loading
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Indian Land, SC

Let's Talk!

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Indian Land:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Indian Land, SC

SC on Aravallis: Judgment will have implications across country

The Supreme Court’s Thursday judgement that all land covered by the special orders issued under Section 4 of the Punjab Land Preservation Act should be treated as forests and that the provisions of forest conservation act 1980 will apply to these -- ensuring that thousands of hectares of the Aravallis in Haryana will now have to be treated as forests.“The Supreme Court judgment not only protects the forest of Haryana in general and Aravallis in particular, it also clarifies the legal position in terms of the interpretation...

The Supreme Court’s Thursday judgement that all land covered by the special orders issued under Section 4 of the Punjab Land Preservation Act should be treated as forests and that the provisions of forest conservation act 1980 will apply to these -- ensuring that thousands of hectares of the Aravallis in Haryana will now have to be treated as forests.

“The Supreme Court judgment not only protects the forest of Haryana in general and Aravallis in particular, it also clarifies the legal position in terms of the interpretation of the Punjab Land Preservation Act, 1900 vis a vis the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980. It is significant that the Court has clearly concluded that the areas closed under Special Order have all the trappings of a forest. The Court’s order injects a fresh lease of life to the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 which has been diluted by the Government. The judgment will have implications across the Country since the Court stated clearly that the term forest cannot be limited to areas notified as forest under the Indian Forest Act, 1927 but will extend to other areas which qualify as forest irrespective of whether they are notified in government record or not,” said Ritwick Dutta, environmental lawyer who was representing Aravali Bachao Citizens Movement in SC.

The court’s ruling will mean around 30,000 hectares across the Aravallis and Shivaliks in Haryana will be considered forest land. “Twenty-five years of Aravalli jurisprudence has been reaffirmed and further clarified by this order,” said Chetan Agarwal, a Gurugram based environmentalist.

“Aravallis are geological features that are around 2 billion years old. They have shaped the whole drainage system in Delhi NCR. Most of our groundwater recharge happens through the Aravallis. It is a pollution sink and helps arrest desertification in the region. It is also a reservoir of biodiversity. In terms of biodiversity, we are still discovering new species. Last year we discovered 3 new species of trees in the Haryana Aravallis. There are trees that have been missing from our records and now being discovered. We have a good leopard population, jackals, hyenas, mongooses of two kinds, porcupines and a very good bird population,” said naturalist Vijay Dhasmana.

The order is particularly important because the proposed draft Regional Plan 2041 (RP-2041) of National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB) has deleted key regulations that were meant to protect the Aravallis, rivers, water bodies and forests. Highlighting eight such deletions in the draft, experts said these could be detrimental to NCR’s ecology.

The deletions included clauses limiting construction to 0.5% of the area in natural conservation zones; ensuring a forest cover of 10% in the NCR; and bringing wasteland them under forest cove. A proposed land-use map for NCR was also deleted. Haryana’s attempts in the past to dilute the provisions that conserve the Aravallis have been red-flagged by several environmental and legal experts.

The draft plan was published by National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB) on its website on December 9, seeking public comments. HT reported on January 18 that over 3,000 people objected to the removal of a clause limiting construction in natural conservation zones to 0.5% of the total area.

The finalisation and approval of the draft RP-2041 was included in the agenda of the NCRPB’s 42nd meeting this July and according to that agenda, the board received 2,703 objections/suggestions to the draft plan. Around 2,590 of them requested the restoration of the earlier NCZ (natural conservation zones) provisions. The agenda showed that Haryana did not want ‘hills’ to be covered in natural zones. It also did not want any reference to directions by courts and National Green Tribunal as they are appealable in Supreme Court. Haryana said the rights of private individuals cannot be taken away by provisions for natural zones under draft Regional Plan 2041. Haryana also submitted that any NCZ, approved by NCRPB, can be changed by a state based on revenue records, satellite imagery and ground truthing.

“The Supreme Court has upheld that land covered by special orders under Section 4 of the PLPA will have provisions of the Forest Conservation Act applicable to them-- that they can’t be used for non-forest uses without the requisite permissions from the Centre. It has also recognised that these areas have the ‘trappings of a forest’. It has asked for demolition of structures that have been made without permission and restoration and afforestation in these areas. It is most significant that the Court has highlighted the provisions of the PLPA which refer to the prevention of deforestation and soil erosion. In today’s era of climate change, saving our soil and preventing the cutting of trees are most urgent, which a 1900 Act was able to value. India is part of the Glasgow Climate Pact that calls for restoration and conservation of natural ecosystems, and the SC order will help us meet our climate goals,” said Neha Sinha, conservation biologist and author.

Mumbai News Highlights: SC says pleas filed by Sena, rebel MLAs raise constitutional questions

Mumbai News Updates (July 20): The Supreme Court on Wednesday said the petitions filed by the Shiv Sena and its rebel MLAs raise many constitutional questions which require consideration by a larger bench. A bench headed by Chief Justice N V Ramana directed the parties to formulate issues which require examination by a larger bench by July 27. “After he...

Mumbai News Updates (July 20): The Supreme Court on Wednesday said the petitions filed by the Shiv Sena and its rebel MLAs raise many constitutional questions which require consideration by a larger bench. A bench headed by Chief Justice N V Ramana directed the parties to formulate issues which require examination by a larger bench by July 27. “After hearing the counsels it has been agreed that some issues may, if necessary, be referred to a larger bench also. Keeping in mind the same, to enable the parties to frame the issues, let them file the same preferably by next Wednesday,” the bench also comprising Justices Krishna Murari and Hima Kohli said.

The Enforcement Directorate has issued fresh summons to Shiv Sena MP Sanjay Raut to appear before it for questioning on Wednesday in a money laundering case linked to alleged irregularities in the re-development of a Mumbai ‘chawl’ and related transactions involving his wife and ‘associates’, officials said. The Rajya Sabha MP, who is in the Uddhav Thackeray camp, had denied any wrongdoing and alleged that he was being targeted due to political vendetta. Raut has been asked to depose at the agency’s regional office in Mumbai. (PTI)

In other news, Crops across nearly 1.35 lakh hectares of land have been damaged due to floods in several parts of Vidarbha region, said Deputy Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis, who visited the flood-hit districts of Wardha and Chandrapur on Tuesday. Farmers are likely to incur additional financial burden due to incessant rain in the last seven days, he said.

More from Cities

LOAD MORE

The Enforcement Directorate (ED) on Tuesday filed an affidavit before the special court opposing the bail application of NCP leader Nawab Malik. Malik had moved the bail plea on merits after the central agency filed a chargesheet against him in April. Malik, a minister in the earlier Maha Vikas Aghadi government, was arrested in February on allegations of money laundering.

An NCP delegation led by Leader of Opposition Ajit Pawar met Chief Minister Eknath Shinde and Deputy Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis asking them not to engage in “revenge politics”.

The meeting comes in the backdrop of the Shinde-Fadnavis government reversing policy decisions of the earlier MVA government. The new government has also put a stay on allotment of finance for developmental projects cleared by the MVA and has decided to postpone elections in cooperative establishments in the state.

“Ordering a stay on everything is not ideal example of governance. Governments change but projects should continue. There are examples where funds allocated in the last fiscal, too, have been stayed. Why are you punishing the people for whom these projects have been planned?” Pawar said.

The state government said it is not halting any essential projects and was barely repeating what the previous government did when it came to power in 2019.

“We have not stopped any essential project. We have stopped projects where decisions on fund allocation were taken after the previous government lost the majority. We will review the demands of the Opposition,” Shinde said.

Fadnavis said, “They did the same when they came to power. But let me assure you that we won’t be unjust. We have received a letter from them and we will review it,” said Fadnavis.

A major connector between Fort Mill and Indian Land could get a lot better. Here’s why.

Lancaster County is ready to move forward on Regent Parkway.The busy road connecting York and Lancaster counties, one that’s been a point of contention for years, will become public. The move allows for improvements to aid traffic in a growing area between Fort Mill and Indian Land.After an executive session Monday night, Lancaster County Council voted to authorize the settlement of a lawsuit filed by the county in early 2021. The case is a notice of condemnation against Regent Parkway Partners. A lengthy list of homeowne...

Lancaster County is ready to move forward on Regent Parkway.

The busy road connecting York and Lancaster counties, one that’s been a point of contention for years, will become public. The move allows for improvements to aid traffic in a growing area between Fort Mill and Indian Land.

After an executive session Monday night, Lancaster County Council voted to authorize the settlement of a lawsuit filed by the county in early 2021. The case is a notice of condemnation against Regent Parkway Partners. A lengthy list of homeowners also are listed as defendants. Council voted to settle the case for $120,000.

“The county has agreed to pay a settlement for the condemnation of Regent Park Parkway,” said Dennis Marstall, Lancaster County administrator. “This process has been going on for a while.”

The property listed for condemnation is almost 4 acres within the Regent Park right-of-way. It’s between Harrisburg Road and Sugar Creek at the York County line. Regent Parkway Partners acquired the property from Opus Regent Two in mid-2020.

The legal case states the reason for condemnation:

“The real property is being condemned for the purpose of Lancaster County obtaining possession and legal title to Regent Parkway so that improvements can be made to Regent Parkway, a private roadway in poor repair that provides infrastructure connectivity to York County for many Lancaster County citizens. Regent Parkway will become a part of the public road network of Lancaster County.”

The suit also listed a compensation amount of $16,000 when it was filed.

Regent Parkway has long-served heavy traffic, from early days of Heritage USA in Fort Mill to development of the Regent Park neighborhood, MorningStar Fellowship Church property and more. Yet the road is private. It’s had multiple owners.

In early 2018 ‘no trespassing’ signs went up which prompted public outcry. Both commuters and residents who lived in the neighborhoods developed off Regent Parkway asked the county to help.

South Carolina Department of Transportation doesn’t list traffic count data for Regent Parkway. It does have a figure of 18,000 average daily trips for U.S. 21 in Fort Mill, just in front of the York County entrance to Regent Parkway. York County owns the portion of Regent Parkway within its borders.

Regent Parkway is a connector to several popular areas, from Carowinds and Fort Mill on the west to Carolina Place the mall and restaurants in Pineville, N.C. to the east. New residential subdivisions are common all along the area served by the parkway.

Lancaster County Councilman Brian Carnes said the county has done some work already. Because of how condemnation law works, he said, the county was allowed to work as if the property was county-owned while the sides determined a price for the condemnation. The county has done more than $20,000 in patch work.

“It held up pretty good,” Carnes said, “but it really needs that complete reconstruction.”

Carnes still gets calls about the road, either when there’s a wreck or when potholes surface.

The decision Monday allows the county to move forward with plans to go in and “grind up the road and start over again,” Carnes said. Timing details aren’t set. It will take a few days to grind down the half-mile stretch of road in need of repair, he said, but the surface will need to settle before repaving.

The move Monday, though, was a big step forward.

“It’s been back and forth, went through mediation,” Carnes said. “We approved the settlement that the mediators came up with. It’s already in the works to be bid out.”

Does wine give you a headache? This Indian Land, SC winery offers a solution

Many a business venture gets sorted out over a glass of wine. This one came from the glass itself.More specifically, the venture came from the next morning headache Mary Anna Ossa experienced two years ago after a night out with her best friend on a family trip to Spain.“We were drinking wine in a bar, and we were talking about how we figured the next day we were going to feel awful because we had a few too many glasses,” Ossa said. “And in fact we did.”Ossa, a Venezuelan native who moved to this ...

Many a business venture gets sorted out over a glass of wine. This one came from the glass itself.

More specifically, the venture came from the next morning headache Mary Anna Ossa experienced two years ago after a night out with her best friend on a family trip to Spain.

“We were drinking wine in a bar, and we were talking about how we figured the next day we were going to feel awful because we had a few too many glasses,” Ossa said. “And in fact we did.”

Ossa, a Venezuelan native who moved to this country 23 years ago for grad school, did some research. She learned tannins, sulfites and sugars added to wine is what causes the headaches. She also learned of minimal intervention farming that can create organic, vegan wine that does not cause headaches.

“I know I’m not the only one who has this problem, who gets a headache after a couple of glasses of wine,” Ossa said. “So I decided, why not bring this delicious organic wine to the states?”

Ossa and that best friend began a partnership that Ossa since has bought out to maintain full ownership of Partners & Grapes. The pair found a generational vineyard in Spain worked in a similar way for more than 500 years. No pesticides, fertilizers, or tractors are used.

“Everything is done by hand,” Ossa said.

Red and white options were created. There’s a rose coming and Ossa would like to have a sparkling version by the holidays. The boutique wine company that launched six months ago produces 300-500 bottles a month.

Ossa moved to Indian Land after 16 years in Charlotte. Her warehouse is south of the state line and the company is licensed to distribute in South Carolina. Late last month her company announced an expansion into the North Carolina market.

“Charlotte is the perfect market product, because there’s a huge trend of people looking for healthier options in North Carolina,” Ossa said.

Greenville, Charleston and other cities across the Carolinas are targets for future expansion. So are Florida and Georgia. Yet the type of farming needed for Ossa’s wines and the strict organic and vegan certifications mean it isn’t something customers will find in large grocery stores.

“It’s impossible to mass produce it,” Ossa said.

The Southern Olive, Stateline Elite and Carolina Wines & Spirits carry the products in Indian Land. Churchill’s Liquor & Wine in Fort Mill has it, as will the new The Social Cork Wine Bar. All three Grapevine locations — Rock Hill, Fort Mill, York — carry it.

There have been challenges starting a new business during the COVID-19 pandemic. Especially one that transports regulated adult beverages across the world from the Penedes region of Catalan Spain to a startup seller in Indian Land.

“Challenge is an understatement,” Ossa said. “Delays go from 60 to 90 days. I was ready to bring my rose, which is my third wine, and it should have been here in the beginning of June. It’s still not here, and we don’t know when it will be here.”

Her last shipment of red and white sat in New Jersey for a month without available trucking to get it to South Carolina. While extra aging time may do wonders for wines, it’s tough on the business end of distribution. Ossa said she tries to order what she can with enough advance time, like the sparkling wine she hopes to get by the holidays.

Ossa wanted to create her own blends, not just her own label on someone else’s wine. She also wanted the fill organic and vegan certification, not just wine with organic grapes.

“There are other companies that offer organic wines,” Ossa said. “None of them are local.”

It’s a bit odd describing the taste difference between her wines and typical ones, Ossa said.

“It tastes clean,” she said. “You can feel it in your palette, how clean it is.”

The day after drinking it, though, Ossa said the difference is clear.

While there’s no accounting for what else drinkers may be up to in addition to their drinks, if they have a headache the next day they can’t blame the wine.

“I tell people, you will get drunk if you drink an entire bottle,” Ossa said. “But you will not get a headache.”

This story was originally published July 5, 2022 12:34 PM.

An Indian Land vote will soon carry more weight. What it means for the growing area

Votes from the Lancaster County panhandle are going to count more, soon.Lancaster County Council will meet Monday to finalize redistricting. Every 10 years, the county uses federal census population data to redraw its voting lines. New districts are required to balance population changes. Most the county’s growth over the past decade was in the Indian Land panhandle, which will mean a louder political voice when the new lines are set.The panhandle has two of seven Council seats. The new map up for a final vote Monday give...

Votes from the Lancaster County panhandle are going to count more, soon.

Lancaster County Council will meet Monday to finalize redistricting. Every 10 years, the county uses federal census population data to redraw its voting lines. New districts are required to balance population changes. Most the county’s growth over the past decade was in the Indian Land panhandle, which will mean a louder political voice when the new lines are set.

The panhandle has two of seven Council seats. The new map up for a final vote Monday gives the panhandle three seats.

The new map also gives greater weight to Indian Land votes. Because current districts were set a decade ago, spread evenly then countywide, there are far more people in panhandle districts today than in the other five. More people in a district mean each vote, relatively, counts a little less than it would in a district with fewer people.

If the seven districts were split evenly, each would have 13,717 people. The northernmost Indian Land panhandle district, Dist. 7, has more than 8,700 more people, or 63% more people than evenly split districts would have. Dist. 7 has double or more the total population of every other Lancaster County district, except its nearest neighbor.

Dist. 1 runs from about Sun City to north of Lancaster, and includes the Van Wyck area. Geographically, it covers a little more of the panhandle than Dist. 7 does. Dist. 1 has about 6,200 more people than an even district would, or almost 46% more.

All non-panhandle districts have between 2,200 and 3,500 fewer people today, or 17-26% fewer, than even districts would.

The new map up for vote Monday shrinks the geography for existing panhandle districts, and adds a new one.

The northernmost area would now be in Dist. 4. It runs from the North Carolina line and Charlotte border to north of the county convenience center and sheriff’s office substation. The smallest geographic district is entirely west of U.S. 521.

The new Dist. 1 picks up where Dist. 4 stops and goes south, almost entirely west of U.S. 521, until it reaches south of the panhandle. It includes Sun City, several schools and the Rock Hill Highway connection.

Dist. 7 could run east of U.S. 521, or Charlotte Highway, from the state line to almost Rebound Road on the south. It would be the second smallest district by land mass.

The new map would put more people in the panhandle districts than those in the south. Yet the panhandle districts would only have 2-6% more people than if all districts had the same number. State law, the Home Rule Act of 1975, allows districts to vary by up to 10%. Districts outside the panhandle would range from less than 1% to almost 4% fewer residents than an even split, according to new map.

Today, 82% of Dist. 1 and 73% of Dist. 7 — the two existing panhandle districts — are white. Less than 10% of either district is Black.

Dist. 2 in the downtown Lancaster area is the only district with a Black majority — 58% Black, 31% white.

Under the new district map:

? Dist. 1 (81%), Dist. 7 (75%) and Dist. 4 (69%) show a white majority. All three districts are about 10% Black. The districts range from 5-10% Hispanic.

? Dist. 2 in Lancaster would remain the only Black majority at 54% Black, 33% white and 10% Hispanic.

The special called meeting to finalize lines begins at 6 p.m. Monday at Council Chambers in Lancaster.

Residents will have an opportunity to address Council.

Due to COVID-19, the county began live streaming meetings on its Youtube page.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.