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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Heat Springs, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Heat Springs:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Heat Springs, SC

NMSU students produce documentaries as part of Gila Film School

New Mexico State UniversityLAS CRUCES - Thirteen student filmmakers from New Mexico State University headed into the Gila National Forest July 18 with plans to make six short documentary films about the Gila Wilderness. The 12-day trip is the first of a two-part course in environmental filmmaking envisioned by Ilana Lapid, associate professor in NMSU's Creative Media Institute and her team."Last summer, I led my first backpacking trip, to Jordan Hot Springs," Lapid said. "It was really a transforma...

New Mexico State University

LAS CRUCES - Thirteen student filmmakers from New Mexico State University headed into the Gila National Forest July 18 with plans to make six short documentary films about the Gila Wilderness. The 12-day trip is the first of a two-part course in environmental filmmaking envisioned by Ilana Lapid, associate professor in NMSU's Creative Media Institute and her team.

"Last summer, I led my first backpacking trip, to Jordan Hot Springs," Lapid said. "It was really a transformational journey. It's a place of exceptional beauty and connecting to wilderness was very healing for me and I came out of that experience with this strong desire to bring my film students to the Gila so that they could have a similar experience, and tell stories of conservation.”

Thanks to a grant from the U.S. Forest Service, support from American Rivers, the College of Arts and Sciences, NMSU's Vice President for Research and the Creative Media Institute, the Gila Film School will spend 12 days in the Gila National Forest interviewing forest firefighters, wildlife biologists, US Forest Service wranglers, trail users, archeologists, community leaders and elders and nonprofit organizers to make their documentaries.

Through a partnership with the U.S. Forest Service, the documentary films will be used as part of the 100-year celebration of the Gila Wilderness, the world’s first designated Wilderness Area. The films and teaching materials also will be sent to fourth-grade classes across New Mexico.

In preparation for the film school, Kenny Coppedge, NMSU's outdoor recreation program manager, held three clinics to teach the film students the basics of backpacking in the wilderness.

Each team will have satellite messenger devices so that when they're in areas without mobile phone reception, they can communicate with professors.

Jackson Markman, Nidia Jimenez and Samantha Jaso’s short film is focused on the community's fight to protect the Gila River as Wild and Scenic. They are documenting a “multi-generational conservation effort and political movement in 15 minutes, all the while telling an interesting and engaging story," Markman said. "I’ll be filming youth activists and the previous generation of conservation leaders. It's all about the fight to designate the Gila River as Wild and Scenic."

The film by Gayla Lacy (from Silver City) and Noah Montes will highlight the history of the protection of the Gila Cliff Dwellings, including the story of Dawson "Doc" Campbell and his family.

"We're retelling the history of the Gila through the lens of really passionate locals who are making their mark right now," Montes said.

Lexi Minton and Cherish Peña will focus on the transformational experience of the wilderness for hikers and backpackers. Patricia Soto and Angel Salgado will highlight the Gila trout and restoration efforts in recently burned areas.

Ezekiel Soliz and Ingrid Leyva's short film is about the Indigenous history of the Gila and native relationships with the land.

"It’s an important topic, said Soliz, who is from Silver City. "It's such a sensitive conversation … I wanted to take on that topic and really challenge myself and dig deeper because I am from the Gila. I consider the Gila my home."

Bardo Sanchez and Julia De La O's film will focus on wildland firefighting in the Gila.

“It's quite challenging capturing the history and the changing methods and all of the different contributing factors of growing wildfires,” Sanchez said. “When we first started discussing the project, the Black Fire had just begun. There are a lot of stories to tell with wildland firefighting."

Kristi Drexler, who has a doctorate from NMSU, teamed up with Lapid to create the Gila Film School program. Drexler is providing guest lectures on conservation, coordinating program logistics, and “helping to strategize how to use the student films for educational, conservation, and social impact," Drexler said.

Drexler will be advising student filmmakers along with Lapid and CMI alumnus Julian Alexander. Alexander is a lecturer teaching filmmaking and pursuing a doctorate at the University of East London.

"I learned how to be a filmmaker and a teacher here at NMSU so it's a very special place to me," Alexander said. "Mentoring CMI students and helping and supporting them through this opportunity in the Gila Film School is really exciting. We're going to be visiting each filmmaking team so that all three of us at some point will be in the vicinity of each team. I had a similar experience in Belize (co-taught by Lapid and Drexler) and it was very transformative, so to be able to support students in the same way here is really special."

CMI alumni Dominic Vincent and Araceli Hernandez are creating a behind-the-scenes documentary, following the teams as they shoot their films. CMI alum Kyle Ivy is the program coordinator of the Gila Film School while Simon Sotelo of Silver City is a field producer.

"I think the project that Ilana and her team are leading with this group of students is a wonderful 'Creative Campus' endeavor because this experience demonstrates the power of media and how creative content creation lies at the intersection of so many different areas," said Amy Lanasa, CMI professor and department head. "I'm so proud of everything Ilana and Kristi have accomplished to get to this point, and so excited for the journey that these lucky 13 students are going to get to take. I am confident that this work will have a greater impact than any of us can imagine."

The Gila Film School is a proof-of-concept project to springboard a broader vision that Lapid and Drexler have for the proposed Southern New Mexico Environmental Media Center. They have submitted a grant proposal that would fund its first two years at NMSU. The SoNM EMC would create an interdisciplinary space for collaborations between scientists and researchers working on climate and sustainability with visual storytellers who can amplify the impact of their work across various media platforms.

“The vision for the Southern New Mexico Environmental Media Center is to train the next generation of diverse environmental content creators to use visual storytelling for conservation, climate resilience and social impact,” Lapid said. “Climate change is a concern that they will inherit. Stories and narratives in media can be a powerful way to change minds and shift behaviors. And if these students have the ability to create impactful media, they can really shape the future reality of their generation."

Minerva Baumann writes for New Mexico State University Marketing and Communications and can be reached at 575-76-646-7566, mbauma46@nmsu.edu.

Extreme weather is tormenting every U.S. region, and it’s far from over

Nearly every corner of the Lower 48 is dealing with some sort of wild weather, with fires, floods, tornadoes and a punishing heat wave all wreaking havoc.A staggering 120 million Americans are covered by alerts for extreme heat Tuesday, while half a million customers in the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley remain in the dark after violent thunderstorms knocked out power Monday night.Record heat swelled from Nebraska to South Carolina. Chicago dealt with hurricane-...

Nearly every corner of the Lower 48 is dealing with some sort of wild weather, with fires, floods, tornadoes and a punishing heat wave all wreaking havoc.

A staggering 120 million Americans are covered by alerts for extreme heat Tuesday, while half a million customers in the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley remain in the dark after violent thunderstorms knocked out power Monday night.

Record heat swelled from Nebraska to South Carolina. Chicago dealt with hurricane-force winds and probable tornadoes. Yellowstone National Park was blocked off to visitors because of roads made impassible by flooding. Fires raged in the Desert Southwest.

The seemingly disjointed atmospheric turmoil is all tied together in what meteorologists refer to as a “ring of fire” weather pattern. A stifling heat dome is parked over the Tennessee Valley, bringing exceptional heat and humidity while severe thunderstorms erupt along its northern fringe. In the dome’s wake, dry air has parched the Southwestern landscape, creating tinderbox conditions for fast-spreading fires. A dip in the jet stream on the heat dome’s northwest flank has allowed exceptional amounts of moisture to pour over the Northern Rockies.

The active weather pattern, with heat acting as the centerpiece, is slated to stick around for the next week or two. The heat, intensified by human-caused climate change, could well fuel more destructive storms.

The National Weather Service received nearly 600 reports of severe weather Monday as violent thunderstorms erupted in the Midwest and charged southeastward through the Ohio Valley into southwest Virginia and western North Carolina. The storms unleashed winds up to 98 mph, downing hundreds of trees.

Forming on the northern periphery of the heat dome and energized by south-to-north temperature contrasts, the storms drew down roaring high-altitude winds as destructive gusts.

On Monday evening, the storms began along Interstate 94 between Madison and Milwaukee, dropping hen-egg-size hail before shifting over Lake Michigan.

The thunderstorm grew to nearly 70,000 feet tall, feeling the effects of the jet stream aloft, which contributed to its potency. Prolific lightning rates, with more than a dozen flashes per second, accompanied the developing storm cell.

Another severe storm blossomed west of Chicago, becoming a supercell or rotating thunderstorm that prompted the issuance of tornado warnings across the area. Sirens blared as the storms approached. There was radar evidence of tight circulations near Streamwood, Roselle and Maywood, Ill., and an 84 mph wind gust was reported at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.

Some damage was reported, including the entire roof of a third-floor apartment removed in Maywood, in addition to a partial wall collapse on North Fremont Street in Chicago. The Weather Service confirmed one weak tornado touched down in Rosselle but that most of the damage in area was from straight-line winds.

Farther east, storms consolidated into multiple bow echoes, or curved squall lines containing strong winds. The most severe blasted through northeast Indiana, extreme southern Michigan and the majority of Ohio. Winds gusted to 98 mph at the airport in Fort Wayne, Ind., and 75 mph in Putnam County, Ohio. The Weather Service determined the squall line met the criteria of a derecho which is a violent, extensive, fast-moving storm complex.

Additional bouts of strong to severe storms are probable in the Midwest and Ohio Valley Wednesday and Thursday — again firing along the heat dome’s northern fringe.

The heat dome is centered near Nashville. It has established dozens of high temperature records since it first formed late last week over Texas and the Southwest. Temperatures soared to as high as 123 degrees in Death Valley, Calif., while Phoenix hit 114 and Las Vegas 109 over the weekend. Austin and San Antonio made it to 105.

Now widespread readings in the upper 90s to near 100 are shifting east. Stifling humidity is making these air temperatures feel 10 to 15 degrees higher.

Lincoln, Neb. (with a high of 103 degrees), Columbia, S.C. (103), Austin (102), St. Louis (100), Charlotte (98), Nashville (97), and Louisville and Paducah, Ky. (both 97) set June 13 records Monday. North Platte, Neb., hit 108 degrees — not just a daily record, but the highest temperature ever recorded there during the month of June.

Records highs could be challenged from Minneapolis to Charleston, S.C., on Tuesday. Excessive heat warnings cover much of the Midwest where suffocating humidity levels, enhanced by moisture from corn and other crops, could cause heat index values to top 110 degrees in spots.

“Widespread heat indices of 100+ degrees are dangerous for those working or playing outdoors for long periods,” the National Weather Service tweeted Tuesday.

While Chicago cleans up from Monday night’s storms, it faces “dangerous heat and humidity” Tuesday and Wednesday, the National Weather Service tweeted. The Windy City could feel as hot as 110 degrees.

The Weather Service is forecasting a 99-degree high in Minneapolis on Tuesday, which would claim a record, beating out the 98 reading tabulated in 1987. Nashville, Columbia, S.C., and St. Louis are forecast to set record highs for a second straight day.

A new insurgence of heat will return to the Plains by the weekend. The Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center continues to predict above-average temperatures over the center of the country through next week.

Current conditions of Yellowstone’s North Entrance Road through the Gardner Canyon between Gardiner, Montana, and Mammoth Hot Springs.We will continue to communicate about this hazardous situation as more information is available. More info: https://t.co/mymnqGvcVB pic.twitter.com/S5ysi4wf8a

— Yellowstone National Park (@YellowstoneNPS) June 13, 2022

Unusually wet weather has flanked the heat dome in the Pacific Northwest, where the jet stream took a dip late last week. This allowed an unusually strong plume of moisture for the time of year — known as an atmospheric river — to surge inland from the Pacific Ocean. It spread exceptional June rainfall not only in Washington and Oregon but also into the Northern Rockies.

Heavy rain and melting snow have combined to produce historic flooding around Yellowstone National Park. Two to three inches of rain was reported at several gauges between Saturday and Monday.

A roaring river washed away the road to Yellowstone National Park’s north entrance in Gardner Canyon, between Gardiner, Mont., and Mammoth Hot Springs.

“Effective immediately, there will be no inbound visitor traffic at any of the five entrances into Yellowstone National Park on Tuesday, June 14, and Wednesday, June 15, at a minimum,” read the Park’s website. The park cited “extremely hazardous conditions” including “heavy flooding [and] rockslides.”

At least one home was captured on video collapsing into a river in southern Montana as the ground on which it sat was eroded.

Meanwhile, the combination of gusty winds, low humidity and drought — intensified by recent record-breaking temperatures — has spurred dangerous fire conditions in the Southwest.

New fires have broken out in California and Arizona since the weekend, including north of Flagstaff, Ariz., where the Pipeline Fire has torched 5,000 acres. The Associated Press reported that the Arizona Snowbowl ski resort was closed and hundreds of homes evacuated in response to the fire, which is the second to affect the area this year.

Views from the O'Leary Webcam at 360 Overwatch tonight at 8:28 p.m. give us an idea of just how far this fire has spread... from the peak to the valley below. The views we're accustomed to will be black come morning. This is why we obey burn bans! #PipelineFire #azwx pic.twitter.com/YRhcKbajpM

— NWS Flagstaff (@NWSFlagstaff) June 14, 2022

In New Mexico, the state’s largest wildfire on record continues to rage east of Santa Fe. The Hermits Peak and Calf Canyon fire complex, has charred a whopping 325,340 acres — twelve times the size of Disney World — and is 70 percent contained. Simultaneously, the Black Fire, New Mexico’s second largest on record, also rages.

The Calf Canyon Fire is getting bigger… here is video from one of our Substack subscribers taken in Mora New Mexico. Very strong winds present and red flag warnings are in effect. Even at 60+% contained, it’s still a monster. #CalfCanyonFire #HermitsPeakFire #wildfire #nmwx pic.twitter.com/StdTPEnOOM

— TheHotshotWakeUp (@HotshotWake) June 14, 2022

President Biden (D) visited New Mexico on Saturday to meet with state and local officials and address ongoing wildfire fighting efforts.

Red flag warnings were in effect Tuesday for much of northern New Mexico and southwest Colorado due to high fire danger.

Spring 2022: What does the forecast look like for the Carolinas?

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Even though we finally saw some snow and ice this winter we still are going to end up with above-average temperatures and below-average rainfall. Those trends were primarily a result of the La Nina pattern in the Pacific. All signs point to La Nina lasting through the spring before it wanes. So what will this mean for our spring weather? Let us take a look.It's hard to find any reason we are going to see a colder pattern for the spring season. Now, this doesn't mean we won't have cold snaps, especially in March...

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Even though we finally saw some snow and ice this winter we still are going to end up with above-average temperatures and below-average rainfall. Those trends were primarily a result of the La Nina pattern in the Pacific. All signs point to La Nina lasting through the spring before it wanes. So what will this mean for our spring weather? Let us take a look.

It's hard to find any reason we are going to see a colder pattern for the spring season. Now, this doesn't mean we won't have cold snaps, especially in March. It just means as the whole spring, March to May, will be warmer than the 30-year average of 1991-2020.

That warm and drier pattern will be driven primarily by the La Nina, which is still present in the equatorial Pacific ocean. This keeps the jetstream just to our north and allows for warmer air and more ridging over the southeastern U.S. So expect to see warmer temperatures and less rainfall. Just don't expect a drought, we should see something closer to average and enough to keep us from being in drought much longer.

Spring Forecast

One thing about La Nina we know is that the risk for more severe storms is likely in the La Nina-influenced spring seasons. When you couple this with warmer-than-average water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico which fuels more frequent severe storms in the South. Some of the largest severe weather outbreaks have occurred in the La Nina spring seasons in the past. So for this reason I expect a very active severe weather season this spring.

One of the downsides of warmer and drier weather is a long and more pronounced spring allergy season. Though that's to the cooler weather in January the leaf index is actually behind schedule for the middle of February.

This might not last long with a quick warm-up in March we usually see the pollen season take off. You then couple that with a warm and dry spring season and see fewer chances to wash out the pollen when it starts to peak in April.

For the first time in since about 2016 the spring leaf index is slightly behind schedule thanks to a more typical January. Look at last year versus this year for Spring Leaf development throuhg Feb 15th. #cltwx #ncwx #scwx #wcnc pic.twitter.com/3XqJ1KBoQX

— Brad Panovich (@wxbrad) February 15, 2022

Preparing for Spring severe weather season in South Carolina

Spring kicks off the severe weather season for South Carolina. Officials say it is important to be informed and prepare for when strong weather moves in.COLUMBIA, S.C. — With multiple chances of severe weather this week, it is the perfect time to talk about severe weather safety. This week also happens to be South Carolina's severe weather awareness week which aims to spread information about severe weather.The last time we saw tornadoes here in the Midlands was in August from the remnants of Tropical Storm Fred so, it ha...

Spring kicks off the severe weather season for South Carolina. Officials say it is important to be informed and prepare for when strong weather moves in.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — With multiple chances of severe weather this week, it is the perfect time to talk about severe weather safety. This week also happens to be South Carolina's severe weather awareness week which aims to spread information about severe weather.

The last time we saw tornadoes here in the Midlands was in August from the remnants of Tropical Storm Fred so, it has been a while since we have seen this sort of weather.

Going into the Spring, we see our historically most active time for tornadoes across the Midlands. As for damaging winds and flooding, those typically are more associated with summertime storms although strong winds are always possible through the entire year.

When it comes to this inclement weather it is important to know how we talk about these storms. When you hear a watch has been issued this is leading up to potential bad weather, conditions are favorable at this point and it is important to keep up to date with the forecast during this time.

When a warning is issued that means that damaging and potentially life-threatening weather is about to or is already occurring. This is when you should take measures to keep yourself safe.

If strong winds or a tornado are heading your way it is important to seek shelter somewhere in an interior room on the ground floor of a sturdy structure.

As rain falls in these storms flash flooding can also pose a life-threatening situation, in many cases though the danger can be avoided according to Cpt. Winta Adams with Richland Emergency Services.

“That phrase turn around don’t drown, that’s perfect. Make sure you don’t drive through flood waters, don’t try to swim through it or walk through it… and if you are advised to evacuate make sure to evacuate the area.”

Along with staying informed, having a disaster kit will help especially when stronger weather hits.

“That’s going to include flashlights, battery operated radios, spare clothing and prescription medication, first aid kits.”

For more information on things to include in your disaster kit you can visit: https://www.ready.gov/sites/default/files/2021-02/ready_checklist.pdf

WATCH: Hot Springs native has strong first day on Lake Hamilton

After finishing the first day of the Phoenix Bass Fishing League All-American tournament in the top 10, Hot Springs' Brian Bean feels good about his chances of making it to Saturday's final round on his home lake.Bean set a solid mark of 11 pounds, 13 ounces as the first angler to weigh in at Andrew H. Hulsey Fish Hatchery Thursday afternoon. He said that while the weather was not ideal, he had a decent day on the lake."It was kind of tough, but I thought it would be a little better," he said. "Just the quality w...

After finishing the first day of the Phoenix Bass Fishing League All-American tournament in the top 10, Hot Springs' Brian Bean feels good about his chances of making it to Saturday's final round on his home lake.

Bean set a solid mark of 11 pounds, 13 ounces as the first angler to weigh in at Andrew H. Hulsey Fish Hatchery Thursday afternoon. He said that while the weather was not ideal, he had a decent day on the lake.

"It was kind of tough, but I thought it would be a little better," he said. "Just the quality wasn't there, you know. I caught a lot of keepers, just only caught one decent one and my co-angler throwed in there behind me and caught a decent one. And I lost a big one, but, you know, that seems to be the -- everybody loses his big ones."

Video not playing? Click here https://www.youtube.com/embed/K64bW2q3aok

Bean said that he caught his limit early in the day, landing his first bass just minutes after his inital stop.

"I caught the limit, probably -- oh, I guess after my second stop I think," he said. "Well, like I say, you know, there was nothing special, just typical 12, 14 inchers."

Bean finished the first day in fifth place after Connor Cunningham, of Springfield, Missouri, reeled in a massive bag at 17 lbs. 8 oz. Bean trails the leader by 5 lbs. 11 oz., but he is not overly concerned.

"It could have ... just as well been me as anyone else, you know," he said. "It's just, that's Lake Hamilton, but tomorrow, you can catch six pounds, you know, six, seven pounds. And then the next day, you can catch another, you know, six, seven. It can, it will humble you more than, more than most places. It is very unpredictable, and, you know, the water changes and them running water and pulling water and just everything changes there."

Although he "swung for the fences" on the first day, Bean is going to take it a little easier for the second round.

"It's gonna be tough (today)," he said. "I know it is. I could catch, you know, five or six pounds (today). ... I swung for the fences today. I really thought I could catch 15 pounds, and, you know, I had the opportunity to but I didn't. But I'm gonna kind of play it safe (today) and just hope and pray that I can catch 11, 10 1/2. I think 10 1/2, 11 1/2 pounds will be OK."

Bean said that while it was great to fish so close to home, he started to remember some of his past tournaments on the lake.

"It was awesome," he said. "Other than, you know, I get hung up fishing history, just like anybody else would. I've won a lot, a lot of tournaments over there, and it's hard to drive by those places."

Kevin Brown, the other Hot Springs angler in the competition, finished 14th on the day with a five-bass limit of 10 lbs. 2 oz. Drew Tabor, of Harrison, was 13th with a bag of 10 lbs. 3 oz., while Taylor Johnson, of Texarkana, landed four bass for a bag of 5 lbs. 13 oz. to finish 48th.

A total of 45 of the 49 anglers in the boater division landed the tournament limit.

Billy Rusher, of Lincoln, took the lead after the first day in the Strike King co-angler division with a bag of 11 lbs. 4 oz. with the tournament limit. Evan Eldred, of Gaines, Michigan, was second at 9 lbs. 15 oz., and Hunter Dahnke, of Missoula, Montana, finished third at 9 lbs.

Cory Guinn, of Mountain Rest, South Carolina, was fourth with 8 lbs. 14 oz., and Kenneth Hunnicutt, of Jacksonville, Florida, rounded out the top five with a bag of 7 lbs. 13 oz.

Russellville's Randy Allen was ninth with a bag of 6 lbs. 11 oz. Conway's Brian Choate was 37th with two fish at 2 lbs. 15 oz., and Little Rock's Andrew Wooley landed one bass at 1 lb. to sit in 48th.

Eighteen of the 48 co-anglers brought in the tournament limit with five landing just a single bass.

The full field of boaters and co-anglers will take to Lake Hamilton today at 6:30 a.m., launching from Andrew H. Hulsey Fish Hatchery, and the weigh-in will be held at 2:30 p.m. The top 10 anglers from each division, based on their two-day cumulative weight, will then compete in a winner-takes-all competition on Saturday.

The top 10 will keep their weights from the first two days of competition, and the boater and co-angler with the heaviest three-day cumulative weights will be named the 39th Phoenix Bass Fishing League All-American Champions.

Boater Top 201st: Connor Cunningham, Springfield, Mo., five bass, 17-82nd: Ryan Powroznik, Hopewell, Va., five bass, 12-143rd: Sean Wieda, Alexandria, Ky., five bass, 12-84th: Hunter Eubanks, Inman, S.C., five bass, 11-145th: Brian Bean, Hot Springs, five bass, 11-136th: Preston Henson, College Grove, Tenn., five bass, 11-77th: Brad Jelinek, Lincoln, Mo., five bass, 11-38th: David Lowery, Milledgeville, Ga., five bass, 11-09th: Andy Wicker, Cayce, S.C., five bass, 10-1410th: Jonathan Crossland, Chapin, S.C., five bass, 10-1311th: Wade Ramsey, Choctaw, Okla., five bass, 10-612th: Drew Tabor, Harrison, five bass, 10-312th: David Bright, Mooresville, N.C., five bass, 10-314th: Kevin Brown, Hot Springs, five bass, 10-215th: Justin Kimmel, Athens, Ga., five bass, 9-916th: Chris Wilkinson, Farmersburg, Ind., five bass, 9-717th: Steve Phillips, Douglas, Ga., five bass, 9-118th: Mike Reid, Greenville, Texas, five bass, 9-018th: Matthew Marinelli, Salem, Conn., five bass, 9-020th: Jarrett Martin, Mansfield, Ohio, five bass, 8-1420th: Matt Henry, Milledgeville, Ga., five bass, 8-14

Co-angler Top 20

1st: Billy Rusher, Lincoln, five bass, 11-42nd: Evan Eldred, Gaines, Mich., five bass, 9-153rd: Hunter Dahnke, Missoula, Mont., five bass, 9-04th: Cory Guinn, Mountain Rest, S.C., five bass, 8-145th: Kenneth Hunnicut, Jacksonville, Fla., five bass, 7-136th: Zachary Verbugge, Lake Havasu, Ariz., five bass, 7-106th: Jeffery Johnson, Austin, Ind., five bass, 7-108th: Clint Horton, Falkner, Miss., five bass, 7-29th: Scott Blaesi, Maxwell, Neb., five bass, 6-1110th: Eric Eden, Hartsville, Tenn., five bass, 6-1011th: Harrison McCall, Salisbury, N.C., five bass, 6-512th: Chandler White, Covington, Ga., five bass, 6-113th: Pop Catalin, Cookeville, Tenn., five bass, 6-014th: Gary Owens, Columbus, Ind., five bass, 5-1315th: Alan Hill, Ada, Okla., three bass, 5-1216th: Tyler Stuart, Manchester, Mo., five bass, 5-1017th: Randy Hudson, Columbus, N.C., five bass, 5-818th: Randy Paquette, Sarasota, Fla., four bass, 5-319th: Luke Schmits, Alexandria, Ky., four bass, 5-019th: Samuel Jones, Fuquay Varina, N.C., five bass, 5-0

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