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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Great Falls, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Great Falls:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Great Falls, SC

Public access to Duke Energy’s Great Falls enhancement project set to open

GREAT FALLS, S.C. – Public access to a portion of Duke Energy’s Great Falls enhancement project is set to open on March 18, 2023, with scheduled recreation flow releases and the opening of the Nitrolee Access Area. Recreation flow releases to the short bypass reach will begin in May of this year.“We’re looking forward to sharing these new opportunities with the public,” said Christy Churchill, recreation project manager at Duke Energy. “With improvements like boater access, parking, an interpretive ...

GREAT FALLS, S.C. – Public access to a portion of Duke Energy’s Great Falls enhancement project is set to open on March 18, 2023, with scheduled recreation flow releases and the opening of the Nitrolee Access Area. Recreation flow releases to the short bypass reach will begin in May of this year.

“We’re looking forward to sharing these new opportunities with the public,” said Christy Churchill, recreation project manager at Duke Energy. “With improvements like boater access, parking, an interpretive center, trails and, of course, river stretches for novice to experienced canoers and kayakers alike, this area will have a lot to offer the community.”

Duke Energy has nearly completed construction work on the significant recreational and environmental enhancements at Great Falls Reservoir. The project returns water to two river channels that were dewatered when the Great Falls Hydro Station was constructed in 1907, restoring habitat for aquatic life and creating recreational opportunities for the public.

“After working on this project with Duke Energy for many years, we know this is going to be a wonderful boost for economic development in Great Falls,” said Glinda Coleman, the executive director of the Great Falls Hometown Association. “We have been thrilled to be a part of this process and look forward to continued collaboration with Duke Energy on this project and in the future.”

Modification of the dam that creates the long bypass river channel includes the creation of two release points for flow. One will be used to provide a continuous flow for improving aquatic habitat downstream of the diversion dam as well as recreational flow. The other entrance will be used only for flow for recreational use, helping to provide a safe access route into the river for boaters who wish to navigate the more than 2 miles of the downstream river channel. This original section of the river contains Class II and III rapids.

Farther south on Great Falls Reservoir, pneumatically controlled steel gates have been installed on more than 500 feet of the short bypass concrete dams to provide aquatic flow releases, recreation flow releases and flood management. This section of river will be accessed from the Great Falls canoe/kayak access trail on Mountain Island. The river section downstream of this area is approximately 0.75 mile long, and the recreation flow releases will have a rapid flow of water that is expected to create Class III and IV rapids for advanced paddlers.

Beginning spring of 2023, those wishing to enjoy these recreational opportunities should view scheduled recreation flow releases by visiting duke-energy.com/lakes. Recreational releases are scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is important to note that water will rise quickly in the bypass channel.

The public can access the long bypass reach from the Nitrolee Access Area, also opening March 18. In addition to parking, restrooms and boat access, the Nitrolee site features an interpretive center about the remains of the original historic Arc Building that was part of the early 1900s Nitrolee fertilizer plant. The site, which is owned by the Katawba Valley Land Trust and leased to Duke Energy, is planned to be connected to the lower Great Falls sites by the Carolina Thread Trail.

Other recreational improvements will be added to further support the Great Falls flow release project in the coming years. The South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism also plans to open a new state park later this decade on Dearborn Island at Great Falls. In addition to the new state park, Duke Energy will be constructing a pedestrian bridge to the island as well as two additional canoe/kayak access areas along with other planned improvements to better support the user experiences.

All these public recreational and environmental enhancements were part of the vision for the river and lake system that was negotiated and included in the Comprehensive Relicensing Agreement, a binding contract signed in 2006 by 70 parties to guide relicensing of Duke Energy's Catawba-Wateree Hydro Project.

Duke Energy Carolinas, a subsidiary of Duke Energy, owns 20,100 megawatts of energy capacity, supplying electricity to 2.8 million residential, commercial and industrial customers across a 24,000-square-mile service area in North Carolina and South Carolina.

Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK), a Fortune 150 company headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., is one of America’s largest energy holding companies. Its electric utilities serve 8.2 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, and collectively own 50,000 megawatts of energy capacity. Its natural gas unit serves 1.6 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio and Kentucky. The company employs 28,000 people.

Duke Energy is executing an aggressive clean energy transition to achieve its goals of net-zero methane emissions from its natural gas business and at least a 50% carbon reduction from electric generation by 2030 and net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The 2050 net-zero goals also include Scope 2 and certain Scope 3 emissions. In addition, the company is investing in major electric grid enhancements and energy storage, and exploring zero-emission power generation technologies such as hydrogen and advanced nuclear.

Duke Energy was named to Fortune’s 2022 “World’s Most Admired Companies” list and Forbes’ “America’s Best Employers” list. More information is available at duke-energy.com. The Duke Energy News Center contains news releases, fact sheets, photos and videos. Duke Energy’s illumination features stories about people, innovations, community topics and environmental issues. Follow Duke Energy on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook.

Contact: Ellen Morton Office: 704.254.8760 | 24-Hour: 800.559.3853

Duke Energy Transforms Catawba River in Great Falls, SC

New whitewater runs give kayaking, fishing and tourism a boostSubmitted by Duke EnergyTim Huffman stands in awe as water flows down a scenic stretch of the Catawba River.“From rolling waves of granite to 40-foot rock bluffs, it’s not the sort of geology you’d expect to see in this part of South Carolina,” said Huffman, senior project manager at Duke Energy. “It’s like a transport to the mountains.”Despite its natural beauty, the town of Great Falls, S.C., has been economic...

New whitewater runs give kayaking, fishing and tourism a boost

Submitted by Duke Energy

Tim Huffman stands in awe as water flows down a scenic stretch of the Catawba River.

“From rolling waves of granite to 40-foot rock bluffs, it’s not the sort of geology you’d expect to see in this part of South Carolina,” said Huffman, senior project manager at Duke Energy. “It’s like a transport to the mountains.”

Despite its natural beauty, the town of Great Falls, S.C., has been economically depressed since its textile mills closed in the 1980s. Tourism is expected to rise, however, as a result of new whitewater runs, a state park, hiking trails and other projects at Great Falls Reservoir.

“People are going to have a great deal of fun out here,” Huffman said. “They can fish, kayak, canoe, stand-up paddleboard, whitewater raft, you name it.”

One of two whitewater runs, the long bypass river channel, is open to the public during scheduled flow releases. It is a free community resource that will complement a diverse mix of other recreation in the coming years, said Christy Churchill, recreation project manager at Duke Energy.

“From a pedestrian bridge that will connect to a new state park at Dearborn Island, and all sorts of hiking trails, you don’t have to be a kayaker to enjoy it here,” Churchill said. “Maybe you like to fish, flat-water paddle, or just walk the trails and look at historic interpretation information.”

As part of its Catawba-Wateree license, issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Duke Energy enhanced public recreation, as well as habitat for fish and other aquatic life, a collaborative process with stakeholders in communities where its hydro facilities are located.

As a result, the company can meet customers’ needs with sustainable, carbon-free electricity. The Catawba-Wateree Hydro Project, 12 hydro stations and 11 reservoirs in North Carolina and South Carolina, generates 799 megawatts of electricity, which, on average, is enough to power more than 639,000 homes. Hydropower also contributes to decarbonizing the Duke Energy grid.

To build the whitewater runs, the company returned water to a river channel that was diverted in 1907 to create the Great Falls and Dearborn Hydroelectric plants to produce power. Huffman’s team modified two dams, bringing a managed flow of water to the long and short bypasses.

“It’s a first-of-its-kind project for Duke Energy,” he said. “You’re looking at seven years of work from concept to final engineering and then another two years to construct it. So, it’s extremely complex.”

Duke Energy consulted S2O Design and Engineering, the same team that worked on the U.S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte, N.C.

Kayakers, paddlers and others who wish to navigate the long bypass river channel, a 2.25-mile downstream channel with rapids the paddling community has classified as Class II and III rapids, during scheduled flow releases can do so through the Nitrolee Access Area.

Farther south on Great Falls Reservoir, pneumatically controlled steel gates were installed to provide aquatic flows, recreation flow releases and flood management. The .75-mile short bypass river channel will have a faster flow of water than the long bypass river channel, creating rapids for skilled paddlers.

It’s an exciting time for an area that hasn’t attracted many tourists, said Glinda Coleman, executive director of the Great Falls Home Town Association.

“I’ve heard nothing but positive comments from folks. People are excited,” Coleman said, “because we know it’s going to be a wonderful boost for economic development in Great Falls.”

A bar opened in town, she said, and people have begun to look at vacant properties along Main Street; others have expressed an interest in building campgrounds in the town that’s located about halfway between Charlotte and Columbia, S.C.

“Duke Energy went out of its way to help us connect the town of Great Falls, its downtown area to all of the projects,” Coleman said.

“And that’s what we strived for: ensuring our community benefits from all this development. So, we’ve appreciated the partnership tremendously.”

Just as important as making it fun, Huffman said, was including safety features. It’s why the river is channelized toward the west bank.

“If a trip doesn’t go as planned, a person would naturally go with the flow toward the bank where there are other people,” he said, “or to an area where they can self-rescue.”

Self-rescue features – exit steps, rescue rings and grab bars, for example – were installed throughout the long bypass structure. And Huffman noted other design safety elements, like energy dissipation pools.

“We’re required to put about 3,000 cubic feet of water each second into the river as part of the official recreation release,” Huffman said. “That’s a lot of water. It would be like 3,000 basketballs coming at you at once.”

During recreation flow releases, the boater bypass channel will be carrying a smaller portion of that, about 400 cubic feet a second.

A healthy aquatic habitat for fish and other wildlife was created. Rock surfaces, placed by hand to blend in with the environment, also aerate the water.

“If you’re a fish, and you get a chance to swim in freshly aerated water, you’re going to do it,” Huffman said. “Those rocks will greatly enhance the habitat of the area for fish while creating a natural setting.”

And the catfish here are “just monsters. They’re huge,” he added with a laugh.

Of bringing the project to life, Huffman called it the pinnacle of his career. Even better, he said, might be the community’s response.

“It’s just amazing to see people going down these channels,” he said. “I believe it’s a great community resource that does nothing but forecast a bright future for this town.”

More improvements coming

In the coming years, Churchill said Duke Energy has also committed to:

More information about flow releases at Great Falls and other Duke Energy facilities: Recreation flow schedule

View original content here

Duke Energy

Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK), a Fortune 150 company headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., is one of America’s largest energy holding companies. Its electric utilities serve 8.2 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, and collectively own 50,000 megawatts of energy capacity. Its natural gas unit serves 1.6 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio and Kentucky. The company employs 27,600 people.

Duke Energy is executing an ambitious clean energy transition to achieve its goals of net-zero methane emissions from its natural gas business by 2030 and net-zero carbon emissions from electricity generation by 2050. The company has interim carbon emission targets of at least 50% reduction from electric generation by 2030, 50% for Scope 2 and certain Scope 3 upstream and downstream emissions by 2035, and 80% from electric generation by 2040. In addition, the company is investing in major electric grid enhancements and energy storage, and exploring zero-emission power generation technologies such as hydrogen and advanced nuclear.

Duke Energy was named to Fortune’s 2023 “World’s Most Admired Companies” list and Forbes’ “World’s Best Employers” list. More information is available at duke-energy.com. The Duke Energy News Center contains news releases, fact sheets, photos and videos. Duke Energy’s illumination features stories about people, innovations, community topics and environmental issues. Follow Duke Energy on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook.

Officers get a boost in efforts to protect people who go to the rapids in Great Falls

Duke Energy gave the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources a more than $18,000 grant Monday that will buy wet and dry suits, flotation devices, rafts, helmets and other equipment for officers who serve at the new rapids in Great Falls.A new swift water rescue unit formed when Catawba River water was routed back to Great Falls after more than a century. The water had been diverted to power mills in the area.A new whitewater area opened in March for rapids enthusiasts.The restoration of Great Falls came as part of...

Duke Energy gave the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources a more than $18,000 grant Monday that will buy wet and dry suits, flotation devices, rafts, helmets and other equipment for officers who serve at the new rapids in Great Falls.

A new swift water rescue unit formed when Catawba River water was routed back to Great Falls after more than a century. The water had been diverted to power mills in the area.

A new whitewater area opened in March for rapids enthusiasts.

The restoration of Great Falls came as part of Duke Energy’s federal hydroelectric relicensing. The company needs federal approval to manage the Catawba River and its reservoir as it generates power. The most recent relicensing project involved a host of public recreation improvements across Lake Wylie and other reservoirs, including the Great Falls addition.

According to SCDNR, the rapids in Great Falls, which is expected to be a regional draw, creates different safety needs compared to nearby Fishing Creek or Lake Wateree.

“It’s really to help us have a uniform, safe approach to anything that requires swift water rescue equipment or personnel to be able to have a successful operation and outcome,” said Lt. Brady Branham, head of the new SCDNR rescue unit.

Officers in that unit spent four days near Lake Wylie dam training on nighttime operations, rescue swimming, rescue boat operations and rope techniques in preparation of what they may face in Great Falls, according to Duke.

Monday’s grant was part of a $500,000 award to various groups as part of Duke’s programs on emergency and storm preparations.

“These grants will help provide fellow first responders with the tools and training to handle whatever Mother Nature throws our way,” said Mike Callahan, Duke’s South Carolina state president.

State Sen. Mike Fanning said he expects the Great Falls whitewater to be a game changing amenity for the region.

“It can’t work if we don’t have ways of keeping people safe,” Fanning said. “Allowing SCDNR to do their jobs with the resources they need is going to be critical to helping this go long term.”

Whitewater rapids are back at Great Falls. How does it compare to Charlotte’s?

A new water attraction on the Catawba River in Chester County opens this weekend which is expected to offer outdoor activities and boost the local economy.For years, Duke Energy has been working on the Great Falls enhancement project to provide recreational and environmental enhancements at Great Falls Reservoir in South Carolina, ...

A new water attraction on the Catawba River in Chester County opens this weekend which is expected to offer outdoor activities and boost the local economy.

For years, Duke Energy has been working on the Great Falls enhancement project to provide recreational and environmental enhancements at Great Falls Reservoir in South Carolina, WSOC-TV reported.

“This project, we are opening, will allow people to go into the long bypass reach of the river, which over the past century, has been dry,” said Tim Huffman, senior project manager at Duke Energy.

With the Great Falls Reservoir opening, there’s now two major water outdoor attractions in the area that residents can access along with the U.S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte.

Here’s what both attractions offer visitors:

528 Catawba River Road, Great Falls, SC 29055

Some of the waterways will be open to the public on Saturday, with scheduled recreation flow releases and the opening of the Nitrolee Access Area.

There are two release points for flow, one for improving aquatic habitat downstream and recreational flow, and another for recreational flow with a safe access route for boaters.

There will also be a separate rapid flow of water for advanced paddlers expected to open later this year.

“This is a natural river flow, and you have two miles of whitewater that you access through the structures that we have built,” Tim Huffman, senior project manager at Duke Energy, told WSOC-TV.

Visitors will be able to kayak, canoe, raft, paddle and boat along the river for free. You will need to bring your own equipment. Recreational releases are scheduled from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. You can find scheduled recreation flow releases online at duke-energy.com/lakes.

A state park, a small island, and walking trails will also be added in the coming years.

5000 Whitewater Center Parkway, Charlotte, NC 28214

The Whitewater Center is an outdoor center with more than 30 recreational activities, including whitewater and flatwater rafting, kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding.

The flatwater activities take place on the Catawba River and Long Creek. The whitewater activities take place on the center’s man-made river, which comprises four sections of whitewater: the instruction, freestyle, wilderness, and competition channels. Each feature has different wave levels.

Visitors will need to bring their own equipment, but the Whitewater Center does provide rental kayaks.

The Whitewater Center also has yoga, climbing, ropes, zip lines, and trails for mountain biking, running or hiking. There is also space for deep water solo and ice skating.

Visiting the U.S. Whitewater Center is free, but a pass is required for activities. You can purchase single activity passes, all-access day passes or all-access annual passes either online, onsite, or by phone at (704) 391-3900. Available activities for each day can be found on the center’s website at center.whitewater.org.

This story was originally published March 17, 2023, 2:59 PM.

New water attraction in Chester County already making waves

The Great Falls Enhancement Project sits on the Catawba River and provides recreational activities at the Great Falls Reservoir.More VideosCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. — There's a new way for people to enjoy the water and the weather in Chester County.The Great Falls Enhancement Project s...

The Great Falls Enhancement Project sits on the Catawba River and provides recreational activities at the Great Falls Reservoir.

More Videos

CHESTER COUNTY, S.C. — There's a new way for people to enjoy the water and the weather in Chester County.

The Great Falls Enhancement Project sits on the Catawba River and provides recreational activities at the Great Falls Reservoir.

It's been a project almost two decades in the making. Sandy Skardon is one of the first people to experience the project.

“It was going good, some of the waves were in," Skardon said. Yeah, it was pretty awesome."

Tim Huffman is the project manager and said it took a lot of time and effort to figure out the design. The water in the area was held back by a dam for decades. The company worked to move water back into the original channels, creating over two miles of white water access.

“If you don’t paddle a lick, you can go out there, walk around, walk the trails, it’ll be well worth the time," Huffman said.

Huffman also said it'll become a tourist spot for the area. On Sunday, people already made their way out to the spot from all over the Carolinas. People told WCNC Charlotte they are excited about the new destination and can't wait to dive in once the temps heat up.

Others said the new spot could add congestion to the area. Martin Kennington lives in the area and can see how this area could get too busy.

“It concerns me with all the extra traffic that people will come down and take advantage of it," Kennington said.

But others think this will impact the area in a different way.

“It will be something good for Lancaster County because it’s not as big as Rock Hill and it’s in the middle of nowhere, traffic will be good for the area," Gregory Chisolm said.

Tenitia Brown is the owner of Red Rose Patrys in Lancaster County. She said she mainly caters to those in the area, but with the new attraction, she's excited to be in the impact zone.

“It means we are going to be okay as a small business, we get a chance to expand so any type of new traffic is going to be great," Brown said.

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