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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Goose Creek, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Goose Creek:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

$88M mixed-use development coming to Goose Creek community

A Tennessee-based commercial developer and investment company has secured financing for an $88 million project in Summerville.GBT Realty Corp. will build the latest housing development in Goose Creek in Summerville. GBT’s The Village at Carnes Crossroads brings 306 multifamily homes and over 11,000 square feet of retail to the heart of the Lowcountry lifestyle community, according to a news release.GBT acquired the 11.82-acre site earlier this month from Carnes Crossroads Association, the master developer of Carnes Crossr...

A Tennessee-based commercial developer and investment company has secured financing for an $88 million project in Summerville.

GBT Realty Corp. will build the latest housing development in Goose Creek in Summerville. GBT’s The Village at Carnes Crossroads brings 306 multifamily homes and over 11,000 square feet of retail to the heart of the Lowcountry lifestyle community, according to a news release.

GBT acquired the 11.82-acre site earlier this month from Carnes Crossroads Association, the master developer of Carnes Crossroads, according to a news release. JLL Capital Markets arranged construction financing with Bank of America and Meta Real Estate Partners. JLL’s Managing Directors Matt Stewart and Chip Sykes, and Director Wyatt Strahan represented GBT Realty.

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“This is a lifestyle community that epitomizes the best of southern living,” said Barry Yoeckel, vice president, multifamily development, GBT Realty, in the release. “The Village adds a living environment that appeals to young professionals, growing families and empty nesters alike. We designed and planned our community to enhance and connect with the surrounding Carnes Crossroads neighborhoods.”

The rental homes are located at the intersection of Highway 17-A and Third Avenue, immediately across from The Marketplace at Carnes Crossroads, a Publix-anchored mixed-use development that is currently under construction.

The development team includes Atlanta-based Dynamik Design, Thomas & Hutton (civil engineering) and Samet Corporation (general contractor).

“Our plans feature upscale homes and best-in-class amenities that stretch across 11 buildings on the site,” Yoeckel said.

Floorplans offer a mix of studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom units with upscale finishes, the release stated. Community amenities include separate small- and large-breed dog parks, a resort-style saltwater pool with lounge deck, an outdoor kitchen set on a community lawn, a club room with catering kitchen and golf stimulator, a state-of-the-art fitness complex and a co-working center. A coffee purveyor is set to bring classic specialties to The Village as well as the community at large.

The first units are expected to be available spring 2025.

A Brief History of Goose Creek

The city of Goose Creek is the most populated city in Berkley County. And with a tight-knit community, beautiful outdoor attractions and a great location with close proximity to Charleston, the city’s population continues to grow and thrive.Goose Creek was officially founded in 1961, but its early history dates back to the beginning of the Carolina colony. The city was a waterway at the time, and the name “Goose Creek” likely originated due to the curved shape of its creeks and waters, similar to that of a goose&rsqu...

The city of Goose Creek is the most populated city in Berkley County. And with a tight-knit community, beautiful outdoor attractions and a great location with close proximity to Charleston, the city’s population continues to grow and thrive.

Goose Creek was officially founded in 1961, but its early history dates back to the beginning of the Carolina colony. The city was a waterway at the time, and the name “Goose Creek” likely originated due to the curved shape of its creeks and waters, similar to that of a goose’s neck.

The first inhabitants of the Goose Creek territory were the Eitwan and Sewee Indian tribes, and European settlers then arrived in the early 1670s. The rich soil of the area along the Cooper River attracted wealthy planters from the British Caribbean colony of Barbados, including Sir John Yeamans and Sir Peter Colleton.

The region of Goose Creek became known as home to the “Goose Creek Men.” These men established a trade route with the Native Americans, trading goods from cloth to guns and ammunition.

The Goose Creek Men were known for questioning higher authority of the Lord Proprietors in the colony, and they eventually undermined the hierarchy, gaining a majority in the Commons House of Assembly.

The majority of white inhabitants of Goose Creek practiced Anglicanism, but many Huguenots were established there after 1700, including the Izard family on the Elms plantation. The Anglican Parish of St. James Goose Creek was established in 1706 and completed in 1719 by a small group of planters.

St. James Church still stands today and is one of the oldest surviving buildings in South Carolina and one of the only surviving Georgian chapels in the nation.

By the eighteenth century, Goose Creek was a prosperous and popular area for rice production. The town continued to experience population growth, measuring a population of 2,787 in the first U.S. census in 1790. 2,333 members of that population were slaves who harvested the rice plantations.

Goose Creek remained prosperous for rice production into the nineteenth century, with the eventual demise of rice plantations after the Civil War led to the abolishment of slavery. Hurricanes eventually wiped out the remains of rice fields across South Carolina. The area became desolate and as a result, the population decreased heavily.

In the twentieth century, wealthy northerners bought land in Goose Creek to inhabit during winters. They moved to the area to hunt. The United States Ammunition Depot was established near Goose Creek, later becoming the Naval Weapons Annex in 1959.

These new establishments brought growth to Goose Creek, resulting in the need for the town to become incorporated. The town of Goose Creek was incorporated in 1961. The population underwent a surge in numbers, from 3,656 in 1970 to 17,811 by 1980, making it the largest city in Berkeley County.

The town continues to grow steadily. In 2021, its population clocked in at 46,229. The city is an attractive destination for future homeowners, boasting award-winning schools, recreational activities and a close proximity to the city of Charleston and coastal beaches. Goose Creek also hosts many events and takes pride in offering their residents the ability to live, work and raise families in the town’s borders.

Goose Creek residents share concerns about stormwater flooding their property

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Homeowners in a Goose Creek neighborhood are looking for a solution to the flooding that affects their properties every time it rains.Kristen Gilliam has lived in the Boulder Bluff Neighborhood in Goose Creek for about 15 years. She has a home around the corner from her parents and they both see their properties fill up with sitting water each time it rains. It’s not just the yards threateningly close to their homes; she says it’s also the streets.“It doesn’t even have to be he...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Homeowners in a Goose Creek neighborhood are looking for a solution to the flooding that affects their properties every time it rains.

Kristen Gilliam has lived in the Boulder Bluff Neighborhood in Goose Creek for about 15 years. She has a home around the corner from her parents and they both see their properties fill up with sitting water each time it rains. It’s not just the yards threateningly close to their homes; she says it’s also the streets.

“It doesn’t even have to be heavy rain. It does get very bad in some areas, especially down one of the roads here. Water Oak Drive and Lucy Drive itself. They do tend to flood to where people have to literally turn around and take another route. The neighborhood tends to shut down,” Gilliam says.

She says the flooding is affecting some of the homes, and she knows people who are moving out and say the water is a big reason why.

“Like on this road alone, we actually have a bunch of vacant homes right now because they’ve left. A lot of people have had damages happen in the past year. Like my next next-door neighbor, they’re gone. A couple of other owners have just left their homes,” Gilliam says.

A road over in Boulder Bluff, Leslie Powell and her family have lived in their house for three years.

“The first time that we noticed the flooding was like, maybe a month after we moved in. We were in the house hanging out and then looked out the window and our whole yard was underwater. And we talked to our neighbors and they said the flooding hadn’t been that bad since Hugo and since then three years ago, it happens throughout the summer. It happens every couple of weeks or so,” Powell says.

She says their property is a little downhill and dips down from the road so their house is built up from the ground. But, they still have issues with water getting into their crawl space and water getting into their cars.

“We have to move the cars there’s been damage under our house and water has gotten into our cars before when we’ve been out of town. And so it’s been going on for at least three years now,” Powell says.

The women say the neighbors talk amongst themselves and some have individually tried calling the city and county to get answers. But so far, they haven’t been able to get in contact with the right person, and say they feel bounced around with no answers.

“There’s clearly a bigger issue that needs to be addressed and I don’t know what that is. So I don’t know the right questions to ask,” Powell says.

Gilliam acknowledges that making sure drains are clear from trash or tree trimmings is the responsibility of the neighbors.

“I know the neighborhood has a lot of debris and trash and it is our responsibility to also clean up the neighborhood. But I believe is the county or the city, whatever you live in I feel like it’s their responsibility to make sure that our trenches or ditches are actually trenched out and they’re not being built up with a bunch of debris,” Gilliam says.

The city of Goose Creek directed concerns for this area to the Berkeley County Stormwater Department. Berkeley County Stormwater Department says they are looking into the service history and plans for the neighborhood and will provide them when available.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Nearly 1,000 housing units planned in new Charleston-area development

A new residential development slated for the northern edge of Goose Creek could bring nearly 1,000 new housing units....

A new residential development slated for the northern edge of Goose Creek could bring nearly 1,000 new housing units.

South Carolina’s eighth-largest city is poised to annex a 515-acre parcel on U.S. Highway 52 north of Medway Road, where new single-family homes would be built.

Goose Creek also plans to change the land use on 37 acres between Medway and Montague Plantation roads to allow a mixed-use development.

The larger property, called the Medway Tract, would include 425 single-family houses and 200 age-restricted homes.

The smaller Monarch Tract could have 240 apartments, 71 townhomes and 53,000 square feet of commercial space.

The projects are part of the Laurel Bay planned development making its way through the city approval process.

The 515-acre parcel is owned by Rye-Build LLC of Florida, which paid $4 million for the Medway Tract in 2021, according to Berkeley County land records.

The smaller site would include a commercial development with 46,000 square feet of retail space, including a 30,000-square-foot grocery store and 7,000 square feet set aside for office space. It would sit off Montague Plantation Road at Orangetip Drive.

The small commercial node, which includes the proposed multifamily structures, is currently zoned for general commercial use. The developer, Eastwood Construction Partners, is asking to change that to a planned development as part of the Laurel Bay project.

Homes would not be built on the entire 515-acre Medway parcel. Plans show residences on about 258 acres since part of the tract is wetlands, some of which the city is asking to be placed under a conservation easement.

Eastwood Homes is expected to develop most of the single-family homes, according to Goose Creek Mayor Greg Habib. Sunburst Properties of Tallahassee will likely build planned patio homes.

“It’s going to be a really nice neighborhood with a lot of open space,” Habib said.

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Eastwood division president Dion Matheney expects construction on homes to begin in about 24 months. The townhome development is already under construction on the smaller parcel.

“We are trying to get the planned unit development approved for the density and will then start working on the design when we know how many homes will be allowed,” Matheney said.

He also noted some commercial development will occur in the initial phase as the homes in Laurel Bay begin construction.

Habib said the proposed expansion of Goose Creek’s borders is in keeping with his administration’s goal to attract more economic activity to the city of about 48,000 residents.

“Growth is absolutely necessary,” he said. “Until someone invents an economy not based on growth, that’s what we have. You have to grow. It’s how we continue to provide services at a high level.”

He said the city has been working with the developer for about two years to come up with a design that minimizes the effects of additional traffic, phases in commercial development and calls for a higher design standard than what’s required under the existing rules.

The commercial area, including a future supermarket, “is absolutely something we want there,” Habib said. “We’ve had conversations with three potential grocers, but nothing to announce. It’s still early.”

The town’s economic development director also cited the importance of growing the city and adding commercial entities to its northern sector.

“On that side of town, we don’t have many grocery stores or retail,” Rob Wiggins said. “It’s important for those people who live there so they won’t have to go down the road to another grocery store and add to the traffic already on the road. ...We don’t want any part of the city to feel neglected.”

City Council is expected to take up the second of two required votes on Nov. 14. Initial approval was granted in September.

The Goose Creek Planning Commission unanimously approved the project Oct. 3.

A decades-old Lowcountry truck terminal was idled this summer by a high-profile business failure, its owner running on fumes.

It’s poised to rev back to life.

The former Yellow Corp. depot between Rivers Avenue and Interstate 26 in North Charleston and two others in South Carolina are among the properties that onetime rivals of the fallen company and other opportunistic buyers snapped up at a U.S. Bankruptcy Court auction in Delaware.

The sales, totaling about $1.9 billion for about 75 percent of the roughly 180 freight yards and service centers that went on the block, were approved last week.

The other Palmetto State sites changing hands are in West Columbia and Piedmont, southwest of Greenville.

Yellow’s remaining real estate holdings are still in play, including a recently shuttered terminal in Florence.

The North Charleston depot had been in business since at least 1967, when it was run by a familiar name in the tractor-trailer business: Roadway Express.

Twenty years ago Nashville-based Yellow eased into the fast lane. It acquired Roadway for $1.05 billion in December 2003 and became the No. 3 player in the U.S. logistic industry’s “less-than-truckload” niche, which specializes in moving smaller loads for multiple customers within a single trailer.

Some two decades on, Yellow was broken down on the side of the road. The company filed for bankruptcy protection in August after years of financial struggles and $1.3 billion in debt, not including its unsecured liabilities.

The collapse marked the biggest-ever failure of a U.S. trucking business. It was more than noteworthy that just three years earlier Yellow had received $700 million in pandemic-era loans from the U.S. government to keep it afloat.

Rather than try to fix the financial wear and tear, the fallen 99-year-old trucking icon known for its cheap rates decided instead to shut down and sell its real estate, rigs and other assets to repay creditors.

Goose Creek residents grapple with alumina dust from local aluminum plant

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — It's alumnia dust, and it's becoming a nuisance in Goose Creek.People who live near the Century Aluminum Plant say the particles are covering cars and raising concerns over possible health issues."You can actually pick up piles of it, and that's probably not a good thing," Nat Miranda said.Goose Creek residents grapple with alumina dust from local aluminum plant (WCIV)Read more: ...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — It's alumnia dust, and it's becoming a nuisance in Goose Creek.

People who live near the Century Aluminum Plant say the particles are covering cars and raising concerns over possible health issues.

"You can actually pick up piles of it, and that's probably not a good thing," Nat Miranda said.

Goose Creek residents grapple with alumina dust from local aluminum plant (WCIV)

Read more: White dust emitted into Goose Creek from Century Aluminum plant; officials respond.

Miranda said this dust covering his car had been a problem for weeks.

"I mean, they've been a great neighbor for years now," Miranda said. "They need to take some steps to address it and make sure that we feel comfortable with them around still."

Goose Creek Mayor Greg Habib said he's been in contact with the plant. He explained the problem is with the Century's baghouse. And DHEC tells him the dust isn't a health issue.

"DHEC does not see this as a public health issue," Habib said. "There's a big difference between exposure and chronic exposure. Chronic exposure is constant exposure over a long period of time, and no one is experiencing that at this point."

Mayor Habib said he's been in contact with state leaders discussing the issue.

"The governor's office reported back to me what they learned," he said. "DHEC is in the area today and tomorrow with air quality testing measures to measure and see what exactly what the air quality issues are."

Read more: Attorney General Alan Wilson announces 26th Annual Silent Witness Ceremony.

As for a timeline to get the issue fixed, it won't take more than a few weeks.

"Now as they have gained more information over the last couple of days, they feel like they have a solution that hopefully won't take more than a week or two," he said. "I know that they are working diligently to get it fixed as fast as they can."

In the meantime, both parties said they want to see transparency.

"They told the regulators when it happened," Miranda said. "What about telling the community? I mean, obviously, it's something that we can see, so how about you say, Hey, we had a problem."

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Habib added: "People wanna see transparency. and we continue to work to get that. I think that we have to figure out as a, as a governmental agency, d e C and us and Century Aluminum as a corporate entity, um, to communicate maybe a little bit faster than we have, um, about what the issues are."

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