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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Great Falls, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Great Falls:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Great Falls, SC

Kaitlyn Kupiec qualified for Nationals as a first-year on club equestrian team

By Cait Kemp @caitlinkemp09To get to the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) Nationals, competitors must place in the top two in Regionals and move on and place top two in Zones. If that is accomplished, competitors will get the opportunity to compete at Nationals, where they will face off against the best from across the country.This process is an extremely difficult one, proving that only the best of the best make it to that point. Kaitlyn Kupiec of the Springfield College club equestrian team succeeded in that proc...

By Cait Kemp @caitlinkemp09

To get to the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) Nationals, competitors must place in the top two in Regionals and move on and place top two in Zones. If that is accomplished, competitors will get the opportunity to compete at Nationals, where they will face off against the best from across the country.

This process is an extremely difficult one, proving that only the best of the best make it to that point. Kaitlyn Kupiec of the Springfield College club equestrian team succeeded in that process, and did so as just a first-year student.

The equestrian team at Springfield College is one of the lesser-known and smaller club teams on campus. Currently only two students show in competitions. Two others joined as beginners and are hoping to show in the spring. Kupiec is a leader on the team, showing in Open, which is the highest class at competitions, and showing off her skills through her success throughout the season.

Kupiec joined the team last season as a freshman and was a force on the team from the start. In horse shows, competitors can place individually or as a team. With only two team members, it is almost impossible for Springfield to place as a team so it is up to the members’ individual scores to determine if they move on to the postseason competitions in the spring.

An accumulative score of 28 is needed to go to Regionals, and after the fall season, Kupiec is already only seven points away in the jumping category and three away in the flat category. She still has the entirety of the spring regular season to qualify.

The most impressive part of Kupiec’s trip to Nationals is that she competed against Division I university’s equestrian teams. The IHSA is not a part of the NCAA, so schools could have a small, club team like the one at Springfield or large, established teams with the top athletes. She is competing against other riders of all different skill levels, and placed second in both Regionals and Zones before finishing 13th at Nationals.

Kupiec came to Springfield College not expecting to ride anymore. She began the sport at just five years old and competed through middle and high school. Not knowing there was a team at Springfield, she had been ready to give up the sport she did for 15 years.

“My godmother got me into it when I was four or five, and no one in my family was ever into this and somehow it just took off and I started doing it every day of the week after school,” Kupiec said. “I came here not expecting to do it, I didn’t even know they had a team.”

She discovered there was a team after seeing an Instagram post from the club’s account. She messaged them and went to the information meeting they were holding for anyone interested in joining the team.

“I went to the meeting, and obviously I was like, ‘Yes, I’m going to join,’ I didn’t even need to hear anything,” Kupiec said.

Kupiec still goes back to her home barn of Harmony Hill Farm, located in Great Barrington, Mass., to work with her trainer. It is the place she learned everything she knows about horseback riding, so she likes to give back and help the next generation.

“It’s cool because now that I’m older, I get to help my trainer train the horses,” she said.

She has been able to take her expertise from riding at the collegiate level and make a full-circle journey back at her barn at home. It shows her grace and willingness to help others, and how much she truly loves the sport that she had thought she would have to give up.

Kupiec’s journey in riding has been a long and impressive one, and continues to be as she concludes the fall season of her sophomore year. Going into the spring, she is looking once again to qualify for Nationals and place better than she did last year. With her high scores already this school year, it surely won’t be far out of reach.

Photo Courtesy Andrew Ryback

Great Falls Tornado Confirmed

CHESTER, S.C. (CN2 NEW) – The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF 0 tornado touched down in Great Falls in the DeWitt Road area.Chester Emergency Management Director Ed Darby says there was no damage to structures or injuries, just tree damage.The wind for a EF 0 tornado is about 75 miles per hour. Darby adding the last tornado to come through Great Falls was in 2020 and it was an EF3.Coordinates:NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 05/05/20 TORNADO EVENT......Great Falls EF-2 Tornado in Chester and Lancaster Co...

CHESTER, S.C. (CN2 NEW) – The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF 0 tornado touched down in Great Falls in the DeWitt Road area.

Chester Emergency Management Director Ed Darby says there was no damage to structures or injuries, just tree damage.

The wind for a EF 0 tornado is about 75 miles per hour. Darby adding the last tornado to come through Great Falls was in 2020 and it was an EF3.

Coordinates:

NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 05/05/20 TORNADO EVENT......Great Falls EF-2 Tornado in Chester and Lancaster Counties...Start Location...7 W Great Falls in Chester County SCEnd Location...7 ESE Great Falls in Lancaster County SCDate...05/05/2020Estimated Time...06:45 PM EDTMaximum EF-Scale Rating...EF2Estimated Maximum Wind Speed...115 mphMaximum Path Width...200.0 yardsPath Length...14.24 milesBeginning Lat/Lon...34.5925 / -81.0262Ending Lat/Lon...34.5246 / -80.7958* Fatalities...0* Injuries...0...Summary...National Weather Service Storm Survey Teams from the offices inGreenville-Spartanburg and Columbia, SC have confirmed a tornadobegan in southeastern Chester County and dissipated insouthwestern Lancaster County. The tornado produced winds up to 115 mph, which is an EF-2. The path length was just over 14 miles and path width was approximately 200 yards at its widest point. The tornado began west of Great Falls in Chester County, near OldCatholic Church Road. The tornado then moved east, crossed Interstate 77, and produced damage across Mountain Gap Road, Ross Dye Road and Georgetown Road, before turning southeast toward the town of Great Falls. The tornado crossed Highway 21 and produced damage in areas including Walnut Street, Hampton Street, Duke Street, and Republic Street. Estimated winds were up to 105 mph inChester County, based on large trees being uprooted or snapped. In addition, a house on Republic Street was destroyed when a tree fell on it.The tornado strengthened as it crossed the Catawba River andentered southwestern Lancaster County. The tornado moved southeast, producing significant tree damage, with numerous large hardwood and softwood trees uprooted or snapped. The most significant damage occurred between Green Road and Cedar Creek Road near Mount Carmel Road, where estimated winds were up to 115 mph. A tree also fell on a vehicle on Cedar Creek Road. The tornado then crossed Cunningham Quarters Road, before dissipating near Mable Anthony Road. This supercell thunderstorm also produced large hail up to Golf Ball size in Chester and Lancaster Counties, and later up to Tennis Ball size in Bethune in northern Kershaw County. EF Scale: The Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into thefollowing categories:EF0...Weak......65 to 85 mphEF1...Weak......86 to 110 mphEF2...Strong....111 to 135 mphEF3...Strong....136 to 165 mphEF4...Violent...166 to 200 mphEF5...Violent...>200 mph* The information in this statement is preliminary and subject tochange pending final review of the event and publication in NWSStorm Data.

Return of whitewater: Chester County, SC town hopes new park, rapids bring needed growth

More than 115 years have passed since two dams were built on the Catawba River in the sleepy town of Great Falls to power three textile mills.The mills in this Chester County, S.C., town closed decades ago.Residents still live in the mill villages. Historic store fronts along the town’s main roads have been shuttered for years.Residents have one grocery store, the Great Falls IGA, once a Piggly Wiggly. One of the town’s remaining restaurants, The Flopeye Diner, has a sign on the porch with the word “hop...

More than 115 years have passed since two dams were built on the Catawba River in the sleepy town of Great Falls to power three textile mills.

The mills in this Chester County, S.C., town closed decades ago.

Residents still live in the mill villages. Historic store fronts along the town’s main roads have been shuttered for years.

Residents have one grocery store, the Great Falls IGA, once a Piggly Wiggly. One of the town’s remaining restaurants, The Flopeye Diner, has a sign on the porch with the word “hope.”

Now, town and state leaders are hoping restaurants, shops, hotels and tourism-based companies will flood the town and wash away its economically-depressed status with the completion of Duke Energy’s wide-scale project on the Catawba River.

Duke officials said the Great Falls-Dearborn project, which will create new recreational channels along the river for kayaking, is about 70 percent complete.

The project was scheduled to open this summer, but additional work was needed, said Michael Brissie, manager of generation project engineering for Duke. Brissie said the facilities will open in spring of 2023.

The project has many components — public to access channels on the river, a state park with hiking trails, an historic visitor’s center, a pedestrian bridge, a 3,000-foot hiking trail on an island, parking and restrooms — all within three miles.

“This is a game-changer, obviously for Great Falls,” said S.C. Sen. Mike Fanning.

Duke started construction on the project at the Great Falls Reservoir more than a year ago. As part of a new license for the Catawba-Wateree Project in 2015, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requires Duke to provide recreation, enhancement to water quality and quantity, fish and wildlife habitat protection and land conservation along the river.

The main focus of this project is to bring water back to two channels, or bypasses, that were cut off more than a hundred years ago. Those channels made up the 50-foot Great Falls of the Catawba, the town’s namesake.

One channel will be the long bypass, a 2.25 mile stretch for leisure kayaking and canoeing. The long bypass will have Class II and III rapids, which are appropriate for families and individuals wanting a leisurely trip down the river, said Duke spokesman Ben Williamson. The short bypass will have faster water flowing over three-quarters of a mile that will have Class III and IV rapids and is geared more to experienced kayakers, said Christy Churchill, recreation planner for Duke.

Duke can control how much water it releases into the channels. Tourists will be able to check the flow schedules online, or through an app, when planning trips.

To date, Duke has built the Nitrolee Access Area with restrooms and parking for 100 vehicles. Nitrolee will be the primary public hub for access the Great Falls Reservoir and the long bypass. Adjacent to the parking lot on property owned by the Catawba Valley Land Trust is the Arc Building that was part of the Nitrolee plant in the early 1900s. The historic building will become the visitor’s center.

Within a year of the project’s completion, the site will be connected to the Carolina Thread Trail, a regional network of “connected greenways, trails and blueways that reaches 15 counties,” according to the trail’s website.

Another component of the project will be a state park on Dearborn Island. Duke is providing money to the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism to help the state develop a park on the 600-acre island with trails, Churchill said. Construction on the park, which will have a campground area, will begin once the lease with Duke and SCPRT is finalized, she said.

Duke also will build a pedestrian bridge from a kayak launch to provide access to the island.

Fanning said ideas are floating to offer a unique camping experience, including “glamping,” or glamorous camping, where campers stay in modern-day yurts. He said Dearborn Island will be the third state park in Chester County, which is rare in S.C.

“We have plenty of regular camping and so this island is going to be a way for you to spend time on a campground and have a different form of camping,” Fanning said.

Duke also will create a trail, roughly half a mile, on Mountain Island at the Cedar Creek Reservoir that will allow kayakers to hike back and put their kayaks back in the water.

Churchill said the Dearborn project is unique.

“I would bet in the country, it’s pretty one-of-a-kind,” Churchill said. “It’s like an engineered system to enhance the natural experience.”

Glinda Price Coleman, executive director of the Great Falls Town Home Association, said the return of the water is a “game changer” since the mills closed in the 1980s.

“And since then, there’s been several attempts to do something to punch up the economic structure here in town,” she said.

The Great Falls Home Town Association is a community and economic development nonprofit that has rallied to have nature-based tourism brought to Great Falls and the surrounding community since 2000, Coleman said.

Coleman said developers and businesses are looking into the area, but could not elaborate on specific plans. The plan now is to bring opportunities for local entrepreneurship and attract businesses to set up shop, Coleman said.

Coleman said an array of business would “be another layer of what will bring people here, not only the natural beauty that we have in the area and outdoor recreation opportunities that we have with the trails and the whitewater and the state park.”

Data produced by the nonprofit, American Whitewater, estimates that whitewater activities alone will bring $3.1-$4.6 million to Great Falls annually. Coleman has said it will likely exceed that.

“I think it’s providing (Great Falls) a catalyst to begin work from their perspective and from their point-of-view building back their town,” Churchill said. “We’re building the recreation and then from there, hopefully they can build up interest in the general public and tourism to come down to this area and go rafting, go to the park on the trails, and hopefully bring some economic benefit to the area.”

Fanning said Chester County has been “looking for that next big thing and the timing is perfect.”

He pointed to California-based wine giant E&J Gallo, which is building its first East Coast facility in Fort Lawn, a small town in Chester County.

Fanning said the Dearborn project “will be the single largest development, economic development, dollar amount that we’ve seen in a project that was not a business in the history of Chester County.”

Fanning said 53 business leaders, residents and town officials from Chester, Lancaster, York and Fairfield counties meet every month to discuss the project.

“I don’t want it just to have water that comes down at a high speed,” Fanning said. “We’re looking to promote this as a destination for people to come and spend their time and just take advantage of spending time outdoors.”

Fanning said community members have met with investors to promote the area. The discussions have centered around Great Falls but Fanning is touting Eastern Chester County as the “outdoor recreational capital of the Southeast.”

He said the experience will be “phenomenal.”

“You think about the fact that people have been doing indoor whitewater rafting in Charlotte forever,” Fanning said. “Meaning we know there’s a demand, we know that we’re going to have people coming from all over and it’s going to be spectacular.”

Kayakers can visit the U.S. National Whitewater Center in nearby Charlotte, but the Great Falls project is not an event venue or center, Churchill said.

“They are totally different animals,” Churchill said.

The Great Falls whitewater experience comes from a free-flowing channel.

“Obviously the structures that we’re building to help manage the flow is man-made,” Churchill said. “However, the channel itself and all the features, the scenery, it’s all nature.”

Fanning said a year ago, locals were “rolling their eyes and saying here’s another promise that will never come to pass.”

But now you can drive down S.C. 21 and you can see the work, he added.

“This is going to happen,” Fanning said. “It will happen within the next year and it will be phenomenal.”

Here's how Clemson basketball beat USC Upstate behind Alex Hemenway's 3-point shooting

CLEMSON – Alex Hemenway attempted one 3-pointer in Clemson's previous game.That's just not enough.Hemenway, a senior who is one of the best long-distance shooters in the ACC at 41%, went 4-for-6 and scored a career-best 18 points Tuesday night as Clemson beat USC Upstate, 81-70, at Littlejohn Coliseum."It's finding your spots," Hemenway said. "My teammates did a great job of finding me when I'm open. So, all credit to them. I'm just there as a recipient of a great pass."...

CLEMSON – Alex Hemenway attempted one 3-pointer in Clemson's previous game.

That's just not enough.

Hemenway, a senior who is one of the best long-distance shooters in the ACC at 41%, went 4-for-6 and scored a career-best 18 points Tuesday night as Clemson beat USC Upstate, 81-70, at Littlejohn Coliseum.

"It's finding your spots," Hemenway said. "My teammates did a great job of finding me when I'm open. So, all credit to them. I'm just there as a recipient of a great pass."

Clemson (2-1) bounced back from a 60-58 loss Friday at South Carolina. USC Upstate falls to 1-2 with back-to-back defeats against ACC teams. The Spartans lost Friday to Duke.

Hall monitor:Clemson basketball's P.J. Hall returns from injury, makes debut against South Carolina

Hemenway made his only 3-point attempt against South Carolina but was just 1-for-6 in the opening game against The Citadel.

"We've encouraged him to be a little bit more aggressive when he can," Clemson coach Brad Brownell said. "... Certainly, it was good to see him knock in a couple day."

Chase Hunter led Clemson with 20 points, Brevin Galloway had 15 and P.J. Hall had 13. Hunter Tyson added 12 rebounds to go with eight points.

Clemson getting points at the point

Hunter, as a first-year starting point guard, is averaging 18.7 points per game and has been surpassed 20 in two of the three. His ability to get to the basket gives the Tigers something they didn't have last season with Nick Honor and Al-Amir Dawes, both of whom transferred out.

"He puts more direct pressure in the paint because he can finish in there," Brownell said. "That's the advantage. He's done a nice job of showing some poise when he's gotten in there. ... He's played extremely well. Tonight, was incredible. We're asking him to do a lot with handling the ball and getting over guys involved."

P.J. Hall working way back into shape

Hall, a 6-foot-10 junior center from Spartanburg (Dorman High), missed most of preseason and didn't play in Clemson's first game because he was working his way back from knee surgery. For the second straight game, he played about 20 minutes off the bench. He was 6-for-11 shooting with two rebounds and three fouls. Brownell said he would grade Hall's conditioning as a C+ so far and it might be a little while until he's back to all-ACC form.

"The hard part is he needs to play," Brownell said. "You can watch him and see he is very talented so he can score some. But he's really not moving as well as he was last year. It's normal ... What you would expect it to be for a guy who's been out."

Brad Brownell impressed with USC Upstate

USC Upstate was picked for last place in its Big South division and had the lowest vote total of the 12 teams in the league. Brownell isn't buying that prediction. The Spartans (1-2) are young, but talented. Sophomore guard Jordan Gainey led all scorers and matched a career-high with 24 points (8-for-6) and added five rebounds. He was Big South freshman of the year last season.

"He's talented," Brownell said. "There's a reason they're doing all the things they're doing with him because he can put it in the basket. ... Give (USC Upstate coach) Dave Dickerson credit. I thought he had his guys really ready. ... Dave does a really good job with them. They play hard. ... I told our team that (Upstate) has some high major physical tools in terms of athleticism and physicality."

Closing the Fall In Columbia

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Vanderbilt swimming travels to Columbia, South Carolina, for the last scheduled competition of the fall season when the Commodores take part in the Gamecock Invitational.Vandy will face host South Carolina, Florida Gulf Coast, Gardner-Webb, Georgia Southern, UNC-Wilmington, and North Florida in a three-day meet starting on Wednesday and continuing through Friday at the Carolina Natatorium. Each day the preliminary events will begin at 9 a.m. CT, and the finals will start at 6 p.m.&ldquo...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Vanderbilt swimming travels to Columbia, South Carolina, for the last scheduled competition of the fall season when the Commodores take part in the Gamecock Invitational.

Vandy will face host South Carolina, Florida Gulf Coast, Gardner-Webb, Georgia Southern, UNC-Wilmington, and North Florida in a three-day meet starting on Wednesday and continuing through Friday at the Carolina Natatorium. Each day the preliminary events will begin at 9 a.m. CT, and the finals will start at 6 p.m.

“There is not much difference in the preparation for a meet like this, it’s more about the process of how to manage a three-day event that mimics somewhat what the SEC Championships will be,” said head coach Jeremy Organ. “We need to keep our mindset on competing day after day after day and focus on all the little details that go into that to be able to have good performances every day.”

Vandy—now 4-3 on the current season—last competed Nov. 5 against Richmond and Queens in a two-day tri-meet at the Levine Aquatic Center. The Dores earned a split, defeating Richmond 172.5-142.5 while falling to host Queens, 181-134.

The Dores’ had multiple event victories, with Kailia Utley winning twice and Ellie Taliaferro, Maddie Smith, and Emma Dalton all finishing the fastest in their respective races to aid Vanderbilt in its victory over the Spiders. Taliaferro’s performances in the 100 freestyle and 200 individual medley were both new career-best times, and she now holds the eighth-fastest mark in the program’s history in the latter event.

Additionally, Gabriela Pierobon Mays, Karsyn Cook, Alina Stout, Taylor Carey, and Ryen Bosuro posted top-three marks in their respective races.

This will be Vanderbilt’s first time taking part in a meet of this size since the TYR ‘85 Invite in November 2019, where the Dores finished third out of the nine competing programs.

“I think this meet will give us a good window into where we are at as a group at this point of the season, which is still only the halfway mark,” Organ said. “This is kind of like a mid-term exam, if you will, and so we should be able to see what we are doing well and what do we need to improve on. It should give us really good markers of what to focus on for the second half of the season.”

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