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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Hanahan, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Hanahan:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Hanahan, SC

How Ancestry’s CEO spent her first 90 days on the job: ‘This is when people are going to judge you, when they’re going to assess you’

Sign up for the Fortune Features email list so you don’t miss our biggest features, exclusive interviews, and investigations.A common mistake made by CEOs wanting to show investors early on that they’re action-oriented is to enter an organization with guns blazing ready to restructure its operations. But as a first...

Sign up for the Fortune Features email list so you don’t miss our biggest features, exclusive interviews, and investigations.

A common mistake made by CEOs wanting to show investors early on that they’re action-oriented is to enter an organization with guns blazing ready to restructure its operations. But as a first-time CEO and new to Ancestry.com, Deborah Liu wanted to make sure she had the lay of the land in her first 90 days, before starting her efforts to transform the family history tracking site in earnest.

When she joined Ancestry in 2021, Liu was coming off a decade at companies like Facebook parent Meta, where she most recently spearheaded its marketplace group. While both companies share some similarities, given their positioning in the tech industry, Ancestry’s success is partly predicated on assuaging any fear from customers, who must entrust their DNA with the company. So she embarked on a listening tour, setting up meetings with about 60 Ancestry employees up and down the corporate hierarchy. Each employee was asked a series of fundamental questions: What is working? What isn’t working? What would you do if you were CEO? “There are a lot of reasons why things are done the way they’re done. And making changes without understanding the reasons why actually risks breaking things,” says Liu.

In 2020, Blackstone took Ancestry private for $4.7 billion and tasked Liu with growing paid subscribers beyond their current standing of 3.9 million—a mission that requires an expansion abroad and outreach to far more customers of color. Understanding Ancestry’s strengths and the gaps that needed addressing were key to mapping out a new strategy and her leadership priority: “How do we build a product that’s more appealing to people outside of our core demographic, which today is primarily people of Western European origin?” she asks.

Here, her experience as the daughter of Chinese immigrants living in the Deep South proves helpful. At age 6, Liu and her family moved from New York City to Hanahan, S.C. But she faced discrimination and was othered for her ethnic features and school lunches. That ostracism sparked an intense desire to succeed so she could get out of the South, and also made her combative early in her career.

Now 46 and with a number of high-powered jobs behind her at marquee companies like PayPal and eBay, Liu admits that she has mellowed as she’s matured, encouraged to do so by her mentor, outgoing Meta operations chief Sheryl Sandberg. “It took me a long time to internalize that the fight that got me to where I was successful also was holding me back,” says Liu. And that newer, gentler approach has made her the kind of CEO who listens to her troops before taking them into battle.

This article has been edited and condensed for clarity.Fortune: Blackstone bought Ancestry.com three months before hiring you. What are your marching orders for building the company and growing sales?

Deborah Liu: Ancestry.com is a 35-year-old company, and so carrying the mission for another 35 years requires us to invest in the evolution of our product, not just the product we have today. How do we appeal to more people? How do we build a product that’s more appealing to people outside of our core demographic, which today is primarily people of Western European origin? We have amazing records, and we can magically help you trace your lineage all the way back to royalty in many countries in Europe. But we don’t have the same content for certain groups from Asia or from Latin America. That’s some of the work we need to do over the next five years.

With the surge in violence by white supremacist groups and a broader distrust of tech companies, some people fear the prospect of companies owning a large database of people’s DNA and ethnic origins. Is that unfounded?

Privacy is really important to Ancestry and other key companies in our industry. We work really hard to be good stewards of the data that people give us. For example, you can make a family tree public or private; you can opt out of DNA matches; you can actually delete your data. We do not share customer information with law enforcement unless there’s some really extensive legal process such as a court order or search warrant.

In such a multicultural society, why are people so interested in their origins?

I think as people are more interconnected, they understand they are part of the human family. Think about the resilience it takes to go to another country when you know you can never go back across the ocean. You probably have so much more rich history than you could ever imagine.

What about you? What is your ancestry?

I am Cantonese, Southern Chinese from Guangzhou. My parents come from two villages that are pretty close, so they could have known each other growing up, but they met in New York. Their families lived in Vietnam for a period. The world is much smaller and bigger than you ever imagined. Think about the coincidence of two people meeting in that way.

Your former Facebook colleague Sheryl Sandberg once told you after you’d achieved some professional success that “you can stop fighting now. You’ve won.” What did she mean, and how has that informed your management style?I struggled a long time with living in a place that reminded us every day we were very different. I grew up in a small town in the Deep South looking the way I do. I was different than everybody else. I just had so much fight in me. I was fighting to get into a college with a scholarship so I never had to go back. At work, I had a very combative style, and that serves you until it no longer serves you. What she was saying was, “You don’t have to fight anymore. You’re actually part of the team as opposed to kind of being the outsider.”

It took me a long time to internalize that the fight that got me to where I was successful also was holding me back. I had to really change my style because so much about me was using the chip on my shoulder as a stepping-stone.

In one of your Substack posts, you urged people to make the most of their first 90 days in a job, including CEO. How did you do this after joining in March 2021?

Starting off well in a 90-day period is really important. This is when people are going to judge you, when they’re going to assess you, when they’re going to try to understand you. Everyone has a wait-and-see attitude when you first come in. Everyone is sort of feeling you out. And that is the time when you’re really establishing who you are, your vision, your values. At the same time, they want to know that you’re a good listener, that you’re curious. There’s a lot of rich history here. And there’s a lot of reasons why things are done the way they’re done. And making changes without understanding the reasons why actually risks breaking things.

So I did a 30-day listening tour, asking people the same five questions. (What is working well? What is not working? What should we do that we aren’t doing today? What would you do if you were in my shoes? What should I learn about Ancestry that will be helpful to me in my role?) I talked to over 60 people. During that time I absorbed culture, the company, and then at the end, I wrote a summary and shared it with the company.

One of the main criticisms tossed at DNA-testing companies is that the uptake among consumers of color is low, meaning we have an incomplete picture of the world’s ethnic background and by extension health history. How can that be addressed?

Because of slavery and immigration, a lot of people have lost touch with where their family came from. Luckily, your origins are encoded in your DNA, and we can connect you back. Everyone who came through the ports in America during slavery lost touch with a lot of the written history, the oral history of their families. Part of the work we have to do is help people trace back to the 1860s with the Freedmen’s Bureau [an entity created in 1865 for the supervision and management of all matters relating to the refugees and freedmen and lands abandoned or seized during the Civil War]. We digitized the resources at the bureau because they were at-risk collections, and then made that available for free.

Get to know Liu:

Hanahan creates master plan, looks to revitalize town center with new businesses

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — Hanahan wants to expand.The city of Hanahan has developed a master plan to revitalize its town center and bring more businesses to the area.Kristen O'Neill is a part owner of Theory Collective in Hanahan. The hair salon opened about a year ago."Our team is growing...

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — Hanahan wants to expand.

The city of Hanahan has developed a master plan to revitalize its town center and bring more businesses to the area.

Kristen O'Neill is a part owner of Theory Collective in Hanahan. The hair salon opened about a year ago.

"Our team is growing. It's great. We offer more services and see more clients," said O'Neill.

O’Neill said she is happy the city is working to bring in more businesses. She thinks more storefronts could mean more traffic at the salon.

"I think it would be great, I mean, especially on Yeamans Hall Road, there is not a whole lot. There's gas stations. It would be great to get a bite to eat up the road," said O'Neill.

She thinks it would be great to work with new businesses.

"We love partnering with local businesses. We have done it in the past and we will do it in the future. However we can support local businesses, we will," said O'Neill.

Mayor Christie Rainwater says there are things that are missing from the city.

"The truth is, we are missing quality businesses, restaurants, boutiques. That’s something people want to see come in. They don’t want to have to go to North Charleston or a neighboring city to go to the doctor," said Mayor Rainwater.

She wants to know what residents see for the future of the town center.

The plan is something they can use to present to those who are interested in coming to the area.

"It really gives us resources that we need to present to people who would like to bring their development or business to Hanahan, and say this is where it may fit best," said the mayor.

The city wants to continue hearing from residents. They have a survey on their website at cityofhanahan.com.

"If you have a dream inside of you and you want to bring it to the downtown of Hanahan, we would love to work with you to do that," said Rainwater.

Residents are frustrated as trains continue to block roads in Hanahan

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCBD) – Hanahan residents are still frustrated over trains that continue to block area roadways for hours at a time.One train was seen blocking Hanahan Road for hours Wednesday morning, and before that, Hanahan town administrator Mike Cochran told News 2 a train sat blocking roads for more than 20 hours straight recently.The road the trains are blocking is a major thor...

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCBD) – Hanahan residents are still frustrated over trains that continue to block area roadways for hours at a time.

One train was seen blocking Hanahan Road for hours Wednesday morning, and before that, Hanahan town administrator Mike Cochran told News 2 a train sat blocking roads for more than 20 hours straight recently.

The road the trains are blocking is a major thoroughfare for people driving to and from Rivers Avenue and Hanahan.

“We’ve got about 7,000 cars a day that cross the tracks right here, and in the last several months, we’ve had multiple instances where the tracks just get blocked by a parked train,” said Cochran.

Drivers are forced to add additional time to their commute; it also slows emergency responses.

“From the city’s perspective, if you’re trying to get an ambulance through the city, you’re crossing here in order to get over to the hospitals,” he explained.

Technically, blocking the road is illegal according to more-than-100-year-old state laws. But the fine is only $5 to $20, and it is difficult to enforce.

“We have contacted CSX and spoke with them on several occasions, and they’re aware of it, but it really is frustrating for our residents and frustrating for everybody involved,” said Cochran. “Last week, it sat there for over 30 hours.”

Cochran said he has a plan that may give residents a way to know when a train is stopped in the area. The county owns the library at the corner of Murray Drive and Highland Park Road. He’s asked about placing a camera there.

“I said is there a way that we could put a camera, or the county put a camera, on the library? If they were to put a camera on that library and point it toward the tracks, we would have a constant feed of exactly what the status of the tracks are.”

The video would also be streamed online.

“We’ll have that ability to push that information out, so while it’s not a perfect solution, it will at least allow an option because right now the only way you know if the tracks are blocked it’s the drive to them.”

News 2 reached out to CSX to see if they have any plans to change their policy of blocking trains for hours at a time. We are waiting to hear back.

Lowcountry high school baseball teams reach division finals in Hanahan Invitational Tournament

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Four Lowcountry high school baseball teams punched their tickets to division championship games in the Hanahan Invitational Tournament on Wednesday.In the Steadman Division Championship game, James Island will face Ashley Ridge. That game is set for 5 p.m. on Thursday at Hanahan High School.In the Hatfield Division Championship game, Summerville will face Wando. That matchup is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, also at Hanahan High School.WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13TH, 2022 Scores:ST...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Four Lowcountry high school baseball teams punched their tickets to division championship games in the Hanahan Invitational Tournament on Wednesday.

In the Steadman Division Championship game, James Island will face Ashley Ridge. That game is set for 5 p.m. on Thursday at Hanahan High School.

In the Hatfield Division Championship game, Summerville will face Wando. That matchup is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, also at Hanahan High School.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13TH, 2022 Scores:

STEADMAN DIVISION

SITE: HANAHAN HIGH SCHOOL

GAME 37: 5:00 OCEAN LAKES, VA 1 VS. PROVIDENCE, NC 3

GAME 38: 7:30 HANAHAN, SC 2 VS. HICKORY GROVE, NC 1

SITE:

JAMES ISLAND CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL

GAME 39: 5:00 LUCY BECKHAM, SC 17 VS. OLYMPIC, NC 7

GAME 40: 7:30 OCEANSIDE COLLEGIATE, SC 0 VS. JAMES ISLAND, SC 10 SEMIFINAL

SITE:

GOOSE CREEK HIGH SCHOOL (SEDGEFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL)

GAME 42: 5:00 STRATFORD, SC 12 VS. PINEWOOD PREP, SC 13

GAME 43: 7:30 GOOSE CREEK, SC 4 VS. TIMBERLAND, SC 1

SITE:

ASHLEY RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL

GAME 44: 5:00 WOODLAND, SC 2 VS. REAGAN, NC 14

GAME 45: 7:30 ASHLEY RIDGE, SC 10 VS. ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE, DC 6 – SEMIFINAL

HATFIELD DIVISION

SITE:

SUMMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL (GREGG MIDDLE SCHOOL)

GAME 46: 5:00 HICKORY, VA 0 VS. ARDREY KELL, NC 10

GAME 47: 7:30 CATAWBA RIDGE, SC 2 VS SUMMERVILLE, SC 9 SEMIFINAL

SITE:

WEST ASHLEY HIGH SCHOOL

GAME 48: 5:00 FORT DORCHESTER, SC 7 VS. HILTON HEAD, SC 2

GAME 49: 7:30 WEST ASHLEY, SC 6 VS. NANSEMOND RIVER, VA 7 9 INNINGS

SITE:

BISHOP ENGLAND HIGH SCHOOL

GAME 50: 5:00 BEAUFORT, SC 4 VS. RANDLEMAN, NC 7

GAME 51: 7:30 BISHOP ENGLAND, SC 6 VS. MAMARONECK, NY 3

SITE:

WANDO HIGH SCHOOL

GAME 52: 5:00 PHILIP SIMMONS, SC 5 VS. BAMBERG EHRHARDT, SC 4

GAME 53: 7:30 WANDO, SC 12 VS. ST. EDWARDS, OH 10 SEMIFINAL

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

High turnout rates during first year of early voting in South Carolina

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Just six days before the primary election day, Charleston and Berkeley County have some of the highest turnout numbers in the state during the first year of early voting.In both counties, people were flooding in and out casting their votes by the minute. Hanahan Library is one of three polling locations in Berkeley County that’s seeing a steady increase in voters day by day.“Berkeley County is getting good percentage coming out early,” Doreen Thompson, one of the polling managers at H...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Just six days before the primary election day, Charleston and Berkeley County have some of the highest turnout numbers in the state during the first year of early voting.

In both counties, people were flooding in and out casting their votes by the minute. Hanahan Library is one of three polling locations in Berkeley County that’s seeing a steady increase in voters day by day.

“Berkeley County is getting good percentage coming out early,” Doreen Thompson, one of the polling managers at Hanahan Library, said. “I can’t say overall how the percentage is, but for this area that we’re working right now, we’re getting fairly well.”

Records show that around 3 million people were registered to vote in 2020, but only about 22% of those people voted.

Isaac Cramer, the director of the Charleston County Board of Elections, is one of the main people in charge of making this happen.

“With our equipment and our poll managers and our training and our recruitment, we’re expecting a high turnout,” Cramer said. “Reality will probably be about that 20% number, but we are expecting a high turnout if that happens, so voters don’t have a long wait as they head into the polls.”

As of now, Charleston County has the fourth-highest number of early voters in the state. In 2018, only 1,700 people cast their votes in the first 30 days using in-person absentee voting. This year, the numbers have doubled to 3,600 in the first six days using early voting.

“Our intent with every election is to find access for every voter,” Cramer said. “So, Charleston, we’ve always led the state in ballots casts ahead of election day. We were actually the model for this legislation with the off-site early voting locations, but with the tight window of time between legislation passing and early voting starting, we weren’t able to expand to multiple locations across the county. But in November, we will have seven locations for early voting. So, we do anticipate this county to lead the state in early voting as we have had in the past.”

Cramer says that if you have not voted already, please visit scvotes.gov to find your polling location. He says he wants you to be best prepared on June 14.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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