loading
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Fort Mill, SC

Let's Talk!

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Fort Mill:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Fort Mill, SC

Manufacturer establishes ‘flagship’ plant with $150M investment in Fort Mill

Silfab Solar has operations in Bellingham and Burlington, Wash., and Toronto, Canada. Silfab has been in the solar business for more than 40 years, the company said in a news release from the state Commerce Department.Silfab Solar designs, engineers and manufactures its own premium brand of high-efficiency solar panels for residential and commercial use.“Silfab Solar’s investment in South Carolina strengthens our North America manufacturing capabilities, creates good-paying jobs and provides the ideal East Coast loc...

Silfab Solar has operations in Bellingham and Burlington, Wash., and Toronto, Canada. Silfab has been in the solar business for more than 40 years, the company said in a news release from the state Commerce Department.

Silfab Solar designs, engineers and manufactures its own premium brand of high-efficiency solar panels for residential and commercial use.

“Silfab Solar’s investment in South Carolina strengthens our North America manufacturing capabilities, creates good-paying jobs and provides the ideal East Coast location to serve our growing customers,” CEO Paolo Maccario said in the news release. “We look forward to expanding our industry-leading position for made-in-America solar. The company specifically chose York County as the ideal location to expand because of the community’s commitment to innovation, its quality of life and the availability of a skilled workforce. Silfab Solar looks forward to hiring and to begin production of next-generation solar modules.”

Related article: Sumter lands $66M plant — here’s what it will make

Related article: Manufacturer to establish $33M US operations in Orangeburg County

Related article: South Carolina businesses benefit from $266M in federal clean energy funding

The company is leasing a 785,000-square-foot building at 7149 Logistics Lane in Fort Mill for a facility that will manufacture the next-generation solar cell technology and boost U.S solar cell production, the release said.

“Silfab Solar selecting York County for a project that requires a highly skilled workforce shows that our workforce development investments are paying off in a big way,” Gov. Henry McMaster said in the release. “Our people are South Carolina’s greatest resource, and we are confident they will help Silfab Solar thrive in its latest venture. Congratulations to Silfab Solar on this project and welcome to South Carolina.”
Operations are expected to be online in the third quarter of 2024. Jobs are posted online.

“With an established West Coast presence, we are delighted that Silfab Solar chose South Carolina for its new, East Coast operations,” Commerce Secretary Harry M. Lightsey III said in the release. “Our state is proud to be a proven destination for growing companies seeking long-term success. Silfab Solar’s 800 new jobs represent incredible opportunities for York County and beyond.”

The Commerce Department’s Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved job develoment credits related to the project. The council also awarded a $2 million Set-Aside grant to York County to assist with the costs of building improvements.

Solar panel manufacturer eyeing Fort Mill facility

The deal would create 800 jobs and aims to meet the needs of the growing solar energy industry in the Carolinas.FORT MILL, S.C. — A solar panel manufacturer is hoping to come to Fort Mill. The company got its second round of approval from York County leaders Monday and needs one more vote before moving forward.The news comes as solar energy gains popularity in the Carolinas."10 years ago it was less than 1% of our energy mix in the Carolinas," explained ...

The deal would create 800 jobs and aims to meet the needs of the growing solar energy industry in the Carolinas.

FORT MILL, S.C. — A solar panel manufacturer is hoping to come to Fort Mill. The company got its second round of approval from York County leaders Monday and needs one more vote before moving forward.

The news comes as solar energy gains popularity in the Carolinas.

"10 years ago it was less than 1% of our energy mix in the Carolinas," explained Duke Energy spokesperson Ryan Wheeless. "Today it’s about 6%."

Duke Energy’s solar plant in Monroe has 600,000 panels and powers about 10,000 homes a year. Wheeless said North Carolina is fourth in the nation for solar power. He added about 42,000 homeowners have roof solar panels in North Carolina.

For the latest breaking news, weather and traffic alerts, download the WCNC Charlotte mobile app and enable push notifications.

"What you’re gonna see in the future is Duke Energy building more of these solar facilities," Wheeless said. He added Duke Energy recently signed contracts for 15 more solar panel plants across the country.

According to Wheeless, Duke Energy gets most of its solar panels from large manufacturers in southeast Asia.

"It'd be better if the panels were manufactured closer to our home," Wheeless said.

Silfab Solar wants to meet that need. Silfab is inching closer to approval from York County leaders to move into an existing Fort Mill facility. The deal would create 800 full-time jobs. The manufacturer's corporate office is in Ontario, Canada, but its website says its panels are exclusively made in the U.S.

Nearby, neighbors support clean energy but worry about the traffic the business would create on US-21.

"Everything over there is a one lane road in each direction," Fort Mill resident George Maloney said. "It’s going to add a lot of volume."

The facility is near land currently being cleared for future Fort Mill schools, which concerns neighbor Danielle Graham.

You can stream WCNC Charlotte on Roku, Amazon Fire TV and Apple TV, just download the free app.

"It's just a little too dangerous," Graham said. "It needs to sit in a rural area where it's got a buffer zone."

Graham said community members have raised several questions about air and water quality impacts the manufacturing facility could have and they're still waiting to be answered.

As more homeowners and energy suppliers in the Carolinas choose to soak up the sun for energy, Silfab Solar hopes to meet the demand. It’ll need one more vote of approval from York County leaders before moving forward.

The next York County Council meeting is on Sept. 5.

Fort Mill residents weigh in on solar manufacturing plant

FORT MILL, S.C. — York County Council gave the green light for a Silfab Solar manufacturing site to move into Fort Mill by granting it a tax break. However, the company still needs several state and county permits before setting up shop. Some people living in Fort Mill are worried about the impa...

FORT MILL, S.C. — York County Council gave the green light for a Silfab Solar manufacturing site to move into Fort Mill by granting it a tax break. However, the company still needs several state and county permits before setting up shop. Some people living in Fort Mill are worried about the impacts that kind of facility will have on water and air quality.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: York County leaders approve major business deals

HAPs, or hazardous air pollutants, are a major cause of concern -- and the reason behind a public hearing Monday night to hear from neighbors.

York County Council moved ahead with giving Silfab Solar a tax break to move in before any report was given from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC).

"Don’t expect this board to hold up a fee in lieu based off what DHEC is yet to determine," York County Councilman William "Bump" Roddey said in the September meeting.

Silfab Solar still needs permits from DHEC before it can begin operations. The agency held a public hearing Monday night as it reviews the company's air pollutant permit application.

The plant would be located behind the DMV and near two future public schools in Fort Mill on Logistics Lane, which is off US-21.

"Our children are going to be in those schools so when they get to be 50 and 60 they can look forward to cancer and dying quicker right" one woman asked in the Monday meeting with the Department of Health and Environmental Control.

RELATED: Solar panel manufacturer eyeing Fort Mill facility

Residents concerned about the toxic chemicals that would be coming in and out of the plant are hoping their input can stop operations before they begin.

"I think you guys should have a lot better oversight and quite frankly should know better than to put that next to a school," another attendee said to the DHEC experts holding the meeting.

Permit writer David Nasol explained to the crowd the analysis DHEC conducted on what Silfab Solar's emissions would be. He added the company would be held to federal emission regulations if granted a permit.

"Silfab Solar is proposing to install two wet acid scrubbers to control hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid emissions," Nasol explained. He said DHEC's analysis found Silfab Solar's emissions would be way under the yearly federal limit, but neighbors are still very skeptical.

"What is the plan if God forbid the worst scenario happens," a concerned resident asked. Many attendees were upset Silfab Solar hasn’t created an emergency plan yet. DHEC said one will be required before toxic chemicals are onsite.

The agency doesn’t have a deadline for deciding whether to approve or deny the permit but said it will do so in a timely fashion. Silfab Solar needs wastewater and construction permits as well. DHEC said the county is reviewing those applications.

DHEC is accepting public comments via email to AirPNComments@dhec.sc.gov until this Friday, Nov. 3.

A $106 million sale sets new high mark for properties in the Rock Hill region

The Rock Hill region has a new high-dollar mark among its biggest listed property sales. Plus dozens more in October that hit seven or eight figures.A $106 million sale in Fort Mill is now the highest figure listed by online land records in York County. It involves property near Carowinds.In April, the Herald reported that two warehouse sites on David Hutchison Road in Rock Hill sold for what at the time was the highest amount listed in online county land records, at $93.3 million.The 58-acre former Randolph Yarns Park s...

The Rock Hill region has a new high-dollar mark among its biggest listed property sales. Plus dozens more in October that hit seven or eight figures.

A $106 million sale in Fort Mill is now the highest figure listed by online land records in York County. It involves property near Carowinds.

In April, the Herald reported that two warehouse sites on David Hutchison Road in Rock Hill sold for what at the time was the highest amount listed in online county land records, at $93.3 million.

The 58-acre former Randolph Yarns Park site topped the 2017 LPL Financial headquarters sale in Fort Mill at $88.4 million, the 2021 Capital Club apartment sale in Indian Land for $88 million and two $80 million-plus sales last year in Rock Hill and Chester County.

Three Logistics Lane properties in Fort Mill sold Oct. 4 for $106 million. The 7107, 7145 and 7149 Logistics Lane addresses combine for more than 70 acres and have two warehouse buildings at more than 1 million combined square feet.

Pennsylvania-based EQT Exeter bought Stateline 77 which includes the Silfab Solar site in the larger of the two buildings at 7149 Logistics Lane. Silfab and York County finalized a tax incentive deal this fall that projects a $150 million investment and 800 new jobs.

A smaller building at 7107 Logistics Lane has two tenants, Element Designs and Motion Industries. Both buildings were constructed last year.

Real estate developer Rockefeller Group acquired the property in 2019 for almost $8.5 million.

The Logistics Lane site was the biggest, but far from the only million-dollar sale last month in the Rock Hill region. Here, according to county land records, are all the other seven-figure or more deals in York, Lancaster and Chester counties:

? The Graybul Mason company out of Greenville bought The Mason at Six Mile Creek apartment building in Lancaster County for almost $69.3 million. The Indian Land site built in 2020 and 2021 includes seven buildings that combine for almost 300,000 square feet of apartment space on Charlotte Highway or U.S. 521, north of S.C. 160.

? More than 60 lots in the new Elizabeth subdivision in Fort Mill sold Oct. 6 for over $8.5 million. The Turkey Roost Road, Runner Stone Lane and Virginia Trail Court addresses are the latest phase of a community that will have more than 1,300 residences along with commercial development along Fort Mill Parkway.

? More than 132 acres at 111 Cinder Hills Dr. in Lake Wylie sold Oct. 23 for almost $7.3 million. Homebuilder D.R. Horton bought the property from South Fork Ventures. It’s east of Big Allison Creek and Daimler Boulevard, off Charlotte Highway. It’s across that main highway from 260 more acres owned by the builder as part of the 840-home Westport project.

? A more than 15,000-square-foot Walgreens store at 1645 Cranium Dr. in Rock Hill sold Oct. 13 for almost $6.3 million. A company out of Zebulon, North Carolina, bought the property off Heckle Boulevard, just east of Herlong Avenue.

? A combination of 40 vacant residential addresses on Berryman Road, Bly Street and Ginsberg Road in Rock Hill sold Oct. 27 for almost $4.9 million. They are part of the Allston townhomes project. The undeveloped property is on Herlong Avenue, north of Clarendon Place. It also has a commercial side to include a new Chipotle.

? Almost 650 acres on Bethel Boat Landing and the Catawba River in Lancaster County sold Oct. 25 for more than $4.6 million. B&C Land Holdings and Red Pill Land Holdings out of Weddington, North Carolina, bought property in and around Edgewater Golf Club.

? Ridgewood Chester bought the Chester Homes community at 200 York Street in Chester on Oct. 17 for $3.1 million. The property includes more than a dozen residential structures.

? Almost 7 acres at 9831 Barberville Road in Indian Land sold Oct. 2 for $2.7 million. Barbverville Developers out of Lexington bought the Lancaster County property zoned for business use. It includes an 1,800-square-foot home built in 1975. It’s just east of Sugar Creek and the York County line.

? Almost 3 acres of vacant commercial property near Carowinds in Fort Mill sold Oct. 16 for $2.2 million. Neelkanth Hospitality out of Indian Land bought the Cabelas Drive parcel near Interstate 77. Prior owner Cabela’s Wholesale Inc. applied with York County this summer to rezone the property to allow a four-story, 107-room hotel.

? International Machinery Sales out of Roswell, Georgia bought almost 10 acres of light industrial property at 1320 Camp Creek Road in Lancaster County. The Oct. 27 sale for $2.1 million includes a more than 57,000-square-foot warehouse building.

? An almost 2,400-square-foot commercial property at 2889 Hwy. 160 West near Tega Cay sold Oct. 19 for more than $1.8 million. A Society Hill company bought the site at Gold Hill and S.C. 160 that was a former gas station.

? A dozen vacant residential properties on Valita Road, Treetop Court and Gray Shadow Court in Lake Wylie sold Oct. 23 for more than $1.6 million. A Florida company bought the fourth phase Gentry at Handsmill lots.

? A 10,000-square-foot industrial building at 4990 Old York Road in Rock Hill sold Oct. 10 for almost $1.5 million. The 2006 construction sits between Old York and a rail line, east of Miller Pond Road.

? A 335-acre site at 3370 Rocky Road in York sold Oct. 20 for almost $1.4 million. Silver Lining Investments out of York bought the vacant residential property from Wateree Holdings. It’s in the Bethany area with access off Black Highway and CE Stewart Road.

? A combined 20 residential properties on Switch Street and Candela Court in York sold Oct. 27 for more than $1.3 million. True Homes bought the Wilkerson Place neighborhood sites just west of York Electric Cooperative headquarters.

? Three Lynwood Drive properties in Lancaster County sold Oct. 11 for almost $1.3 million. They combine for 130 acres south of Lancaster, between Lynwood and McIlwain Road. B&C Land Holdings bought the property. The property is a mix of residential and agricultural zoning.

? Charlotte-based 2427 Partners bought the Jasmine Grill Mediterranean food site at 2476 Cherry Road in Rock Hill on Oct. 6 for $1.3 million. The fast food restaurant building was built in 2005.

? A vacant property at 225 Trelawn St. in Fort Mill sold Oct. 12 for more than $1 million. The lot is part of Enclave at Massey.

? Almost 20 acres at 1444 and 1282 Camp Creek Road in Lancaster County sold Oct. 27 for just more than $1 million. The properties have more than 60,000 square feet of light industrial construction on them. International Machinery Sales bought the sites.

The region, mainly York County, also saw individual home sales at $1 million or more. There were 10 such sales in October, the same number as in September. A small stretch of Lake Wylie north of S.C. 49 from Blucher Circle to Bonum Road accounts for four of them.

Combined, the 10 homes sold for $1 million or more last month total almost $13.8 million.

Use the map below for details on the large home sales. Blue icons are the most recent.

Fort Mill using $25M from SC to move public works department out of historic armory

FORT MILL — Fort Mill leaders say they are using $25 million in state tax money to build a new home for its public works and utilities departments so they can move out of a nearly century-old former National Guard armory building, which will undergo repairs.S.C. Rep. Raye Felder, R-Fort Mill, secured one of the largest earmarks in the 2022-23 state budget approved this month.“Six years ago it became a mission of mine to find out how you go about getting funding for a building that will cost way more money to renovat...

FORT MILL — Fort Mill leaders say they are using $25 million in state tax money to build a new home for its public works and utilities departments so they can move out of a nearly century-old former National Guard armory building, which will undergo repairs.

S.C. Rep. Raye Felder, R-Fort Mill, secured one of the largest earmarks in the 2022-23 state budget approved this month.

“Six years ago it became a mission of mine to find out how you go about getting funding for a building that will cost way more money to renovate than to raze it and start over,” Felder said at a June 27 news conference in front of the historic brick building on East Elliott Street.

The armory was erected in 1938 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

It also has been used as a public space for dances and as a school gymnasium. The town moved its utilities operations there in 2011, but that’s been the same time span that Fort Mill has experienced significant growth, Town Manager Davy Broom said.

“We have had a third-party review of our facilities and to no surprise, it said we have outgrown the facility,” Mayor Guynn Savage said.

That’s why the town will use some of the money to buy land on Banks Road near Sparkling Brook Parkway for a new operations center. It’s a better spot for public works and utilities, compared to the former armory, which is adjacent to a cemetery and some homes.

“There’s no access to larger roadways” from the armory, Savage said. “There’s little opportunity for buffering and the land doesn’t allow for more acreage.”

Town leaders will continue to seek money to complete renovation of the armory, while determining the best use for it. Savage said one possible role for the building could be a center for arts shows and/or theatre performances.

NORTH CHARLESTON — An episode of the “Twilight Zone” ends with actor Art Carney’s character wishing he could play Santa Claus every year.

Timothy “Colorado” Davis has that same wish, and he was willing to lose his day job for it.

“Santa gives me the opportunity to be who I want to be,” the 60-year-old Chester County resident and Rock Hill native said. “I get to spread joy.”

Unlike the story told in the episode, “Night of the Meek,” Davis has needed much more than 30 minutes and a compact Hollywood script to make this dream happen. It also involved a write-in campaign in support of him as a Chester County school teacher.

Visitors to the Northwoods Mall in North Charleston will find Davis in his red-and-white hat and his thick white beard. He started his one-month stint as Santa on November 22 — by chance, his birthday. He’ll be there through Christmas Eve.

After Christmas, Davis said he was hoping he could return to his day job, teaching Earth science at Lewisville Middle School in Richburg in Chester County. Instead, he said he made a definitive choice to step away from the classroom for the temporary job as Santa.

He’s had a few opportunities to play Santa in recent years, including at a program for the Charlotte Symphony. This year, Davis wanted a longer stint as Saint Nicklaus and sought out a mall Santa job.

It would take a significant amount of time away from the classroom, however. Last summer, he said he notified the Chester County School District that he would need 17 school days off in November and December.

“I was willing to have my pay docked, I was willing to teach summer school, which I’ve done in the past,” Davis said. “I wish we could have worked something out.”

Months passed, and he did not receive approval for the time off.

On the approach to Thanksgiving, Davis said he was resolute about his commitment to becoming Santa. Prior to the Thanksgiving break, he let his students know he would be away when they returned after the break, and why he might not be back in class even after Christmas break.

Davis said he continued to communicate with the school district about returning to the job, but taking the time off unexcused meant he would likely be terminated.

“I understand it is a policy break,” he said. “I’m breaking that.”

He submitted his immediate resignation on November 29. He’d like to teach elsewhere, but his teaching license is in jeopardy based on how the district handles his resignation.

“Acceptance of a professional employee’s resignation is within the sole discretion of the superintendent and will be based upon the needs of the district,” wrote Wendell Sumter, Chester County assistant superintendent of human resources, in response to Davis’ resignation.

Davis said he may not know until the spring whether the resignation is accepted.

“When the superintendent does not accept a resignation and the employee fails to continue to perform his/her contractual duties,” Sumter’s letter continued, “the board may vote to report such breach to the state board of education and request that appropriate action be taken against the employee for unprofessional conduct. State law and state board of education regulation provide for the suspension or revocation of a professional certificate for a period of up to one calendar year under such circumstances.”

The district’s marketing and communications office confirmed Davis is no longer an employee.

Davis was disappointed he couldn’t get the time off approved. As it turned out, so were some of his students and their families.

In one case, Barbara Westbrook, grandmother of a few students at Lewisville, said she was compelled to start a Change.org campaign in mid-November to save Davis’ job.

“It struck me as so unfair,” said Westbrook, who was unfamiliar with the petition website but hopped on it nonetheless based on a recommendation. And she started it before she had even met the teacher.

As of December 15, more than 4,300 people had signed the petition.

“Mr. Davis is a well-loved teacher who brings science alive to his students with many hands-on experiences, indoors and outdoors,” Westbrook wrote in the petition.

Davis himself said the Change.org campaign had been up a few days before he was aware of it. It was shared across social media, and the blogging site The Lantern also reported it.

“I knew some parents locally would make a fuss, but I never thought it would be this big a deal,” he said. “I never expected this to come about.”

The petition failed to keep Davis at Lewisburg Middle School. It succeeded at rallying many former students and acquaintances to voice their appreciation for the 33-year veteran instructor.

“I’m blessed that a lot of people have reached out,” he said.

Meanwhile, playing Santa is his outreach.

That episode of “The Twilight Zone” concludes with the main character getting his wish to be Santa Claus every year. One morning before his Santa shift, Davis said he rewatched the episode.

“I couldn’t pass this up,” Davis said. “I would love to make a living at this. I’m not the best Santa, but I’m the best I can be at being Santa.”

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.