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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Great Falls, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Great Falls:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Great Falls, SC

Born Over a Blunt, a Growing Dinner Series Captures Prime Tomato Time in Virginia

Located 90 minutes from D.C. down I-95, Hanover County, Virginia is widely considered the Napa Valley of tomatoes. From its ideal temperatures to fertile, loamy soil, all the right conditions converge to produce an abundance of top-tier, juicy spheres every summer.The tomato hotspot is a longtime source of pride for its Richmond region, with a 44-year-old Tomato Festival that draws up to 40,000 fans of the fruit to Pole Green Park in Mechanicsville, Virginia every July. Now, a new dinner series that got its start during the pandemic c...

Located 90 minutes from D.C. down I-95, Hanover County, Virginia is widely considered the Napa Valley of tomatoes. From its ideal temperatures to fertile, loamy soil, all the right conditions converge to produce an abundance of top-tier, juicy spheres every summer.

The tomato hotspot is a longtime source of pride for its Richmond region, with a 44-year-old Tomato Festival that draws up to 40,000 fans of the fruit to Pole Green Park in Mechanicsville, Virginia every July. Now, a new dinner series that got its start during the pandemic connects chefs, farmers, sommeliers, and guests to the homegrown heirloom tomatoes they adore. In its second year, Summer Supper Somm is the brainchild of Village Garden farmers David and Barbara Hunsaker and Barboursville Vineyards sommelier Jason Tesauro.

“The idea for [the series] was hatched over tomato sammies and a blunt or two last summer,” David Hunsaker tells Eater. “Jason [Tesauro] and I were musing about all the love area chefs have for our heirlooms and the rich history of the tomato in Hanover County.”

Instead of throwing one event, they decided to spread the tomato series all around the state. Over 20 dinners bounce around Richmond, Virginia Beach, Great Falls, and D.C. to celebrate the season with tomato-obsessed tasting menus and Virginia wines through mid-August. From their humble, one-acre farm in Hanover County, the Hunsakers grow a staggering 300 varieties of heirloom tomatoes — from Radiator Charlie’s Mortgage Lifter to the Yellow Oxheart — that get plucked and put on full display for the series.

Summer Supper Somm still lingers in Richmond at restaurants like Lemaire, The Lobby Bar at Quirk RVA, and Shagbark, where each chef puts their own stamp on the starring ingredient. Richmond-based private chef Manny Baiden teams up with Richwine, a natural biodynamic wine delivery service, on Monday, July 25, to showcase Village Garden’s tomatoes and his Ghanian upbringing on the same plate.

“Growing up, my mom and I would go to Kaneshie market in Accra, Ghana,” says Baiden. “She’d have me pick the firm and ripe tomatoes so she could stew them for jollof rice — a staple Ghanian dish that I look forward to serving at the dinner.”

The sole D.C. restaurant in the series is Eater 38’s No Goodbyes in the Line Hotel, where chef Opie Crooks puts his spin on the circular summer nightshade during a dinner on Thursday, August 4.

The Adams Morgan attraction for locavores will release tickets for the 40-seat affair soon. Local rye toast topped with tomatoes and a pasta base made from tomato leaves could make appearances across courses, says Crooks, all washed down with a vodka cocktail built with clarified tomato water, ginger, lemon, and coriander by barman Lukas Smith. (Crooks’s current menu shows off shipments from Moon Valley Farm in Woodsboro, Maryland, which grew its first-ever cherry tomatoes this year.)

A week later, one of the D.C. area’s fanciest French restaurants L’Auberge Chez Francois hosts a dinner on Thursday, August 11 on its idyllic six-acre grounds in Great Falls.

Summer Supper Somm touches down as far west as Staunton, Virginia at The Shack, where James Beard-nominated chef Ian Boden will give the summer fruit the five-course tasting menu treatment, and as far east as Virginia Beach at Zoe’s Seafood and Steak, where the seasonal series concludes on Thursday, August 18.

Richmond-based Duke’s Mayonnaise, a sandwich staple slathered on sliced tomatoes and white bread everywhere this time of year, is a big sponsor of the series. “Duke’s and tomatoes share a rich history, as tomatoes have long been a focal point of Southern gardens and summer suppers,” says Duke’s brand manager Rebecca Lupesco.

The white condiment celebrates its perfect partnership with the tomato with its own week-long festival, dubbed Duke’s Hot Tomato Summer. For the second year, 70 participating restaurants across Richmond and the mayo’s Greenville, S.C. birthplace pair Duke’s with tomato dishes through Sunday, July 24. Proceeds go to Shalom Farms to help them grow more tomatoes.

—Tierney Plumb contributed to this report

Montana Marijuana Businesses Face Seemingly Endless Cycle Of Local Votes On Allowing Them To Operate

“What other business would people accept being in the position of potentially losing their business every two years?”By Emily Tschetter, Daily MontananKendrick Richmond moved from South Carolina to Philipsburg to start work at his friend’s dispensary when it opened in June 2021 and had no interest in getting involved in local politics.As a long-time medical marijuana user himself, Richmond came to help people find products that fit their needs and was delighted when recreationa...

“What other business would people accept being in the position of potentially losing their business every two years?”

By Emily Tschetter, Daily Montanan

Kendrick Richmond moved from South Carolina to Philipsburg to start work at his friend’s dispensary when it opened in June 2021 and had no interest in getting involved in local politics.

As a long-time medical marijuana user himself, Richmond came to help people find products that fit their needs and was delighted when recreational sales became reality in Granite County on January 1.

He said Top Shelf Botanicals, the sole dispensary in Granite County, sees upwards of 80 percent of its customer base come in without green cards, but almost all are seeking relief for medical issues.

“If they don’t have green cards they’re alienated to a degree, and now they can come in regardless,” Richmond said. “I’m basically a car salesman. I’m just here to put you in the right model with the right strain based on what you’re telling me.”

Legalization meant the business could help more people, but he never expected it would put Top Shelf Botanicals in a precarious state.

Montana first passed medical marijuana in 2004. Then, a bill in 2011 squashed most access to medical pot until a ballot initiative approved by 58 percent of voters revamped it in 2016.

Four years later, Montanans said yes to recreational marijuana with nearly 57 percent of the vote. Initiative 190 legalized adult-use cannabis by default in the counties that voted for it; it meant voters in the other counties would have to bring the matter to the ballot again for legalization in their jurisdictions.

In 2021, with as much as $52 million projected to fill state coffers annually through new tax revenue, the Montana Legislature hammered out implementation of recreational weed in House Bill 701. One provision allows counties and municipalities to vote to opt out of legalization.

This year, the state has pulled in $18.7 million in new revenue so far, but the opt-out provision has uprooted Richmond’s sense of stability in the new recreational market for small dispensaries like Top Shelf Botanicals.

Now, cannabis businesses and advocates see no end in sight for counties re-voting on the issue. Kate Cholewa, government affairs lobbyist with the Cannabis Industry Association, said the upending of the recreational market through opt-out votes is not fair for dispensaries.

“The opt-out provision is very problematic, and I think it’s more problematic than people recognized at the time. What other business would people accept being in the position of potentially losing their business every two years?” Cholewa said. “That’s the position they’ve all been put in. They’ve put it in local governments’ hands to destroy millions of dollars in investment. The provision is just patently unfair.”

Top Shelf Botanicals expanded to recreational sales when legalization took effect on January 1, and Richmond was disappointed when not even six months later, Granite County opted out of adult-use cannabis sales on June 7. Voters there had approved I-190 by nearly 55 percent, and he said he feels frustrated that his dispensary’s non-medical sales will end on September 4, just months after beginning.

In response, Richmond drafted a new initiative within two days of the primary and is now using the same provision in HB 701 to collect petition signatures to get the recreational question back on the ballot. If successful, the measure could make Granite County the first in Montana to opt out and then opt back into adult-use cannabis after the initial 2020 vote.

As of the beginning of July he had fewer than 100 signatures of the roughly 375 needed, or 15 percent of the county’s population, by August 8 to get it on the November ballot.

“With gas prices and crazy inflation, telling people that have a need for this after September 4 that they need to go to another city is just disheartening,” Richmond said. “With a new vote, we can hopefully move on and realize it doesn’t harm children or deplete resources when regulated correctly. Prohibition doesn’t solve anything.”

Meanwhile, according to Steve Zabawa, founder of anti-recreational weed coalition Safe Montana, petitioning efforts are underway in Cascade County, Carbon County, Ravalli County, and Flathead County, among others, to opt out of adult-use cannabis legalization.

“Thank the Lord that in House Bill 701, there’s an opt-out provision for counties and municipalities that did not like the way it ended up.” Zabawa said. “It’s not up to county commissioners to decide. It’s up to voters now that everything has settled down, and we know exactly where the money is going and what the effects are.”

Since the I-190 vote in 2020, Dawson County has been the only county to opt into adult-use cannabis regulation after turning it down by 53.6 percent. Granite County has been the only one to opt out, so half of Montana’s 56 counties have recreational sales bans in place because their voters turned down the initiative.

Some major municipalities also have special restrictions, like Billings opting out within city limits in a 2021 ballot initiative. Other cities have heavy recreational sale zoning limits, like Kalispell restricting dispensaries only to industrial zones within city limits, and Great Falls zoning adult-use cannabis sales out of city limits entirely.

A dispensary-owning couple is suing Great Falls for the city council’s ban on sales within the city without prior ballot initiative approval, and an initiative solidifying the ban is on the ballot in November.

Rep. Lola Sheldon-Galloway (R) is in support of an official ban in the city and Cascade County partially due to concerns of people driving under the influence of marijuana on the highway next to her home. She also did not approve of how the tax revenue allocation changed between the structure voters approved of in I-190 and the finalized version in HB 701, a criticism Zabawa shares.

“I believe people voted for it, for the funding and where it was going, not really for the recreational marijuana. We want a true vote where we’re asking about marijuana and only marijuana,” Sheldon-Galloway said. “It never should have made it to the ballot with the wording that it had on it because it falsified where the money went.”

Zabawa advocated for the opt-out provision in HB 701 but still brought the funding structure in I-190 to court. His group dropped the lawsuit after the bill’s passage allowed for strict state control over the industry’s regulation and created the main mechanism he is using to overturn legalization in individual counties.

Zabawa, a Billings native, focused the bulk of his efforts since I-190’s passage on campaigning with Safe Montana in Yellowstone County, where voters have seen marijuana measures on Election Day three years in a row. Although Billings opted out of adult-use cannabis sales in 2021 and Yellowstone County narrowly approved of I-190 in 2020, Zabawa’s efforts for Yellowstone County to opt out were unsuccessful on June 7, with 55 percent voting in favor of keeping recreational sales.

Zabawa claims the 2022 ballot text reading “non-medical marijuana” instead of “adult-use cannabis” in the 2021 Billings ballot confused some voters on June 7 and may have influenced the vote outcome.

“If you use the word ‘medical’ it sways about 10 percent of people because they vote in favor even though it has nothing to do with medical marijuana. Nobody knows what non-medical marijuana is,” Zabawa said. “In 2020, there was big money behind the effort. If there’s no money involved and it’s simply ‘yes’ or ‘no’ on recreational, it fails.”

However, Zach Schopp, president of cannabis advocacy group Better for Montana, said the Yellowstone County vote had nothing to do with misinterpretation over the ballot text and was successful because of popular support for legalization.

“Our opposition is grasping at straws, and we could unite against a common enemy in this election. When they took it to the county issue and threatened our livelihoods, we took it personally and had to activate voters, there was no other option,” Schopp said. “If you tell me 7,000 people didn’t know what they were voting for, you must really think we’re stupid. No matter the wording, it’s clear the people want weed.”

It’s not only his opponents who are quibbling about problematic language, though. Richmond also said the confusing ballot text in Granite County may have influenced its result to overturn recreational use.

Zabawa’s plans to work toward banning recreational sales in more parts of the state do not end in his home county. Along with the petitions in counties that saw close margins in the I-190 vote, he has aspirations to get the proposed recreational ban on the ballot in Gallatin County, which voted 65.6 percent in favor of legalization in 2020.

And Safe Montana’s efforts do not end with using HB 701’s opt out provisions. Zabawa said he is looking into employing alternative legal routes, such as modeling legislation off a failed Idaho rule that would make ballot initiative efforts more difficult by raising signature requirements. Opponents of the Idaho legislation, according to US News, said the law would have protected people with “less popular political opinions.”

“Safe Montana is going to use every legal avenue to eliminate recreational marijuana out of the state of Montana and out of the United States,” Zabawa said. “There’s nothing good about dope for our families, that’s why I’m committed to these efforts. People get stoned immediately when they get it, so do we want more stoners? Because that’s what happens when you legalize it.”

So far, Great Falls has the only confirmed adult-use cannabis re-vote on a municipal ballot, but with Safe Montana planning to continue opt-out efforts even past the November election cycle, Richmond hopes Granite County’s possible re-legalization through his initiative will show other opted-out counties that their marijuana policies are not permanent.

“I’ve never had anybody arrested with my products or around town causing problems, so although there’s so much stigma around this little plant in the ground, it gives people so many different reliefs,” Richmond said. “There’s plenty of other things that could be focused on besides this one little pot shop that could barely fit a Volkswagen bug inside of it, and I hope we can move on with this vote.”

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Great Falls makes late push, but it’s not enough in 1A semifinal loss to Calhoun County

It felt as if every Red Devil bucket down the stretch would spark a comeback and give Great Falls a chance to keep its season alive.And the Red Devils did have a chance.Down by as many as 18 points in the fourth quarter, Great Falls used an unrelenting full-court press and a championship will to pull the game’s margin to as little as six with fewer than three minutes remaining. But it ultimately wasn’t enough: The Red Devils fell to Calhoun County, 76-67, in the 1A Upper State championship game on Saturday af...

It felt as if every Red Devil bucket down the stretch would spark a comeback and give Great Falls a chance to keep its season alive.

And the Red Devils did have a chance.

Down by as many as 18 points in the fourth quarter, Great Falls used an unrelenting full-court press and a championship will to pull the game’s margin to as little as six with fewer than three minutes remaining. But it ultimately wasn’t enough: The Red Devils fell to Calhoun County, 76-67, in the 1A Upper State championship game on Saturday afternoon in Bob Jones University’s Davis Field House in Greenville — falling one game short of making its second state championship appearance in three years.

“Tough loss,” Fair told reporters postgame, a few moments before he’d go in and console his team who’d just seen its season end. “We lost to a really good team. It was a game of runs. We had opportunities. I thought we did cash in on those opportunities in the second quarter (but didn’t) in the fourth. ... By the fourth quarter, we wanted to have it to single digits. We cut it, the momentum kind of shifted, but we also kind of forced some turnovers late and just didn’t cash in.”

He added: “To beat a team like Calhoun County, those are the things you gotta cash-in on. And when you don’t, this is the outcome of it.”

Saturday afternoon began as a back-and-forth affair and never stopped.

Calhoun County, with its unrelenting full-court pressure, appeared to rattle the Red Devils to start the game. The Saints pushed the game to a 9-1 margin and forced two key Red Devil starters — point guard Foxx Moore and senior forward Tali Coleman — into early foul trouble.

But Great Falls responded: The team from Chester County earned its first lead, 15-14, with less than 30 seconds left in the first quarter thanks to a contested Dre Coleman layup. A buzzer-beating bank-of-a-3-pointer from Jordan Holmes delivered Great Falls with a 18-14 lead at the end of one.

The Red Devils’ lead ballooned as large as 29-21 — their own full-court press causing Calhoun County headaches, Moore and-one layups keeping the game’s momentum squarely with the Red Devils.

But Calhoun County wouldn’t be denied its moment: The Saints went on a 21-3 run to end the first half — and they used that momentum to carry them through a dominant third quarter, where they led 65-49 heading into the fourth quarter.

For most of the fourth, coach Fair tried just about everything: He played small. He played big — which Great Falls can uniquely do, given its trio of 6-foot-7 contributors (Will Manning and the Coleman brothers).

But turnovers still piled up. Red Devil shooters, other than Region 2-1A Player of the Year Nywun Cloud, stayed cold.

And CC kept going.

The Red Devils made one last push, cutting the game to 69-61 with 4:24 left after a Tali Coleman free throw, and then 69-63 after a Holmes pull-up jumper with 2:50 left. But the Saints put the game away at the free-throw line.

Naasir Guinyard, who finished with 13 points, led the Saints, and Russell Brunson Jr. added 11.

CC will go for its ninth state championship on Friday at USC Aiken at 2 p.m.

The Red Devils saw four players finish in double figures: Cloud (22 points), Jordan Holmes (19), Zae Brown (10) and Dre Coleman (10). Moore finished with three. Aaden Fair finished with two. And Tali Coleman and Will Manning finished with one point apiece.

As the time ran out on Saturday, Great Falls players put towels over their heads, the finality of the season washing over them.

“I’m super proud of these seniors,” said Fair, who finished his third season at the Great Falls helm on Saturday. “Got seven seniors, six players and then Dre Spencer our manager, he’s a senior as well. These kids in three years lost one region game. Won a state championship as sophomores. They wanted to be one of the classes that left two pictures on the wall. We fell short, but again, I’m super proud of them.

“They left their mark behind, the way they fought, competed, day-in and day-out, and now it’s about mentoring the guys coming up behind them.”

This story was originally published February 26, 2022 5:17 PM.

NWS confirms tornado in Chester County, S.C.

All had calmed in Chester County after some tense moments in a tornado warning.CHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WBTV) - Severe weather brought a tornado to Chester County after severe storms rolled through the area Monday, the National Weather Service confirmed Wednesday.According to the NWS, an EF-0 tornado touched down around 6:34 p.m. four miles west of Great Falls.The emergency management director of Chester County told WBTV Tuesday they had been talking to National Weather Service when the tornado warning started.&ldq...

All had calmed in Chester County after some tense moments in a tornado warning.

CHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WBTV) - Severe weather brought a tornado to Chester County after severe storms rolled through the area Monday, the National Weather Service confirmed Wednesday.

According to the NWS, an EF-0 tornado touched down around 6:34 p.m. four miles west of Great Falls.

The emergency management director of Chester County told WBTV Tuesday they had been talking to National Weather Service when the tornado warning started.

“It’s hard to think about it,” says Donna Creed. “It’s hard to believe it happened.”

When Creed got the tornado warning alert on her phone, she took cover with her son in a hallway. Once the coast was clear, she went out to look how her house faired.

”I went out the front door and saw all the trees down. And I said oh honey I think this is a tornado,” she says.

Twisted and snapped trees littered her yard as tree parts were thrown around like they weighed nothing.

”It was unbelievable. You don’t expect that to happen at your house,” she says.

While locked away in the hallway, Creed’s husband was outside working in the shop. He took cover but heard everything that was going on around him.

”He heard a couple big booms. He knew some trees had fallen but he didn’t know the extent,” she says.

Two days after the winds roared, National Weather Service surveyors walked the area checking out the damage. Confirming what the Creeds already felt they knew.

”You’re seeing snapped trees. You’re seeing uprooting of smaller trees. And it’s on a narrow path indicating you had a small feature moving along that had some rotation causing damage,” says NWS Meteorologist Steve Wilkinson.

The surveyors said the EF-0 was pinging their radar when it touched down, but if it was not for Creed calling.

”We probably wouldn’t have found this. So you might of that well this is a false alarm,” says Wilkinson.

The latest info is giving Creed some closure, but for her, the peace of mind is much more valuable.

”We’re just glad we’re safe and our house didn’t get much damage,” says Creed.

Just before Creed had called, the emergency management director thought all had calmed in Chester County after some tense moments in a tornado warning.

”Pretty much no damage was reported. Some limbs and small trees but nothing major,” said Emergency Management Director, Ed Darby, on Tuesday.

That is until Ed Darby got a phone call Tuesday morning. A farm out in the Great Falls area had trees snapped in half and it looked like a tornado could have swept through. When the Emergency Management Director gave NWS the address, he got some important information.

”They said that address was exactly where they thought there was some rotation,” he said.

The damage is on Dewitt and Golf Course Roads in Chester County. The emergency management director says a woman called in saying her trees around her farm looked like they were snapped off.

Trees that were snapped like twigs left a maze of destruction. Some even looked upside down as the tops lay broken on the ground.

The trees however were a great indicator. Darby said if it wasn’t for the phone call, they might not have known an event big enough to call the NWS in even happened.

”If a roof has blown off, yeah we’ll know. But if it’s just people see some trees down there might now be a report about it because it’s not damaged enough to call 911,” he said.

Darby said those reports are crucial to getting data that can later help track patterns or even get grants to rebuild. So the emergency management team can keep helping the people living in the county.

”It’s personal to us. Everything’s Chester to us. We want to take care of our people,” he says.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Effort to Bring Life Back to Great Falls Through Nature-Based Tourism

GREAT FALL, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – The town of Great Falls in Chester County fell on hard times after textile mills closed many years ago, but now new life is being born – using the natural resources the community has to offer on the Catawba River.As part of Duke Energy’s re-licensing of the Catawba River, it will expand the body of water to provide safe recreational use through white-water rapids, kayaking and more – as well as fish and wildlife habitat protection in the Great Falls Reservoir.In 2015 leaders...

GREAT FALL, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – The town of Great Falls in Chester County fell on hard times after textile mills closed many years ago, but now new life is being born – using the natural resources the community has to offer on the Catawba River.

As part of Duke Energy’s re-licensing of the Catawba River, it will expand the body of water to provide safe recreational use through white-water rapids, kayaking and more – as well as fish and wildlife habitat protection in the Great Falls Reservoir.

In 2015 leaders with Duke Energy say it received a new license for the Catawba-Wateree Project which includes the Great Falls-Dearborn Development.

Duke Energy says the license issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission provides enhancements to water quality, quantity, recreation, land conservations as well as fish and wildlife habitat protection.

In the quiet town of Great falls – lies the potential for many outdoor adventures.

Tim Huffman, Senior Project manager with Duke Energy is seeing those potential attractions come to life through Duke Energy’s Great Falls- Dearborn Diversion Project on the Catawba River.

“There is two hydro dams built down on this end Great Falls Reservoir -Great Falls was the original one in 1906 then in the early 20’s they built Dearborn when demand for electricity had increased in the area due to the textile manufacturing”, says Huffman.

Now more than 100 Years later through a license issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission Duke Energy is working to put water back into the channels of the river to bring recreation like white water rapids, kayaking and canoeing to life.

“This will be a Class 4 Whitewater resource which is for experts”, says Huffman.

Huffman took us on a tour of the construction in progress at the Short Bypass Reach. Huffman says controlled gates will be installed to make the releases in the channels.

About a mile and a half upstream is the Long Bypass Reach where tourist can make the choice to try Class 2 and 3 rapids. Water enthusiasts will be able to access the bypass channels at the Nitrolee Access Area.

At the Nitrolee Access Area there will be restrooms and parking. There will also be a historic interpretive center about the remains of the original Arc building that was part of the Nitrolee plant in the early 1900’s.

There’s more. Duke Energy will also provide funding to the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism to develop a state park on Dearborn Island.

A pedestrian bridge will also be built to the island from the Great Falls canoe and kayak launch. As well as trails on the island and along the bridge.

Duke Energy leaders say this site will be connected to the lower Great Falls sites by the Carolina Thread Trail.

Chester County Councilman for District 2, Mike Vaughn says in 15 Years those who come to his town will not recognize it.

The old Belk historic building on Dearborn Street is set to be a visitor center.

Vaughn says some buildings have been sold and plans are in the works to bring businesses to the area through the final product on the river.

“Great Falls is unique and the more people discover that and tell other people, I see a great change coming here”, Vaughn says.

“Long before me, people were working in Great Falls. People like Dr. Speedy Starnes who was the mayor here and my mother who was on the board of the hometown association. They started this work 20 – 25 years ago and talking about nature – based tourism, how important it is to Great Falls. All of that work is coming to fruition and now. Its tremendously exciting”, says Vaughn.

Vaughn adds he and others in the community are working hard to make sure Great Falls is in a good position for what’s coming.

Duke Energy leader say the project is approximately $70 Million Dollars.

The projects are currently planned to be completed within the next two years.

More Info: https://s2odesign.com/duke-partnering-with-sc-to-develop-massive-new-whitewater-center-for-charlotte-region/

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