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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Fort Mill, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Fort Mill:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Fort Mill, SC

New Fort Mill hospital looking to recruit nurses as health care industry faces shortages

Nationwide, nursing shortages are plaguing the healthcare system. Piedmont Medical Center now has to compete with other area hospital systems.FORT MILL, S.C. — Piedmont Medical Center is on track to open its new hospital in Fort Mill this fall and the company is looking to hire staff members to fill the new facility.Piedmont Medical Center Fort Mill, which has been in the works for over a ...

Nationwide, nursing shortages are plaguing the healthcare system. Piedmont Medical Center now has to compete with other area hospital systems.

FORT MILL, S.C. — Piedmont Medical Center is on track to open its new hospital in Fort Mill this fall and the company is looking to hire staff members to fill the new facility.

Piedmont Medical Center Fort Mill, which has been in the works for over a decade, is located at the intersection of South Carolina Highway 160 and U.S. 21. Medical equipment is in place and rooms are almost ready to serve a community that, until now, has been forced to travel to Charlotte or Rock Hill for care.

“The population has grown significantly both during COVID and beforehand and we’re really excited to open the hospital,” Chris Mitchell, the hospital's CEO, said.

But the number of skilled bedside nurses in the state is shrinking, leaving every hospital fighting to fill open positions. Officials at Piedmont Medical Center know they’ll have to be competitive as they actively recruit workers. They’ve held several hiring events and are currently offering signing bonuses up to $20,000.

“Our focus is not just meeting the financial needs and what the market is demanding, but also meeting the needs of the individual people who will work in the building and what that means to them when they show up every day, the team and culture,” Tammy Moore, the chief nursing officer at Piedmont Medical Center Fort Mill said.

On top of that, there are several other hospitals being built in the Charlotte area, including a new Atrium hospital in Cornelius, CaroMont's new Belmont hospital and a Novant hospital in Ballantyne.

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill found North Carolina nursing programs produce less than two-thirds of the nurses needed to staff the state’s hospitals. Leaders with the North Carolina Nurses Association believe building up that pipeline is dependent on the educators training tomorrow's nurses.

“I can make twice as much as a nurse taking care of patients as I can in a teaching role," Dr. Dennis Taylor said. "So, until we get that pay discrepancy and that compensation issue addressed, it’s going to be really hard, I think, for us to recruit folks in."

As the final touches are put on the new hospital in Fort Mill, leaders are hopeful the new building, equipment and opportunity will be appealing.

“It’s essentially a blank slate and you get to write what that looks like,” Moore said. “It’s daunting in some ways but it’s very exciting in other ways.”

The next hiring event is at the hospital on July 28 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Hospital officials said they’ll be making offers on the spot.

The hospital is on track to open on Sept. 7.

Fort Mill now has an urban winery. See what’s happening, and coming soon to downtown

Illumination Wines has been open only a week in Fort Mill, but already the new spot feels like home. Which is the point of the place.The building at 201 Springs St., just a short walk across the Tom Hall Street intersection from Main Street, has a long history of residential and commercial uses. Most recently it was filled with offices. Linda Shadday and her daughter, Amanda Tellier, transformed the roughly 2,000-square-foot space into a wine tas...

Illumination Wines has been open only a week in Fort Mill, but already the new spot feels like home. Which is the point of the place.

The building at 201 Springs St., just a short walk across the Tom Hall Street intersection from Main Street, has a long history of residential and commercial uses. Most recently it was filled with offices. Linda Shadday and her daughter, Amanda Tellier, transformed the roughly 2,000-square-foot space into a wine tasting gathering spot.

Hardwood floors were kept. A new bar area welcomes guests near the entrance. Various seating rooms for book club, birthday party or other social gatherings of up to about 20 people fill the downstairs area.

Shadday and Tellier team to own and run Illumination Wines. In a back kitchen, Breanna Tuggle runs the separate but partner business Brie’s Boards, which serves cheeses and meats.

“We do grazing tables at events,” Tuggle said. “We do charcuterie boards, delivery, pickup as well, here. And then we’re also the in-house charcuterie kitchen.”

Both businesses aim to create a comfortable feel for guests who want to walk in and try something different in the downtown area.

“You’re walking to your neighbor’s house,” Tuggle said. “You’re home. You feel relaxed. That’s one of the biggest selling points we’ve heard.”

After a couple of soft opening events, Illumination held its grand opening over Memorial Day weekend.

“The whole front yard was filled with people,” Shadday said. “It was great.”

Shadday lives in Chester, Tellier in Tega Cay. Their family came from North Carolina prior. The new wine spot is several years in the making.

“It’s kind of been one of our favorite pastimes as a mother and daughter bonding thing,” Tellier said. “We would go to wineries together and do wine tastings. One day we were just drinking some wine at a winery not too far from here and we were like, we could do something like this.”

The pair originally envisioned a destination winery in Chester County. Then they heard about an urban winery concept in Davidson, N.C., that they thought they could replicate.

“We said, you know, that’s what we need to do,” Shadday said.

The pair searched for a site for more than a year. Shadday was turning around in Fort Mill one day when she saw a for lease sign at the Springs Street location.

“We are super excited to have it in this house because it just has such character and flair and uniqueness,” Shadday said. “It’s eclectic.”

Illumination offers domestic and international wines, many of the labels unavailable in retail stores. There are wine elixers, or wine-based cocktails. There are unique drinks like a pineapple upside down moscato. There are wine flights in test tube form.

“Wine is both science and art,” Tellier said, “so we’re trying to combine the two into a tasting experience.”

The site has a fermentation room, and eventually will make its own small batch craft wines.

“That’s going to be phase two,” Tellier said. “It’s going to be a couple of months.”

Because few grape varieties grow in South Carolina, Shadday said, most in-state wineries have to bring in grapes from elsewhere. Illumination already has partnerships to get its grapes. Wine will be made in a back room away from the parlors and meeting spaces for guests.

“We’ll be bottling back there, labeling and fermenting,” Shadday said.

Sunday brunch boards, baked brie and other food will be available through Tuggle’s business, which started as a home-based online company more than a year ago. Tuggle grew the business and needed a commercial kitchen, which fit perfectly with what Illumination had with its new site.

“Who doesn’t love wine and cheese, right?” Tuggle said. “Outside that, Linda and Amanda have been fantastic business partners over the last year, year-and-a-half almost that we’ve known each other.”

Illumination also stands to gain from the growing pedestrian traffic downtown, where a slew of new restaurant openings in recent years make for a busy Main Street most evenings. Already Illumination has had calls from groups walking up from other businesses on Main.

“We just want more businesses to bring lots of people to the area, to the park, to shop, eat and drink,” Shadday said. “It’s good for everybody.”

Illumination is open noon to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

This story was originally published June 1, 2022 11:54 AM.

People in York County are shifting. One place in particular just keeps getting bigger.

In a year, Fort Mill added more residents than all but two other cities or towns in South Carolina.The U.S. Census Bureau released new population estimates Thursday for municipalities across the nation. The figures show estimates as of July 1, 2021, compared to that same date in 2020. Of the 270 incorporated places in South Carolina, most of the ones in York and surrounding counties grew.The estimated 27,991 residents in Fort Mill in mid-2021 is up 2,736 peop...

In a year, Fort Mill added more residents than all but two other cities or towns in South Carolina.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new population estimates Thursday for municipalities across the nation. The figures show estimates as of July 1, 2021, compared to that same date in 2020. Of the 270 incorporated places in South Carolina, most of the ones in York and surrounding counties grew.

The estimated 27,991 residents in Fort Mill in mid-2021 is up 2,736 people in a year. Those estimates don’t include the vast number of people with Fort Mill addresses who aren’t in town limits, notably Baxter and the Carowinds corridor. Unincorporated, or township, numbers were released with the recent data.

Only the slightly larger municipalities of Bluffton (3,457 resident increase) and Greer (3,068) grew by more people than Fort Mill. If the number of new residents in Fort Mill alone were its own town, it would rank in the top 100 in the state (No. 95).

In a year, York County grew by roughly the population of Clover. Yet much of the county’s population lives in unincorporated areas like Lake Wylie, or beyond the outskirts of Rock Hill and York.

Of the 288,595 estimated York County residents in mid-2021, about 54% live outside the nine cities and towns.

Rock Hill hasn’t grown in recent years at the rate Fort Mill has, but it’s still the largest population center in the county. The 74,102 estimated Rock Hill residents in mid-2021 is almost 26% of the county total. Yet the city population is down 55 residents in a year.

Fort Mill accounts for almost 10% of the York County population. Tega Cay is next at almost 5%.

Trends are visible dating back more than a decade. The 56% of York County residents who lived outside city or town limits in 2010 isn’t far off the 54% current mark. Yet a greater percentage of county residents each year come from the areas nearest Interstate 77 and the North Carolina border with Charlotte.

Rock Hill had 29% of the county population in 2010, 3% more than it does now. Fort Mill had less than 5%, about half what it has now. Tega Cay had about 3% of the county total, a little more than half what it has now.

Since 2010 the county has grown by more than 62,000 residents. Or, almost as many people as lived in Rock Hill in 2010. It’s a growth rate of almost 28%.

In that span, Fort Mill and Tega Cay combine to account for 41,269 more residents, or about two-thirds of that countywide growth rate. Rock Hill has grown by 7,948 residents since 2010.

While they aren’t reflected in the new data, years of new homebuilding trends in the area show similar growth in two other areas that border Charlotte. Lake Wylie in York County and Indian Land in Lancaster County remain some of the highest-growth areas in the region.

Both Lake Wylie and Indian Land are unincorporated areas. Their growth is reflected in countywide totals for their respective counties.

Here’s a look at one-year growth for municipalities in York, Lancaster and Chester counties:

Nutramax Laboratories expanding operations in Lancaster County

$30 million investment to create approximately 200 new jobs COLUMBIA, S.C. – ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Nutramax Laboratories, an industry-leading manufacturer and marketer of nutritional supplement products for people and pets, today announced plans to expand operations in Lancaster County. The company’s $30 million investment will create approximately 200 new jobs.

For 30 years, Nutramax Laboratories has been researching and developing high-quality nutritional supplement products. In 2010, the company conducted a multi-state site search and moved its animal health business and corporate operations to Lancaster County and, since that time, has been actively engaged in the Lancaster community, providing support to local schools and churches, area law enforcement and fire services, numerous small businesses and many local charitable organizations. Nutramax Laboratories operates facilities in both South Carolina and Maryland and continues to be an industry leader in setting and adhering to high standards in research, manufacturing and quality control.

In addition to three existing locations in Lancaster, Nutramax Laboratories’ new facility will be located at 785 Fort Mill Highway in Indian Land and will house additional warehousing, distribution and future manufacturing capabilities.

Individuals interested in joining the Nutramax Laboratories team should visit the company’s careers page.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has approved job development credits related to this project. The council has also awarded a $500,000 Set-Aside grant to Lancaster County to assist with costs related to this project.

QUOTES

“We are pleased to continue to grow in Lancaster County. With this newest expansion to the Indian Land area, we will continue providing a positive impact that goes beyond our economic development commitments. For 30 years, we have been blessed with a fantastic team of employees committed to delivering the very best to our consumers. Our values of glorifying God, serving our people, supporting our community and pursuing excellence have created an unwavering guide to fulfilling our mission.” -Nutramax Laboratories President and CEO Todd Henderson, DVM

“When leading companies like Nutramax Laboratories find long-term success in our state, it shows the world that we have the business-friendly environment and skilled workforce in place where companies can grow. Congratulations to Nutramax Laboratories on this latest expansion in Lancaster County, and we look forward to their continued success in South Carolina.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“Nutramax Laboratories’ expansion highlights the growth that life sciences companies are experiencing throughout South Carolina. We congratulate them on their expansion and look forward to a strong partnership for many years to come.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

“We are excited that Nutramax is adding a fourth location in Lancaster County. They are demonstrating how businesses not only can succeed, but thrive in Lancaster County. They are a great corporate citizen and embody our economic development tagline – where big ideas become reality.-Lancaster County Council Chair Steve Harper

Bouncing back: Maddie Drerup, Fort Mill softball even SC title series with Lexington

Maddie Drerup didn’t have one of her best performances in the opening game of the Class 5A state championship series. That wasn’t the case for Drerup and the Fort Mill softball team in Game 2.The senior and USC Upstate signee tossed a one-hitter and hit a go-ahead grand slam Wednesday as the Yellow Jackets defeated Lexington 7-2.With the win, Fort Mill forced a deciding game in the best-of-three series that it will be played at 6:30 p.m. Friday at Blythewood High School.“Sometimes you have bad games and...

Maddie Drerup didn’t have one of her best performances in the opening game of the Class 5A state championship series. That wasn’t the case for Drerup and the Fort Mill softball team in Game 2.

The senior and USC Upstate signee tossed a one-hitter and hit a go-ahead grand slam Wednesday as the Yellow Jackets defeated Lexington 7-2.

With the win, Fort Mill forced a deciding game in the best-of-three series that it will be played at 6:30 p.m. Friday at Blythewood High School.

“Sometimes you have bad games and you have good games. But I wanted to come out tonight and show who I really am,” Drerup said. “Last night, I don’t feel like I pitched my best game at all. I trust in my team, and we just wanted to prove we were deserving of this right here.”

Drerup gave up eight runs on 13 hits in Tuesday’s opening 8-0 loss to Lexington. But the Wildcats couldn’t get much against her in Game 2. She took a no-hitter into the bottom of the seventh until Peyton Baker’s single with one out.

Drerup struck out 10 and walked five, three of them intentionally to Lexington catcher Sarah Gordon.

Fort Mill coach Chuck Stegall wasn’t going to pitch to Gordon, who doubled and homered twice in the opening game. Gordon has a school-record 19 homers this season and is signed to play at Louisville.

Gordon was intentionally walked twice with nobody on base and again with the bases loaded in the bottom of the fifth and Fort Mill up 4-0. Lexington got a run on the walk and then a Jessica Senn sacrifice fly, but had a runner thrown out at third to end the threat.

“Sarah Gordon is someone who can change the game and the dynamic with one swing,” Stegall said. “I’m sorry, I love the kid but we just couldn’t let her bat.”

Lexington coach Laurie Epps wasn’t surprised by the strategy not to pitch to her star and said she didn’t understand why more teams didn’t do the same this year.

Lexington pitcher MacKenzie Mathis matched Drerup until the Yellow Jackets (18-6) broke out in the fifth. With two on and two outs, Ava Balsinger singled to load the bases. Drerup then homered to make it 4-0 and take some enthusiasm out of the jam-packed crowd at Lexington.

“I have had some good ones in the past, but it would be hard for me to trade her for any of them,” Stegall said of Drerup. “She is a scrapper on defense, a scrapper on offense. … She is electrifying.”

Brynn Bartolini added an RBI single and Balsinger had a two-run homer in the sixth to make it 7-2.

The loss was Lexington’s third off the season and first home loss since last year’s playoff defeat to Summerville.

Epps, however, remains confident in her team and the ability to bounce back. The Wildcats (27-3) played in a deciding Game 3 in 2019 when they defeated Byrnes for the state championship. Some of the team’s seniors this year were on that championship squad.

“We haven’t lost a lot this season, but when we have we have come back and played pretty good softball,” Epps said. “I am confident in the girls I have in that dugout. We are going to be OK.”

WP: Maddie Drerup LP: Mackenzie Mathis. Hitters: FM: Bartolini 2-4 RBI; Balsinger 3-4 HR, 2 RBI; Drerup 1-3 HR, 4 RBI; Poteat 2-3. L: Warren 1-2.

Wednesday

Class 5A

Fort Mill 7, Lexington 2, series tied 1-1

Class 4A

North Augusta 8, Catawba Ridge 0, NA wins series 2-0

Class 3A

Aynor 2, Broome 1, series tied 1-1

Class 2A

Gray Collegiate 2, Latta 1, Gray wins series 2-0

Class A

This story was originally published May 25, 2022 10:08 PM.

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