try to offset some of that cost."

One incentive is a $3,000 grant for businesses to clean up their facades. Griffith said they're also working to establish historic overlays, which will not only protect the town's character but offer tax breaks for businesses.

You can stream WCNC Charlotte on Roku, Amazon Fire TV and Apple TV, just download the free app.

Clover is working with Main Street America, a national program Monroe, Belmont, and Waxhaw have used to implement a five-year growth plan.

The goal is to boost economic development by recruiting restaurants and retail while keeping Clover’s small-town charm.

Griffith told WCNC Charlotte the town is also looking at properties to create more parking for the downtown area in the future.

Nearly 20 years after SC legalized tattoo parlors, York County’s first is set to open

York County’s first tattoo parlor is ready to make its mark, with grand opening activities planned for Saturday.The Local Tattoo has a noon ribbon cutting and 1 p.m. raffle at 1140 S.C. 55 E. in Clover. The tattoo shop will give away $3,000 in ...

York County’s first tattoo parlor is ready to make its mark, with grand opening activities planned for Saturday.

The Local Tattoo has a noon ribbon cutting and 1 p.m. raffle at 1140 S.C. 55 E. in Clover. The tattoo shop will give away $3,000 in free tattoo prizes, according to an online event page.

Artists are taking online bookings now. Walk-ins are welcome, too. The new shop will be open Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., according to its website.

The shop is one of two buildings on the same parcel between Courtney’s BBQ and Brew and the Clover Area Assistance Center.

A former gas station built in 1950 sits on the property. So does the former Market on Main building. A Belmont, North Carolina, company bought the property in 2013.

Devon Aguila and Heather Ireland moved to Clover last year from Arizona. They closed a shop there and planned to open one in their new hometown when they realized they were somewhere different. Where they left, tattoo shops were everywhere.

”We were really looking to get a location in our town,” Ireland said. “We really haven’t seen any tattoo studios in York County.”

South Carolina law didn’t allow tattoo parlors until 2004. Now the state health department regulates them.

Tattoo parlors aren’t allowed within 1,000 feet of a school, church or playground, but otherwise it’s up to counties or municipalities to set their own zoning rules for where they can be.

Almost two decades after tattoo parlors became legal, the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control lists 162 parlors statewide. Columbia has 22 of them. Myrtle Beach has 16. Spartanburg has 12 parlors, Sumter and Anderson contain eight each and several smaller communities across the state have a handful each.

The Local Tattoo in Clover is the first and only one located in York County. Neither Lancaster nor Chester counties has one, either.

In 2017 Long Island, New York, entrepreneur Lou Rubino moved south and set up shop in unincorporated Fort Mill for three tattoo-related businesses in an industrial park near Carowinds. Within a year about 50 employees worked at Ultimate Tattoo Supply, United Ink Productions and World Famous Tattoo Ink. The companies brought tattoo machines, needles and ink, and even started the Queen City Tattoo & Arts Festival in Charlotte.

There are other surface level ties to tattoos in the area.

Rock Hill has Tattooed Brews, a bar and restaurant concept that celebrates the inked lifestyle in its name but doesn’t ink customers. The Mercantile in Rock Hill opened a temporary tattoo parlor in 2019 billed as a family friendly place for inked art lasting two to four days.

Tattoos were part of a much larger conversation in Rock Hill that same year, in relation to the since failed Carolina Panthers headquarters project that was once destined for York County.

Representatives for the NFL team sought several concessions related to the anticipated move of its team practice facility from Charlotte to Rock Hill. They wanted to be allowed two potential uses disallowed by state law — gambling venues and bars selling alcohol past 2 a.m. They also wanted two potential uses prohibited by Rock Hill law, cigar bars and tattoo parlors.

Ultimately none of those requests were the reason the Panthers project fell through last year. The timing and allocation of public funding were reasons given by the team.

Earlier this year a change.org petition popped up calling for Rock Hill zoning rule changes to allow a tattoo parlor. City planning staff brought up tattoo sites in some recent public meetings on other zoning questions, but haven’t made significant changes.

York County took up questions on tattoo parlors as part of its recent recoding of zoning rules last year.

Ireland said it took a while to find a spot that fit parameters to get a licensed tattoo place in South Carolina.

”Our vision for this studio is, we’re really looking to offer our community a high-end tattoo studio,” Ireland said. “They come in and all our staff are professional. It’s bright, airy, clean.”

There’s pressure, Ireland said, about being the first parlor in the county. “We want to be accepted by our community.”

Ireland said there can be negative stigmas associated with tattoos or parlors. Owners hope if there are people in the community with concerns or who are skeptical, they’ll come out Saturday and meet the new crew.

”We’re here for the art,” Ireland said. “We’re here for the clients.”

This story was originally published November 3, 2023, 2:03 PM.

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