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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Folly Beach, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Folly Beach:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Folly Beach, SC

As Nicole approaches, erosion is the big concern at Folly Beach

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - When Hurricane Ian stormed through the Lowcountry in September, it left Folly Beach’s erosion defenses wiped out, clearing the way for Tropical Storm Nicole to continue the assault on the coastline. The city is now requesting help to restore beach erosion.Residents have come to the beach throughout the day to see the damage as high tides Thursday morning came up all the way to the sand dunes, an area that is normally very dry.“A large concern in that request is the lack of storm protection...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - When Hurricane Ian stormed through the Lowcountry in September, it left Folly Beach’s erosion defenses wiped out, clearing the way for Tropical Storm Nicole to continue the assault on the coastline. The city is now requesting help to restore beach erosion.

Residents have come to the beach throughout the day to see the damage as high tides Thursday morning came up all the way to the sand dunes, an area that is normally very dry.

“A large concern in that request is the lack of storm protection and flood mitigation in place to buffer from another hurricane,” Nicole Elko, coastal consultant for Folly Beach, said. “Folly Beach has little to no capacity to withstand additional erosion from another storm. Fortunately, the dune system is robust along most of the island and that will help protect the upland infrastructure.”

With a high tide on Thursday of 8.63 feet the Folly River bridge, the effects from Nicole are already visible. The city’s director of public works, Eric Lutz, says between Ian and Nicole, portions of the beach are now completely gone at certain points of the day.

With Nicole, the beach has very little capacity to withstand storms, which means less beach for everyone.

“So now we’re going to be looking at lots of areas on the beach where anywhere it’s not low tide, you won’t have any beach to hang out on,” Lutz said. “There will be variants on that but anywhere, probably east of the washout, is going to be pretty severe so you’ll have beach maybe between half of the cycle between tides.”

Lutz says the amount of beach comes and goes. He says this is not the worst erosion he has ever seen.

Lutz says large concrete slabs, known as groins, were installed on the beach around the Folly Beach Pier back in the 90s. They were designed to catch the sand and create sand dunes. Before the storms, those groins were completely covered by sand except for a few feet of exposed concrete painted yellow. Now the storms have whisked away enough sand to expose 15 feet of concrete.

The city tells me this is a groin placed here in the 90s to help catch sand and build the beach. Before #Ian and #Nicole the only visible part was the yellow tip. There are several other groins like this along the beach. #wx #beach #erosion #chsnews @Live5News https://t.co/sFsPolGq2d

— Nick Reagan (@NickReaganLive5) November 10, 2022

Elko says the city is already in the process of requesting federal emergency rehabilitation assistance from Ian impacts. Lutz says he hopes to get new sand on the beach by 2024.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Folly Beach officials to assess erosion caused by Nicole on Monday

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — Nicole brought rain, choppy waves, and wind to Folly Beach on Thursday.To some, the storm was a surprise."We flew in for the vacation yesterday," said one visitor from New York. "We flew in at 10, and we didn’t know there was a tropical storm, so we made the best of it in Charleston."Come Friday morning, it was business as usual.Construction continued on the Folly Pier, with crews hoping to stay on time and have the new pier open by the spring of 2023....

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — Nicole brought rain, choppy waves, and wind to Folly Beach on Thursday.

To some, the storm was a surprise.

"We flew in for the vacation yesterday," said one visitor from New York. "We flew in at 10, and we didn’t know there was a tropical storm, so we made the best of it in Charleston."

Come Friday morning, it was business as usual.

Construction continued on the Folly Pier, with crews hoping to stay on time and have the new pier open by the spring of 2023.

While there was no significant damage to any buildings, Mayor Tim Goodwin said there is significant beach erosion.

The mayor said that erosion will be surveyed on Monday because of the holiday on Friday.

"There’s definitely been more erosion and change in the dunes, especially since we have been here over the last few weeks," said Leah Sin, who is visiting from North Carolina. "We have come out at high tide and low tide all the time."

Sin and her kids, Remy and Sully, were checking out the beach after the storm. They have been staying at Folly for the last few weeks.

"We were already here and – it was a little unexpected. We weren't sure how to navigate it, because we don’t deal with a lot of storms," said Sin.

Some people on the beach were walking, others enjoying a cup of coffee. But most were just taking in the views.

A few surfers caught some waves, and one lifeguard we caught up with was going for a swim.

"It wasn’t my intention to swim, but I had to check it out," said one vacationer. "It was a little bit rough out there. Not so much that it will pull you out."

The storm definitely did not ruin the vacation for the people we spoke with.

"This is a dream come true. This is our favorite place," said Sin.

"With my string of luck, this is my second tropical storm on my second vacation this year. So, you have to make the best of it," said another vacationer.

City of Folly Beach asking for public comment on proposed parking plan

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Folly Beach is asking for public comment on its new proposed parking plan.The proposed plan is looking to bring both paid and free parking to the area. They are submitting the plan to the South Carolina Department of Transportation Saturday and are encouraging residents to share their opinions beforehand.According to the c...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Folly Beach is asking for public comment on its new proposed parking plan.

The proposed plan is looking to bring both paid and free parking to the area. They are submitting the plan to the South Carolina Department of Transportation Saturday and are encouraging residents to share their opinions beforehand.

According to the city, the new proposal adds 131 paid parking spaces along the front beach, bringing the new total of paid parking spaces to 33% of all front beach spaces.

They plan to add paid parking spaces along Artic Avenue and up numbered streets. They are also planning to add free parking along Ashley Avenue, on top of the free parking that already exists on the street.

The city said the plan was developed with the goal of giving residents and visitors equal opportunity to prime parking. For each paid parking space proposed, two additional free spots were created, according to the city.

However, it appears not everyone is on board with the proposal.

The Charleston Beach Foundation released a response to the plan objecting to the increase in paid parking.

They also challenged the claim that only 33% of the parking is paid for, claiming that some of the free spaces included in the equation are blocked by debris, ditches, or other encroachments.

“Many spots that they’re claiming you can park, you can’t fit a car there. Not to mention... If you go to the beach here as an older person, or with a family, or whatever, it’s about a mile walk to get to any sort of facilities,” Tim Jump, who provided research to the Beach Foundation, said.

He’s a frequent surfer on Folly and said he believes that the beach, like the rest of nature, should be free to everyone.

In a statement, the city’s mayor said:

“The free and paid parking space counts shown on the plan are based on a physical inventory of spaces within the DOT right of way. The number of free spaces does not include obstructed areas. The scale of the map does not lend itself to a space-by-space demarcation on each block. However, the actual count of spaces within the areas marked as free parking was conducted in person and does not include areas where a vehicle cannot be parked. The count of free parking spaces also does not include spaces located on County property at the County Park and Folly Pier. Alternatively, the beachfront parking lots that are shown on the map are for reference only. They are outside of the DOT right of way and were not included in the tally of paid parking spaces.”

Comments will be accepted until this Saturday. The city said all comments should be emailed to comments@follybeach.gov.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

10 South Carolina Beaches Worth Visiting In The Winter (Over Summer)

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winte...

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winter vacation full of sun, sand, and off-season adventure.

Hilton Head

Known as “America’s Favorite Island,” Hilton Head is so much more than one of South Carolina’s most visited summer beach towns; it’s also a lovely escape in the off-season for those looking for year-round beachy vibes. And with an average daytime temperature in the low-to-mid 60s, the weather is just balmy enough to still enjoy (most) of HH’s most popular outdoor activities—without the summer crowds.

Folly Beach

The popular Folly Beach is just minutes from downtown Charleston, making it an ideal spot to take a winter break. Temperatures in the 60s throughout make for cooler days that are still perfect for Low Country exploring, while nearby Charleston has a number of fun winter activities that are just a stone’s throw away from Folly Beach’s laidback vibes and picturesque beauty.

Myrtle Beach

Myrtle Beach is undoubtedly one of South Carolina’s top-rated beaches throughout the summer—but in the off-season, the beautiful beach town is still a bustling hub of activities and events that make it a wow-worthy winter destination, too. And while it may be too cool to take a dip, MB’s outdoor scenery is just as lovely as it is in the summer.

Kiawah Island

Kiawah Island is a secluded beach town escape whose year-round laidback vibes make it the perfect place to visit in winter’s cooler months. Undoubtedly, one of the best reasons to visit Kiawah is its relaxing atmosphere—made even better by the lack of summer crowds—but there are still plenty of outdoor activities and recreation on tap for outdoor enthusiasts, too.

Isle Of Palms

Isle of Palms may be known for its stellar summer recreation; however, this Charleston area beach is so much more than a warm weather retreat. Throughout the off-season, this picturesque SC beach’s tranquil (and mostly crowd-free!) vibes become the perfect getaway for those looking for a beachfront vacay with plenty to see and do during the cool(er) winter months.

Sullivan’s Island

A neighbor to Isle of Palms located at the mouth of the lovely Charleston harbor, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect mix of small-town charm and relaxing, beachside fun. Home to beautiful beaches, outdoor adventures, and nearby activities galore, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect winter getaway.

Pawley’s Island

Known as one of America’s oldest and best summer resort communities, Pawley’s Island may seem like an exclusively warm weather destination. However, when the summer crowds leave, there are still plenty of things to see and do in this historic SC beach town.

Murrells Inlet

A popular fishing village near Myrtle Beach, Murrells Inlet is packed with charm, history, and wonderful waterfront scenery that make it a gorgeous year-round getaway. From pirate lore to oodles of outdoor recreation, SC’s “seafood capital” is a fun-filled winter retreat.

Litchfield Beach

Well known for its pristine white sand and turquoise waters that make for an idyllic summer retreat, Litchfield Beach is no less beautiful during the cool(er) winter months. Come for the activities like fishing and biking, but stay for the relaxing, scenic vibes available year-round.

Surfside Beach

Located near Myrtle Beach, the spectacularly scenic Surfside Beach is known as a popular family-friendly destination throughout the summer. However, there’s plenty to do here during the off-season, too, for those looking to escape the warm weather crowds.

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

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