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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Great Falls, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Great Falls:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Great Falls, SC

Five Things to Know: Cougar Classic

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Wisconsin women's golf tees off the 2022-23 season at the Cougar Classic this Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 12-13, at Yeamans Hall in Charleston, South Carolina.Here are the five things to know as the Badgers hit the links:1. New Year, New Faces: Wisconsin welcomes two new freshman — Alexia Siehl and ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Wisconsin women's golf tees off the 2022-23 season at the Cougar Classic this Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 12-13, at Yeamans Hall in Charleston, South Carolina.

Here are the five things to know as the Badgers hit the links:

1. New Year, New Faces: Wisconsin welcomes two new freshman — Alexia Siehl and Yongze Cheng — to the roster and returns seven golfers led by seniors Emily Lauterbach and Nicole Ciskowski.

"We're excited to get started this weekend," said Wisconsin head coach Todd Oehrlein. "The Cougar Classic is a tournament that we've played in in the past and it's a very strong field to start our season.

"The players have had good summers and the early fall has been very competitive. We've been excited to see more low scores from multiple players so far. Throughout the fall, we'll be playing in highly competitive tournament fields on great golf courses. It's an opportunity to get off to a strong start and we'll need that depth as we work through the fall."

2. The Course: Yeamans Hall Club is a 6,301-yard, par-72 course designed by Seth Raynor and Charles Banks in 1926. This private club is ranked No. 99 on Golf Digest's Top 100 Courses in 2021 and has been in the top 100 since 2015.

3. The Tournament: The Cougar Classic is hosted by the College of Charleston. Monday will be 36 holes of consecutive play, shotgun style starting at 7:30 a.m. CST. Tuesday will be an 18-hole shotgun starting at 7:45 a.m. CST. Wisconsin finished the 2021 Cougar Classic tied for 10th place (295-291-291 = 877 (+13). This tied the 12th-lowest 54-hole score in Wisconsin program history and the Badgers also finished ahead of the three other Big Ten competitors in the tournament — No. 22 Maryland, Michigan State and Penn State. Then-freshman Vanesso Ho paced the Badgers, placing 35th overall (74-74-70=218).

4. The Field: Competing in the tournament are Charleston, Central Florida, Clemson, East Carolina, Florida State, Furman, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisville, Miami (Fla.), Michigan State, Mississippi, North Carolina, N.C. State, Penn State, Tennessee and Wisconsin. Competing for the Badgers are Lauterbach, Chloe Chan, Vanessa Ho, Siehl and Gia Feliciano.

5. The Gallery: Fans can follow live stats on Golfstat.com and can follow live updates on Wisconsin at the @BadgerWGolf Twitter page.

Hogs moving on without captain Catalon

( Charlie Kaijo)Arkansas defensive back Simeon Blair (15) tackles South Carolina quarterback Spencer Rattler (7), Saturday, September 10, 2022 during the second quarter of a football game at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville.FAYETTEVILLE — For a second consecutive season, Arkansas must play without its top defensive back in All-SEC safety Jalen Catalon.But as the Razorbacks showed l...

( Charlie Kaijo)

Arkansas defensive back Simeon Blair (15) tackles South Carolina quarterback Spencer Rattler (7), Saturday, September 10, 2022 during the second quarter of a football game at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville.

FAYETTEVILLE — For a second consecutive season, Arkansas must play without its top defensive back in All-SEC safety Jalen Catalon.

But as the Razorbacks showed last season in finishing 9-4 and this season in starting 2-0, the secondary has other players it can rely on.

Catalon suffered what proved to be a season-ending shoulder injury early in the third quarter in this season’s opener against Cincinnati that will require surgery.

The Razorbacks held on to beat Cincinnati 31-24 last week, then opened SEC play with a 44-30 victory over South Carolina.

Catalon, a redshirt junior, also had a shoulder injury last season that required surgery and he missed the final seven games.

Arkansas is 6-2 in games Catalon has missed, including victories over Mississippi State, LSU, Missouri and Penn State last season when the Razorbacks finished No. 21 in The Associated Press poll.

After opening this season ranked No. 19, the Razorbacks are up to No. 10 in the latest AP poll released Sunday. They moved up from No. 16, where Arkansas was ranked after beating Cincinnati.

More from WholeHogSports: Razorbacks crack top 10 in AP poll after 2-0 start

Catalon, an All-SEC first team pick in 2020 when he had 99 tackles, 3 interceptions and 2 forced fumbles in 10 games, was a preseason AP second-team All-American each of the last two years.

“We always would love to have Catalon because of how talented he is,” senior safety Simeon Blair said. “But we have a lot of players.”

The Razorbacks also played without starting nickel back Myles Slusher against South Carolina because of an undisclosed injury he sustained in the Cincinnati game, but Coach Sam Pittman said he’s expected back for Saturday night’s game against Missouri State.

Without Catalon and Slusher, Blair was joined in the starting lineup against South Carolina by cornerbacks Hudson Clark and Dwight McGlothern, nickel back Jayden Johnson and safeties Latavious Brini and Khari Johnson. Safety Malik Chavis and cornerback LaDarrius Bishop also played.

McGlothern, a junior transfer from LSU, had an interception for the second consecutive game. Brini, a senior transfer from Georgia, forced a fumble that Clark recovered.

Jayden Johnson broke up a deep pass intended for Ahmarean Brown to prevent a touchdown, sacked Spencer Rattler for a 6-yard loss while forcing a fumble recovered by linebacker Chris Paul and had a quarterback hurry.

Blair had five tackles and Brini had four with a quarterback hurry. McGlothern had four tackles.

South Carolina hit some big plays as Rattler, a transfer from Oklahoma, completed 24 of 39 passes for 376 yards.

“Well, I think sometimes really good and sometimes not really good,” Arkansas Coach Sam Pittman said when asked how he thought the defensive backs played. “To me, we covered well at times and we covered poorly at times.

“We just have to become more consistent. I think we can do that. But with the first week of losing two of your top defenders and coming out with a win like that and fighting and scrapping, I thought it was good.

“They played Arkansas football. Do we have to get better? Yeah. Do we need to get Slusher back? Yes.

“There’s a lot of things going on, but I thought they played well for their first time [without Catalon and Slusher].”

South Carolina Coach Shane Beamer knew Catalon and Slusher were expected to miss the game.

“We felt really good about our ability to throw the football,” Beamer said. “Not that we didn’t with the run game. But they had two starters out with Catalon and Slusher. Those were big losses for them.

“Cincinnati had some opportunities in the passing game that they weren’t able to capitalize on as well. We felt like we could take our shots downfield, which is what we did.

“We liked our matchups in the passing game for sure.”

Brini didn’t arrive at Arkansas until the summer.

“Brini’s a really good player,” Blair said. “He came into our system, and we do a lot of stuff. I feel like we require a lot of communication and with that communication, that means you’ve got to learn the playbook real fast.

“We have a lot of different stuff we do, a lot of different personnel. For him to come out there and play as well as he did, in just a short amount of time from being here in the summer … it says a lot.

More from WholeHogSports: Drew Sanders earns national award for play vs. South Carolina

“It says he came here and really took this serious and he’s a real playmaker. He’s going to be very helpful for us this year. He’s going to make a big difference.”

Brini started 11 games last season when Georgia won the national championship.

“So it’s kind of hard for me to go, ‘Woe are we,’ whenever we got a guy who started a lot of games for the national champions,” Pittman said. “He has to come in and play our system and play it well.

“It was good from the transfer portal to have him back there.”

Brini said he appreciated how Arkansas’ players and coaches welcomed him to the program.

“Because when I came here from Georgia, it was a little rocky and they took me in with wide open arms,” Brini said. “They showed me nothing but love.”

Pittman said he didn’t want to use the loss of Catalon for the season and Slusher at least for the South Carolina as an excuse.

“I said to the team in the pregame speech it’s not about the players that ain’t out there, it’s about the ones that are,” Pittman said. “I’m sympathetic for both injuries — very, very.

“But you go out there on a Saturday, you’re going to play. South Carolina came. You’re going to play the game.

“Slush and Cat get it too, and [injured defensive lineman] Taurean Carter. Whoever you don’t have out there.

“At that time it’s about the ones that are out there and they fought their tails off I thought.”

During spring practice, summer workouts and preseason camp, Arkansas’ defensive backs did plenty of cross-training between the safety and cornerback spots.

“I feel like it was a hard game, but it also was great to see all our training paying off, after doing all the stuff in the summer and fall camp,” Blair said. “Switching positions and moving everybody around. I feel like it definitely helped us.”

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Breaking Down the 2022-23 Women's Golf Schedule

TEMPE, Ariz. - The Sun Devil Women's Golf season is right around the corner, with Head Coach Missy Farr-Kaye announcing a challenging 2022-23 slate.The schedule features ten regular season tournaments, with four taking place in the Fall and the other six scheduled for the Spring of 2023. This leads into a three-part postseason which includes the Pac-12 Championship, NCAA Regionals, and the NCAA Championship....

TEMPE, Ariz. - The Sun Devil Women's Golf season is right around the corner, with Head Coach Missy Farr-Kaye announcing a challenging 2022-23 slate.

The schedule features ten regular season tournaments, with four taking place in the Fall and the other six scheduled for the Spring of 2023. This leads into a three-part postseason which includes the Pac-12 Championship, NCAA Regionals, and the NCAA Championship.

Missy Farr-Kaye's team is coming off another strong campaign in which they finished ninth at the NCAA Championship, narrowly missing out on a second-straight berth in Match Play. Arizona State returns five from a talented 2021-22 roster and has high expectations yet again. The team will be tested with a difficult 2022-23 campaign, with the Sun Devils competing in some of the nation's premiere events.

COACH'S CORNER "We are excited for our schedule this coming year. The strength of this schedule is among the highest of any team in the nation. Our team will be ready to travel to some great golf courses and venues while finishing our year at Grayhawk for the final year of ASU hosting the NCAA Championship!"

The following is a breakdown of the 2022-23 Sun Devil Women's Golf schedule, which features five events in the state of Arizona. Never have Sun Devil fans had more opportunities to check out their Sun Devils than this season. It all culminates in the 2023 NCAA Women's Golf Championship, once again hosted by Arizona State and The Thunderbirds at Grayhawk Golf Club. Here is more information on each tournament:

FALL SEASON ANNIKA Intercollegiate – September 12-14 (Lake Elmo, MN) For the third consecutive season, Arizona State will compete in the ANNIKA Intercollegiate hosted by the ANNIKA Foundation. The Sun Devils waste no time testing themselves against some of the nation's best teams. 12 teams will compete at Royal Golf Club for one of the Fall's most prestigious titles. ASU is joined by Oregon, South Carolina, Wake Forest, Alabama, Virginia, Auburn, Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Duke. 11 of the 12 programs are in the Preseason Top-25, making this a great early measuring stick opportunity for the Sun Devils.

Windy City Collegiate – October 3-4 (Highland Park, IL) Arizona State will be back in a familiar spot when they return to the Windy City Collegiate, competing in the tournament in three of the past five years. Northwestern hosts this loaded field at another strong Fall event, featuring Top-25 teams in Oregon, USC, South Carolina, Duke, Florida, Texas, Michigan, Virginia and Arizona. Michigan State, Purdue, Washington, and Iowa State fill out the 14-team tournament, taking place at Exmoor Country Club.

Stanford Intercollegiate – October 21-23 (Stanford, CA) Arguably the biggest challenge of the Fall will come from Arizona State's annual appearance in the Stanford Intercollegiate, hosted by Stanford at Stanford Golf Course. The Sun Devils have been a regular participant at this event since its inception, winning the team championship six times. The last time came in 2019 when Linn Grant and Raquel Olmos recorded Top-5 finishes. ASU is joined by ranked teams Florida, USC, Stanford, San Jose State, Georgia, Northwestern, Texas, and Virginia.

Pac-12 Preview – October 31-November 2 (Kailua-Kona, HI) The fall season wraps up in paradise, as Sun Devil Women's Golf makes their yearly trip to Hawaii for the Pac-12 Preview. A majority of the conference will make the trip to Nanea Golf Club for another prestigious tournament. Host school Hawaii will be the only non Pac-12 team in the field, giving fans a glimpse of what the Pac-12 Championship will look like. Arizona State will take a two-month break before competing in the Spring season that will span from January-May.

SPRING SEASON Match in the Desert – January 23 (Gold Canyon, AZ) The Sun Devils will make their first appearance in the state of Arizona when they travel to Superstition Mountain Golf & Country Club for the Match in the Desert. Arizona State will enter the event as the four-time defending event champion, winning the 2022 event over No. 2 Oklahoma State by five strokes. Kansas will host for the second consecutive year, with the tournament moving to one day in 2023.

Nexus Collegiate – February 13-15 (New Providence, Bahamas) Arizona State will leave the country for the first time in nearly a decade when they travel to the Bahamas for the Nexus Collegiate. The Sun Devils will be a part of a unique event taking place at Albany Golf Club and hosted by Auburn. This is the first time ASU will compete in this event, which will be the first Women's Golf tournament hosted in the Bahamas. ASU will get the chance to face off with teams from the SEC & ACC in one of the marquee events of the Spring.

Darius Rucker Intercollegiate – February 27-March 1 (Hilton Head, SC) Following a successful debut on GOLF Channel in 2022, the Darius Rucker Intercollegiate returns as one of the most important events in the college golf world. It will once again be aired live on GOLF Channel from Long Cove Club, with the nation's top teams getting exposure on a national scale. Arizona State enjoyed a fantastic performance at last year's Darius Rucker, with Coach Farr-Kaye getting her players ready to play under the pressure. This event ended up being a preview of the NCAA Championship last year, with the nation's top ranked teams getting significant media coverage and attention.

Cactus Cup – March 13-14 (Phoenix, AZ) Arizona State will make their second appearance in Arizona when they host the first-ever Cactus Cup in March. The two-day event is scheduled for match play format and will feature South Carolina, Virginia, and UCLA. Four NCAA Championship competitors will get a taste of Match Play, which is used to determine the NCAA Championship. ASU benefited from a similar experience at the Niklaus Cup in 2021-22, with Coach Farr-Kaye bringing a unique event to the backyard of Sun Devil fans.

PING/ASU Invitational – March 24-26 (Phoenix, AZ) The Sun Devils continue a stretch in which they don't leave the state as they host the annual PING/ASU Invitational at Papago Golf Club. Several of the nation's top teams will once again take part in one of the most historic collegiate golf tournaments, the third chance for fans to check out ASU in the state. Arizona State is the defending champions, winning their 21st team championship in a run-a-way, claiming the victory by an enormous 15 strokes. Not only was the 839 (-25) tied for the lowest score in program history, the 15-stroke advantage was the most ASU has won by in PING/ASU Invitational history.

Alexandra Forsterling was sensational in taking home individual medalist honors, becoming the 17th Sun Devil to win the individual crown. Forsterling (-9/207) had to beat out teammate Ashley Menne for the title, as Arizona State finished 1-2 in the final player standings. She is the first Sun Devil to win at PING/ASU since Roberta Liti back in 2017.

Silverado Showdown – April 3-5 (Napa, CA) The final regular season tournament is another familiar one for ASU, as they return to the Silverado Showdown at Silverado Resort & Spa. Colorado and Oregon host the event that the Sun Devils have had past success at. In 2022, Alessandra Fanali won the final regular season tournament of her career, becoming the first Sun Devil to win the Silverado Showdown. This represents the final tune-up before the postseason run begins.

POSTSEASON Pac-12 Championship – April 17-19 (Phoenix, AZ) For the first time since 2011, Arizona State will host the Pac-12 Women's Golf Championship in their fourth appearance in the state of Arizona. This will be the first time that the Sun Devils host at Papago Golf Club, a place that Coach Missy Farr-Kaye's team has enjoyed plenty of success at. The Maroon & Gold will get a chance to win their first Pac-12 Championship since 2009 in front of their home fans. The nation's top conference annually offers one of the most competitive conference championship events.

NCAA Regionals – May 8-10 (Athens/Palm Beach Gardens/Pullman/Raleigh/San Antonio/Westfield) Arizona State has qualified for NCAA Regionals every year since it was instituted in 1992. If they do so again in 2022, they will travel to one of the following six sites. A total of 72 teams are selected to the NCAA Regionals, with 12 teams making each regional. ASU would need to finish in the Top-4 of their regional to advance to the NCAA Championship. Here are the six regional locations:

NCAA Championship – May 19-24 (Scottsdale, AZ; Grayhawk Golf Club) The 2023 NCAA Women's Golf Championship will be hosted by the Thunderbirds and Arizona State at Grayhawk Golf Club. This is the third consecutive year that the Sun Devils will serve as host of the most prestigious event of the season. Coach Farr-Kaye's team has qualified for the NCAA Chamionship each of the past six seasons, advancing to NCAA Match Play on two ocassions (2017 & 2020). The 2017 run ended in the program's eighth NCAA Championship, a number they look to add to in their own backyard at the end of the season.

2022-23 Arizona State Women's Golf Schedule ANNIKA Intercollegiate – September 12-14 (Lake Elmo, MN) Windy City Collegiate – October 3-4 (Wilmette, IL) Stanford Intercollegiate – October 21-23 (Stanford, CA) Pac-12 Preview – October 31-November 2 (Kailua-Kona, HI) Match in the Desert – January 23 (Gold Canyon, AZ) Nexus Collegiate – February 13-15 (Nassau, Bahamas) Darius Rucker Intercollegiate – February 27-March 1 (Hilton Head, SC) Cactus Cup – March 13-14 (Scottsdale, AZ) PING/ASU Invitational – March 24-26 (Phoenix, AZ) Silverado Showdown – April 3-4 (Napa, CA) Pac-12 Championship – April 17-19 (Phoenix, AZ) NCAA Regionals – May 8-10 (Athens/Palm Beach Gardens/Pullman/Raleigh/San Antonio/Westfield) NCAA Championship – May 19-24 (Scottsdale, AZ; Grayhawk Golf Club)

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Pelion’s Luke New named The State’s Midlands high school football player of the week

Congratulations to Pelion quarterback Luke New for winning the vote for this week’s State’s Midlands Player of the Week honors.A new poll will be released on Monday.The nominees are listed below. Please note that these polls are not scientific and are meant to be just for fun.Carew Bates, QB, AC Flora: Senior was 10-of-15 passing for 162 yards, three touchdowns, and ran for a score in the win over Greenwood.JB Belk, LB, Heathwood Hall: Junior had 12 tackles, two for loss, in...

Congratulations to Pelion quarterback Luke New for winning the vote for this week’s State’s Midlands Player of the Week honors.

A new poll will be released on Monday.

The nominees are listed below. Please note that these polls are not scientific and are meant to be just for fun.

Carew Bates, QB, AC Flora: Senior was 10-of-15 passing for 162 yards, three touchdowns, and ran for a score in the win over Greenwood.

JB Belk, LB, Heathwood Hall: Junior had 12 tackles, two for loss, in the shutout win over Great Falls.

Taevian Copney, RB, Ben Lippen: Junior rushed for 85 yards, two touchdowns, also caught two passes for 64 yards and a TD in a win over Asheville Christian.

Colby Fuller, QB, Dreher: Junior was 14-of-23 passing for 242 yards, TD, and also ran for a score in the win over Keenan.

Cooper Johns, RB, River Bluff: Senior rushed for 113 yards and three touchdowns in the win over Lugoff-Elgin.

Kamadi Maxwell, WR, Lexington: Senior caught 8 passes for 203 yards, two touchdowns, and also had a tackle in a loss to West Florence.

J’Von Mack, DB, Dutch Fork: Senior had five tackles and intercepted two passes in a win over Hough (N.C.).

Cam McMillon, QB, Fairfield Central: Freshman was 19-of-25 passing for 315 yards, five touchdowns in the win over Carvers Bay.

Luke New, QB, Pelion: Junior ran for 211 yards, five touchdowns, and also was 6-of-9 passing for 111 yards and a TD in the win over Bethune Bowman.

Jesse Ross, RB, White Knoll: Senior rushed for 125 yards, two touchdowns, and also caught a TD pass in a win over Orangeburg-Wilkinson.

Grayson White, QB, Camden: Junior was 12-of-21 for 200 yards, 3 TDs also rushed for 144 yards, 2 TDs in win over Myrtle Beach.

Jonas Wilson, DL, Spring Valley: Junior had 13 tackles, four for loss, two sacks and five QB hurries in win over Westwood.

Will Wilson, QB, Richland Northeast: Sophomore was 13-of-16 passing for 140 yards, a TD, ran for 122 yards and two scores in win over Crestwood.

This story was originally published August 22, 2022 9:50 AM.

At 50, TV's ‘The Waltons’ still stirs fans’ love, nostalgia

The Rev. Matt Curry’s parents were children of the Great Depression, just like “The Waltons” — the beloved TV family whose prime-time series premiered 50 years ago.When Curry was growing up on a farm in northern Texas, his carpenter father and teacher mother often argued playfully over who had a poorer childhood.“The Depression was the seminal time of their lives — the time that was about family and survival and making it through,” said Curry, now a 59-year-old Presbyterian pastor in Ow...

The Rev. Matt Curry’s parents were children of the Great Depression, just like “The Waltons” — the beloved TV family whose prime-time series premiered 50 years ago.

When Curry was growing up on a farm in northern Texas, his carpenter father and teacher mother often argued playfully over who had a poorer childhood.

“The Depression was the seminal time of their lives — the time that was about family and survival and making it through,” said Curry, now a 59-year-old Presbyterian pastor in Owensboro, Kentucky. “My dad used to talk about how his dad would go work out of town and send $5 a week to feed and clothe the family.”

So when “The Waltons,” set in 1932 and running through World War II, debuted on CBS on Sept. 14, 1972, the Currys identified closely with the storylines. Millions of others felt the same, and the Thursday night drama about a Depression-era family in rural Virginia became one of TV’s most popular and enduring programs.

At a time when the networks generally avoided “dangerous” content, “The Waltons” was notable for taking on difficult topics — religion, in particular — said Robert Thompson, director of Syracuse University’s Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture.

“I think it was an important show, and I think it actually doesn’t get the attention that it deserves,” Thompson said.

“‘The Waltons’ really did get down and roll around in some very, very serious spiritual themes,” he added. “For example, an atheist comes to town, and we get this whole discussion between atheism and spirituality.”

“The Waltons” ran for nine seasons and 221 episodes, ranking as high as No. 2 in the Nielsen ratings. A half-century later it still stirs nostalgia among loyal fans who can’t resist taking in cable TV reruns, binging episodes via streaming apps and keeping up with former stars through social media.

Based on the life of its creator, the late Earl Hamner Jr., the show followed a large extended family living in a white, two-story farmhouse and running a sawmill in the fictional Blue Ridge foothills town of Walton’s Mountain. The parents, grandparents and seven children — John Jr., Jason, Mary Ellen, Erin, Ben, Jim-Bob and Elizabeth — were depicted wearing overalls and dresses, praying at meals and overcoming adversity through hard work and grace.

“The Waltons” focused on John Jr., known as John-Boy, played by Richard Thomas and modeled on Hamner. The oldest sibling, he aspired to be a writer and experience the world beyond his humble upbringing.

Now 71 and starring as lawyer Atticus Finch in a touring production of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Thomas said he still hears fans call “Good night, John-Boy!” after each performance. The familiar catchphrase pays homage to the Emmy-winning role that made him famous.

“It’s kind of astonishing that we’re still talking about a show 50 years later,” said Thomas, who narrates “A Waltons Thanksgiving,” a made-for-TV movie airing this fall on the CW network.

“To have that kind of longevity and then have it mean enough for people to want to do a new version of it — I’m not sure exactly why,” he added. “I know it affected a lot of people’s lives. But I think primarily Earl Hamner’s writing was just so great and the cast loved each other so much and we were so committed.”

John-Boy had a lot to do with the show’s popularity — and inspired many a crush back then among fans like Jerri Harrington, now 67, of Centreville, Virginia.

Harrington still watches an episode every night with her husband of 47 years. During the frightening early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, she said, its characters — particularly grandma Esther, played by the late Ellen Corby — brought a sense of comfort and return to childhood.

“It just feels familiar,” said Harrington, a grandmother herself.

Another lifelong fan, Carol Jackson, like Curry the daughter of Depression-era parents, sees her own family’s story reflected.

She became a fan as a kindergartner and as an adult placed “Waltons” DVDs in the resort cabins that her family operated in the Ozarks of northern Arkansas. The homespun stories still connect with the 55-year-old mother of three.

“I just told my kids, ‘One day when I’m old and in my wheelchair … just wheel me in front of ‘The Waltons’ on a continual loop, and I’ll be happy,’” Jackson said.

Kami Cotler, who was 6 years old when she first starred as youngest sibling Elizabeth in a 1971 holiday TV movie that launched the series, still interacts regularly with such fans via her Facebook page, which has nearly 150,000 followers.

Cotler said “The Waltons” shared “universal truths” that help explain its lasting popularity.

“The show frequently told really simple human stories that resonate with people because that’s what life is like,” said Cotler, now an educator in Southern California. “People will joke that it was very saccharine sweet, but I don’t think that it actually was.”

On the show, parents John Walton Sr. and Olivia Walton — played, respectively, by the late Ralph Waite, an ordained minister in real life, and Michael Learned — frequently clashed over their differing approaches to God. Olivia was a devout Baptist, but John Sr. was not a churchgoer.

“I’ve always looked for God in my own way,” he said in one episode.

An ongoing theme was the appearance in Walton’s Mountain of an outsider — a Jewish family fleeing Nazi persecution, a Black boxer and preacher raising money for a new church, a Hollywood actress who smoked and drank — who met a mixed reception.

In 1972’s “The Sinner” episode, a young pastor played by the late John Ritter arrived preaching fire-and-brimstone Bible verses. But he inadvertently became intoxicated after drinking too much of the “secret recipe” served by the Baldwin sisters, two prim and proper recurring characters who didn’t seem to realize they were bootleggers.

After the mishap touched off something of a scandal, John Sr. made a rare appearance at church and pointed to Jesus’ words from John 8:7: “Let him who is without sin cast the first stone.”

“The religious aspect of the show had to do with the fact that Earl Hamner was talking about a time and a place ... where those issues were very much in play,” said Thomas, now a grandfather of four. “I mean, in a small community in the mountains of Virginia in the Depression, if you don’t deal with the church aspect of things, then you don’t deal with things as they were.”

Over the show’s long run, the Waltons and their neighbors learned valuable lessons about overcoming differences and treating everyone with love and respect. Those lessons, Cotler said, “are perhaps even more relevant today.”

On a personal note, Cotler, a secular Jew, credits grandpa Zeb, played by the late Will Geer, with teaching her how to sing church songs on the show.

Curry, the Kentucky pastor, said “The Waltons” reflected how Jesus often rebukes religious people for hypocrisy in the Bible, while commending an unexpected person — such as a Samaritan who helped a stranger — for showing love and grace.

The show “talked about religion and faith … in a way that does not demean people,” Curry said. “There’s something in there that we are missing today, and it’s the sense of community, of unity, of battling through hard times.”

Associated Press religion coverage receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

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