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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Goose Creek, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Goose Creek:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

Minority leader positions at risk on the Berkeley Co. School Board

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School Board could face difficulty with representation, re-election and diversity for this upcoming election season.That is according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Goose Creek branch.A new law passed back in May called S910 will force two of the school board’s minority leaders to run against each other due to redistricting.School board members, educators, pastors and members of the Berkeley County community raise concerns at the Goos...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School Board could face difficulty with representation, re-election and diversity for this upcoming election season.

That is according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Goose Creek branch.

A new law passed back in May called S910 will force two of the school board’s minority leaders to run against each other due to redistricting.

School board members, educators, pastors and members of the Berkeley County community raise concerns at the Goose Creek NAACP emergency meeting about how this will affect Berkeley County School Board elections.

Reverend Nelson B. Rivers III, the pastor of Charity Missionary Baptist Church, says he wants to stay away from the political aspect and focus on doing what is right for the educators and students.

“We have to speak truth to power,” Rivers said. “Without worrying about whether it’s political. This is not politics. It has a political outcome, but this is not politics.”

David Barrow, the board chair for Berkeley County School District, says the board did not work closely with the lawmakers who passed this bill. He says the majority of the board does not support the changes.

“The current chair rejects this,” Barrow said. “Never have supported this because it’s wrong, and it’s not fair to the other members, and it’s against our policy.”

Barrow also says under the new law, leaders in odd-numbered districts elected in 2020 will have to run again this November and again in 2024. Those in even-numbered districts will keep their original four-year term without re-election.

Sharina Haynes, president of the NAACP Goose Creek branch, says they want the community to stay informed.

“I just want to encourage the community to know about the bills that are coming in through our Senate and House,” Haynes said. “Making sure that we have a voice and making sure that we are holding our elected officials accountable.”

She also wants people to realize how important this state law is when voting this year.

“You know, everyone focuses on the federal level, but state laws and state elections, those are the things that have so much impact on our communities, and it’s so important for us to keep engaged even in the midst of a pandemic,” Haynes said.

The Goose Creek NAACP branch says they fully support the BCSD school board’s stance on this issue. They also say they encourage everyone to attend the BCSD board meeting on July 26 to get involved and stay informed.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Where can I watch 4th of July fireworks in the Lowcountry?

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – After dealing with a global pandemic for more than two years, the Charleston community is brimming with activities to help you celebrate our country’s independence.While the weather may be a little dicey at times, with rain plaguing the weekend forecast, things look to be mostly dry on Monday. So, you can expect most fireworks shows to blast off without issue.Below, you’ll find a complete guide to all local events to help you celebrate Independence Day.Heading to the beaches? &...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – After dealing with a global pandemic for more than two years, the Charleston community is brimming with activities to help you celebrate our country’s independence.

While the weather may be a little dicey at times, with rain plaguing the weekend forecast, things look to be mostly dry on Monday. So, you can expect most fireworks shows to blast off without issue.

Below, you’ll find a complete guide to all local events to help you celebrate Independence Day.

Heading to the beaches? ‘Salute From the Shore’ returns to the South Carolina coast. Beachgoers can enjoy F-16s from McEntire Joint National Guard Base as well as C-17s out of Joint Base Charleston as they fly over the beach between 1:00 p.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Pawleys Island: F-16s around 1:06 p.m., followed by C-17s around 1:14 p.m.

Isle of Palms: F-16s around 1:15 p.m., followed by C-17s around 1:29 p.m.

Charleston Harbor: F-16s around 1:16 p.m., followed by C-17s around 11:32 p.m.

Folly Beach: F-16s around 1:20 p.m., followed by C-17s around 1:35 p.m.

Edisto Island: F-16s around 1:24 p.m., followed by C-17s around 1:41 p.m.

FOLLY BEACH

Celebrate the 4th of July with fireworks on Folly Beach. The fireworks begin at sundown and will be visible anywhere on Folly Beach.

Fireworks will be launched from 3rd Block West – leaders say the parking area and beach area at 3rd Block West will be closed to visitors from 10:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m. and a beach sweep will be conducted immediately following the show to remove any debris.

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND

Enjoy a 4th of July golf cart and bike parade, which begins at Sunrise Presbyterian Church and ends at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School and begins shortly after 8:30 a.m.

The Independence Day party at the park and fireworks will return after a multi-year absence. The event begins at 5:30 p.m.; guests should bring a chair or blanket. Music will be provided by the Shem Creek Boogie Band and fireworks will begin at 9:00 p.m.

No dogs will be allowed in the park at the time of the show and alcohol will not be prohibited.

ISLE OF PALMS

A golf cart parade will take place at 10:00 a.m. and the city’s firework show will happen at 9:00 p.m. at the Front Beach area.

KIAWAH ISLAND

Celebrate Independence Day at Night Heron Park with a bike parade and fireworks show! Festivities include live music, carnival games, inflatables, and a watermelon eating contest. Fireworks will begin at 9:15 p.m.

Food and beverage tickets will be on sale at the park starting at 4:00 p.m. Admission to the festival is free, no coolers are allowed.

MOUNT PLEASANT

There are two events happening on July 4 in the Town of Mount Pleasant. Ticketed guests will have a grand view of fireworks from the flight deck of the USS Yorktown for their annual ‘Fireworks Blast.’ Those who did not secure a ticket can bring their lawn chairs and blankets to watch the firework show for free on the landside.

Guests watching landside can enjoy live music, and access to more than a dozen food trucks and fireworks show above Charleston Harbor after sundown.

Parking will be $20 per vehicle.

Meanwhile, the Uncle Sam Jam will take place at the Mount Pleasant Pier. Live music from Dave Landeo and The Sol Beats will begin at 7:30 p.m., plus you’ll have a great view of the fireworks.

CHARLESTON

Enjoy America’s pastime at The Joe! This is the first time the RiverDogs have played a home game on the 4th of July since 2018. Ballpark guests can enjoy a game, beginning at 6:35 p.m., followed by fireworks.

The South Carolina Aquarium will host perfect viewing of fireworks over Charleston Harbor. The Aquarium’s ‘Sea Stars and Stripes’ is a family-friendly and all-inclusive event with cookout fare, beer and wine, and more. Bring a chair or blanket to watch fireworks over the Aquarium decks. The event begins at 7:00 p.m.

NORTH CHARLESTON

The City of North Charleston’s annual Fourth of July Festival will take place at Riverfront Park from 5:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m.

There will be live music and nearly 30 food trucks at the event. Fireworks will begin at 9:00 p.m.

Entry and parking will be free to the public. Guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets as seating will not be provided.

Those attending will not be allowed into the park until 5:00 p.m., all bags will be searched, and no grills will be allowed in the park during the festival. Guests cannot bring sparklers or outside fireworks to the event.

GOOSE CREEK

The City of Goose Creek’s annual Independence Day celebration and fireworks show, Fabulous Fourth in the Creek, is set for Monday, July 4th.

The event, which takes place at the Goose Creek Municipal Park, will include live music, food and alcohol vendors, and free activities for children.

Admission and parking are free; however, parking is limited so city leaders ask people to carpool when possible. Outside fireworks, sparklers, or alcohol are prohibited.

SUMMERVILLE

Summerville’s Fireworks and Freedom Festival will take place at Gahagan Park from 5:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m.

Admission is free. The family-friendly event will include live music, food, drinks, fireworks, a kid’s zone, and plenty of fun.

Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets, umbrellas, and water. You can bring small lunch box-sized personal coolers; however, large coolers are not allowed. Neither are pets, tents, or personal fireworks, grills, or alcohol.

EVENT PARKING DETAILS:

Onsite parking at Gahagan Park is extremely limited. Handicapped parking will be available directly next to the event in the front lot located off of W. Boundary St. Additional parking is also available in the open field behind the Gahagan Park Playground (enter from and exit onto W. Boundary St.). Parking is not permitted along Butler St. or W. Boundary St. Attendees are encouraged to carpool to the event or park offsite and ride the shuttles provided.

SHUTTLE INFO: Shuttles will run on a constant loop between one offsite parking location and Gahagan Park starting at 5 p.m. and continuing through 10 p.m.

Shuttle Stop Location: Summerville Town Hall Parking Lot, 200 S. Main St. The shuttle will pick up/ drop off near the fountain area of the Town Hall Parking Lot. You can park in the garage or anywhere else in Downtown Summerville and walk to meet the shuttle at this stop.

Lowcountry running club determined to save Danny Jones Park track

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Members of the Park Circle Pacers running club recently found out that the track at Danny Jones Park will be demolished later this year. Now, they’re doing everything in their power to save the park.“I was shocked when I first heard the news about them tearing down the track,” North Charleston resident Michelle Huntley said.Many Lowcountry runners are surprised to learn North Charleston has plans to get rid of the track at Danny Jones Park.“We reached out to t...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Members of the Park Circle Pacers running club recently found out that the track at Danny Jones Park will be demolished later this year. Now, they’re doing everything in their power to save the park.

“I was shocked when I first heard the news about them tearing down the track,” North Charleston resident Michelle Huntley said.

Many Lowcountry runners are surprised to learn North Charleston has plans to get rid of the track at Danny Jones Park.

“We reached out to the city,” Virginia Clauser, founder of the Park Circle Pacers, said, “the recreation department specifically, to see what we could find out about the plans for the track. We found out that currently, there are no plans for a track at all in the redesign.”

The Park Circle Pacers are fighting to preserve the track because it serves many people across the Tri-County area.

“There are runners from all over the community that come to use this track since it’s the only public track,” Park Circle Pacers vice president Dennis Long said. “There are people from Summerville, Goose Creek, West Ashley, Mount Pleasant.”

Neighbors who live in the area say they’re devastated as well.

“This is where I come to exercise,” Ericka Lowry said. “So, I don’t know what we’re going to do.”

Clauser says the track provides a safe environment for runners.

“There’s no cracks,” she said, “there’s no dogs running off leash, there’s no trees down. It’s well-lit and it’s public. So, it brings an element of safety.”

The running club started a petition that has now received more than 1000 signatures.

“We were told that the plans were not yet final,” Clauser said, “and so that being said, we started to raise awareness hoping that we could bring light to this issue.”

The club will also host a rally at the track next Tuesday.

“We’ve invited pretty much every runner in the community to come out and show support for our cause of saving the track,” Long said.

A link to sign the “Save the Track” petition can be found here.

Goose Creek to break ground on new $9 million park

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Re...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.

The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.

Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.

“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Reed said. “We’re on a wellness mission, and inclusivity is our top priority.”

The park will be funded by just over $4 million in coronavirus relief money, $1.5 million from the city’s general fund and just under $3.5 million from hospitality taxes.

Reed said with that money, the park will be loaded with features.

“We’ll have a sand volleyball court, basketball court,” she said. “It will have a greenspace with a stage with a food truck area, so that people can have social gatherings.”

Other features in the park include pickleball courts, a pavilion that will host events and an all-inclusive playground for kids of all ages and abilities.

Sean June lives in Goose Creek and came out to play basketball with his friends next to where Central Creek Park will be. He said he can’t wait for it to be built.

“I was actually kind of shocked because I was talking to my friends,” he said. “I thought they were going to put apartments over there, but it will be a nice addition to the community.”

June also said he plans on using the basketball courts and the food truck area once the park eventually opens.

“Every weekend, there’s always a bunch of people behind playing basketball,” he said. “I’m pretty sure it’s a big staple in our community to have parks.”

Reed said the city’s focus on building parks, such as the recently opened John McCants Veterans Park, is to make sure people can get together outdoors.

“It’s really just a focus on creating community,” Reed said. “That’s why we’re doing it. We want people to have activities and places to go in their city where they don’t have to leave the city limits of Goose Creek.”

Officials said the groundbreaking is scheduled for March 31. That’s when they will reveal how this park will take shape.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek mayor defends development after resident concerns

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Goose Creek resident Lisa Berry has lived in the West Greenview Acres neighborhood since 2004. She describes her neighborhood as “pretty quiet,” besides occasional traffic.She found out about a planned development that could be built right next to her home and was taken aback. To her understanding, a road was going to run adjacent to her home and go to Red Bank Road, and a playground with a parking lot was going to be built on the other side of her property. She said those plans were concerning....

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Goose Creek resident Lisa Berry has lived in the West Greenview Acres neighborhood since 2004. She describes her neighborhood as “pretty quiet,” besides occasional traffic.

She found out about a planned development that could be built right next to her home and was taken aback. To her understanding, a road was going to run adjacent to her home and go to Red Bank Road, and a playground with a parking lot was going to be built on the other side of her property. She said those plans were concerning.

She posted in a Facebook group for Goose Creek residents, trying to inform her neighbors about what was going on. She said she was inspired to speak up; and said there should be no more construction.

“I was driving down Red Bank Road, and by the rural fire department, they have a marquee; it’s a flashing sign that changes,” Berry said. “It said, ‘if not you, then who?”

Berry’s post got the attention of Mayor Greg Habib, who responded in his own post in the group. He said he felt the need to give an explanation about what their processes are, what they are trying to accomplish, and how growth is important.

Berry met with the mayor Wednesday morning, and she discovered that there was an updated plan. She said that now instead of a road next to her house, it is proposed to be a walking trail, and the playground plans have changed as well. Habib said it is going to be a mix of townhomes and single-family homes with a commercial element on Red Bank Road.

One of the concerns that Berry had was that the property floods. Habib said the only way the flooding problems are going to go away is if someone develops the property properly.

“I knew it had a flooding problem,” Habib said. “We told the developer when he first came to us, you have to address flooding in this area if you’re gonna do anything here, and what the developer has proposed is a stormwater plan that actually takes water from off the property onto his own property to mitigate the flooding problems that are there now.”

Now Berry said she is not opposed to development but wants it to be done in a smart way.

“We have to change,” Berry said. “We can’t just stay the same. I just want it to be an informed decision where all citizens understand what’s going on and can voice their concerns, and if we don’t share that information then people are left out.”

It is not the first time that development concerns have been expressed in rapidly growing Goose Creek, or in the Lowcountry. Goose Creek is now the 8th largest city in South Carolina.

“We’re 47,000 people,” Habib said. “We are not a small town in small-town America anymore.”

Habib said he often hears concerns about traffic issues. He said the greatest tool to reduce traffic is economic development and putting people and businesses closer together.

“We got traffic here,” Habib said. “How do you mitigate that? Well, understanding that not building anymore is not an option, so how do you then mitigate it there is your plan for it, you do it right, and you do it in a way that makes sense.”

Habib said there are over 5,000 homes entitled to go up in the city. Habib said some of those are going to create more traffic than others because they are on the outskirts of the city. Until there is commercial development there, those people will have to drive into the main commercial section of the city to get what they need. He said they need to get commercial development out to those areas as fast as they can to mitigate the traffic.

“If we’re gonna build houses, which we know we have to, we’re going to insist developers to build communities,” Habib said.

Habib said they cannot sit by as development happens. Instead, they need to participate in it and make it look like what they want it to be.

There will be a public hearing regarding the aforementioned planned development on July 5 at 6 p.m. at City Hall.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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