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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Goose Creek, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Goose Creek:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

Charleston Co. approves six greenbelt funding projects, investing more than $7 million in green space

Charleston County continues to invest in its greenbelt program working to protect natural spaces throughout the county.CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County continues to invest in its greenbelt program working to protect natural spaces throughout the county. Last week, the county council approved more than $7 million in tax money for six recent and upcoming projects.Eric Davis, Director of Greenbelt Programs for Charleston County, explains the county money is often matched by city or other funds to accomplish the l...

Charleston County continues to invest in its greenbelt program working to protect natural spaces throughout the county.

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County continues to invest in its greenbelt program working to protect natural spaces throughout the county. Last week, the county council approved more than $7 million in tax money for six recent and upcoming projects.

Eric Davis, Director of Greenbelt Programs for Charleston County, explains the county money is often matched by city or other funds to accomplish the land purchase.

“It really takes three partners, an applicant who’s identified the property, they want to protect the landowner, and then the county helps fund that protection,” Davis says.

Of the six projects approved, two of them are on Edisto Island, two are in North Charleston, one is on Folly Beach and one is in Hollywood. These projects range in size and cost, from a few thousand dollars for a few acres, to a few million for hundreds of acres.

“We had everything from small pocket parks on Folly Beach to large tracts down on Edisto Island. It’s definitely important not only to preserve future green space and areas that aren’t developed yet, but also provide those outdoor recreation and public green spaces in our more densely developed areas as well,” Davis says.

Jason Crowley with the Coastal Conservation League says one large tract in North Charleston is particularly exciting because it is more than 400 acres that will impact people all the way down the Cooper River. The Ingleside Tract will be public park land near Wannamaker Park with the potential to connect the two.

“It will be a complimentary expansion of that park area, which has a really important resilience component as well because there are headwaters to Goose Creek that flow through there. They start there and go under I-26 and over through the city of Goose Creek into the reservoir and then after that the county park the into the Cooper River,” Crowley says. “It’ll also reduce the potential impact of flooding in neighboring areas by not having the any sort of threats of development upstream that would then cause exacerbation downstream.”

The county funding for these projects comes from the one percent transportation and greenbelt sales tax that people in the county voted for in 2016. The six projects, their cost to the county and plans are outlined below.

Sumner Avenue in North Charleston cost to the county - $156,870

Botany Bay Heritage Preserve Expansion on Edisto Island - $2,027,030

Church Flatts Batter in Hollywood - $275,000

Horres Park on Folly Beach - $385,000

Ingleside Weber Park – North Charleston $4,007,500

Keefe – Kinlaw Scenic Buffer Edisto Island - $30,000

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek to name city’s new amphitheater after state lawmaker

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Goose Creek unveiled an amphitheater in honor of S.C. Rep. Joe Daning in a surprise presentation Tuesday during his retirement celebration in Goose Creek.Joseph Daning is a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 92. He also was a Goose Creek City Council member for over 20 years and previous Goose Creek Mayor Pro Tempore.Daning will retire from the S.C. House of Representatives in January 2023. Multiple former S.C. representatives, Mayor Gregory Habib,...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Goose Creek unveiled an amphitheater in honor of S.C. Rep. Joe Daning in a surprise presentation Tuesday during his retirement celebration in Goose Creek.

Joseph Daning is a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 92. He also was a Goose Creek City Council member for over 20 years and previous Goose Creek Mayor Pro Tempore.

Daning will retire from the S.C. House of Representatives in January 2023. Multiple former S.C. representatives, Mayor Gregory Habib, U.S. Rep. Nancy Mace and Daning’s family and friends attended the celebration.

All the speakers who gathered at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church spoke about Daning’s long-lasting legacy in the city, Statehouse and House of Representatives.

“He was such a great friend and a mentor and very loyal to the Lowcountry,” Nancy Mace, U.S. House of Representative, said. “It was an honor to see that the Joseph Daning amphitheater was unveiled today in Goose Creek and that’s exciting for the residents of Goose Creek too and I want to thank Mayor Habib for that effort.”

The Joseph S. Daning Amphitheater will be located at the Municipal Center Campus near the Recreation Complex and the lake behind City Hall. It plans to include an outside basketball court, a food truck area, restrooms and additional parking.

Crystal Reed, the recreation director for the City of Goose Creek, says some examples of events that will be held at the amphitheater are slam poetry, improv, concerts and movie nights.

“I think the goal of the amphitheater and the projects that we’re doing in the city of Goose Creek is to bring entertainment into our city so that residents don’t have to travel and create more traffic,” Reed said. “They can get good dining options and good entertainment here in the city of Goose Creek.”

Reed says this project will break ground in April 2023 and it should take about 18 months to complete.

When Mayor Habib introduced the new amphitheater, Daning began to cry in shock.

“I didn’t expect any of this and then the new that,” Daning said, pointing to the picture of the proposed amphitheater. “You know, my father came from the Philippines. I am first generation. I mean this is just unbelievable. You know, I never expected any of this.”

The total cost of the amphitheater will be about $4 million. Daning secured $1.5 million in state funding and the remainder will be paid by ARPA funds.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Election Day: No big surprises

Election Day has come and gone with little drama, locally. The area voted as expected, most local leaders kept their seats and will continue to serve.Numbers from the South Carolina Election Commission show that in Berkeley County, roughly 48 percent of those 149,091 registered cast a vote. There were 71,983 ballots cast.Some of those were early voters at three locations offered. Between Oct. 24 until Nov. 5, at the county office in Moncks Corner, there 12,037 early voters. The Hanahan Library had 7,366 voters and the St. Steph...

Election Day has come and gone with little drama, locally. The area voted as expected, most local leaders kept their seats and will continue to serve.

Numbers from the South Carolina Election Commission show that in Berkeley County, roughly 48 percent of those 149,091 registered cast a vote. There were 71,983 ballots cast.

Some of those were early voters at three locations offered. Between Oct. 24 until Nov. 5, at the county office in Moncks Corner, there 12,037 early voters. The Hanahan Library had 7,366 voters and the St. Stephen Library had 1,843 early voters.

Unofficial results show from the election commission shows three referendums crucial in getting money for schools, roads and conservation were given the thumbs- up by voters in Berkeley County. The penny sales tax which has been extended will continue to generate funds for the next seven years. Some work being competed so far with the money is the entrance and exit in Cane Bay, Railroad Avenue in Hanahan. Henry Brown Blvd. and various dirt-to-pave projects.

It was first adopted in 2008 and is used to ease the county’s growing pains with work that has long been overdue.

“The voters have made their voice heard by agreeing to continue funding our County’s successful One-Cent Sales Tax Program another seven years,” said Supervisor Johnny Cribb. “This vote has ensured the completion of additional critical road and infrastructure projects across our area and will ultimately help reduce traffic and improve quality of life for all citizens.”

The unofficial results show Supervisor Cribb being elected to a second term. He got the win over challenger Tory Liferidge.

A penny tax will also continue for schools. The Educational Capital Improvements Referendum was passed. The money raised goes towards building new schools and updating existing facilities.

The other is Berkeley County’s Transportation and Green Space Referendum. A portion of that money goes towards conservation.

“In poll after poll, voters say Berkeley County is growing too fast, leading to record losses of open space and wildlife habitat, polluting our rivers and lakes, and threatening our quality of life,” said John Tynan Executive Director of Conservation Voters of South Carolina

“With today’s [Nov. 8], overwhelming YES vote on the transportation and greenspace referendum, Berkeley County voters sent a resounding message that they value their quality of life and the environment,” he said in a statement.

The incumbents being challenged on County Council won as well. Both district four’s Tommy Newell and district 8’s Steve Davis will keep their seats.

Goose Creek Mayor Greg Habib easily won against his opponent Mike Delany.

“Thank you to the citizens of Goose Creek for such a decisive win,” said Habib on social media. “I believe in what we’re doing and the direction of our city.”

He also added that he looks forward to moving ahead with council members. The body will have a new, but familiar face with challenger Chris Harmon winning his, at-large bid.

The Berkeley County School District will two new members with both Jimmy Hinson and Joe Baker defeating their challengers.

Goose Creek mayor defends development after resident concerns

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Goose Creek resident Lisa Berry has lived in the West Greenview Acres neighborhood since 2004. She describes her neighborhood as “pretty quiet,” besides occasional traffic.She found out about a planned development that could be built right next to her home and was taken aback. To her understanding, a road was going to run adjacent to her home and go to Red Bank Road, and a playground with a parking lot was going to be built on the other side of her property. She said those plans were concerning....

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Goose Creek resident Lisa Berry has lived in the West Greenview Acres neighborhood since 2004. She describes her neighborhood as “pretty quiet,” besides occasional traffic.

She found out about a planned development that could be built right next to her home and was taken aback. To her understanding, a road was going to run adjacent to her home and go to Red Bank Road, and a playground with a parking lot was going to be built on the other side of her property. She said those plans were concerning.

She posted in a Facebook group for Goose Creek residents, trying to inform her neighbors about what was going on. She said she was inspired to speak up; and said there should be no more construction.

“I was driving down Red Bank Road, and by the rural fire department, they have a marquee; it’s a flashing sign that changes,” Berry said. “It said, ‘if not you, then who?”

Berry’s post got the attention of Mayor Greg Habib, who responded in his own post in the group. He said he felt the need to give an explanation about what their processes are, what they are trying to accomplish, and how growth is important.

Berry met with the mayor Wednesday morning, and she discovered that there was an updated plan. She said that now instead of a road next to her house, it is proposed to be a walking trail, and the playground plans have changed as well. Habib said it is going to be a mix of townhomes and single-family homes with a commercial element on Red Bank Road.

One of the concerns that Berry had was that the property floods. Habib said the only way the flooding problems are going to go away is if someone develops the property properly.

“I knew it had a flooding problem,” Habib said. “We told the developer when he first came to us, you have to address flooding in this area if you’re gonna do anything here, and what the developer has proposed is a stormwater plan that actually takes water from off the property onto his own property to mitigate the flooding problems that are there now.”

Now Berry said she is not opposed to development but wants it to be done in a smart way.

“We have to change,” Berry said. “We can’t just stay the same. I just want it to be an informed decision where all citizens understand what’s going on and can voice their concerns, and if we don’t share that information then people are left out.”

It is not the first time that development concerns have been expressed in rapidly growing Goose Creek, or in the Lowcountry. Goose Creek is now the 8th largest city in South Carolina.

“We’re 47,000 people,” Habib said. “We are not a small town in small-town America anymore.”

Habib said he often hears concerns about traffic issues. He said the greatest tool to reduce traffic is economic development and putting people and businesses closer together.

“We got traffic here,” Habib said. “How do you mitigate that? Well, understanding that not building anymore is not an option, so how do you then mitigate it there is your plan for it, you do it right, and you do it in a way that makes sense.”

Habib said there are over 5,000 homes entitled to go up in the city. Habib said some of those are going to create more traffic than others because they are on the outskirts of the city. Until there is commercial development there, those people will have to drive into the main commercial section of the city to get what they need. He said they need to get commercial development out to those areas as fast as they can to mitigate the traffic.

“If we’re gonna build houses, which we know we have to, we’re going to insist developers to build communities,” Habib said.

Habib said they cannot sit by as development happens. Instead, they need to participate in it and make it look like what they want it to be.

There will be a public hearing regarding the aforementioned planned development on July 5 at 6 p.m. at City Hall.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek to break ground on new $9 million park

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Re...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.

The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.

Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.

“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Reed said. “We’re on a wellness mission, and inclusivity is our top priority.”

The park will be funded by just over $4 million in coronavirus relief money, $1.5 million from the city’s general fund and just under $3.5 million from hospitality taxes.

Reed said with that money, the park will be loaded with features.

“We’ll have a sand volleyball court, basketball court,” she said. “It will have a greenspace with a stage with a food truck area, so that people can have social gatherings.”

Other features in the park include pickleball courts, a pavilion that will host events and an all-inclusive playground for kids of all ages and abilities.

Sean June lives in Goose Creek and came out to play basketball with his friends next to where Central Creek Park will be. He said he can’t wait for it to be built.

“I was actually kind of shocked because I was talking to my friends,” he said. “I thought they were going to put apartments over there, but it will be a nice addition to the community.”

June also said he plans on using the basketball courts and the food truck area once the park eventually opens.

“Every weekend, there’s always a bunch of people behind playing basketball,” he said. “I’m pretty sure it’s a big staple in our community to have parks.”

Reed said the city’s focus on building parks, such as the recently opened John McCants Veterans Park, is to make sure people can get together outdoors.

“It’s really just a focus on creating community,” Reed said. “That’s why we’re doing it. We want people to have activities and places to go in their city where they don’t have to leave the city limits of Goose Creek.”

Officials said the groundbreaking is scheduled for March 31. That’s when they will reveal how this park will take shape.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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