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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Indian Land, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Indian Land:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Indian Land, SC

Downtown Rock Hill business sites, new Indian Land school in latest $1M property sales

Two dozen high-end property sales to close out 2023 included new Indian Land school sites, downtown Rock Hill commercial space, co-working in Fort Mill and space for more residential growth, a review of public records by The Herald found.December had about as many single-family home sales at $1 million or more as it did other commercial or other type sales at that price point. Lancaster County had the most expensive sale.Here’s a look at the transactions that tipped the $1 million mark: Read Next January 0...

Two dozen high-end property sales to close out 2023 included new Indian Land school sites, downtown Rock Hill commercial space, co-working in Fort Mill and space for more residential growth, a review of public records by The Herald found.

December had about as many single-family home sales at $1 million or more as it did other commercial or other type sales at that price point. Lancaster County had the most expensive sale.

Here’s a look at the transactions that tipped the $1 million mark:

Read Next

January 02, 2024 1:47 PM

? Apartments on Pardue Circle in Lancaster sold Dec. 12 for $11.7 million. A Greenville company bought more than 17 acres and almost 30 buildings. They range from 1,200 to almost 12,000 square feet and were built in 1972. The apartments are just off Hwy. 9 Bypass, south of Meeting Street.

? M/I Homes bought several parcels from JSII Builders. The Dec. 20 sale for $6.3 million at Chester Highway and Old Pinckney Road in York includes 12 addresses on Cedar Street. One parcel has a more than 10,000-square-foot storage garage on it. The properties are near the Meritor manufacturing site and several large, open land tracts. They back up to a more than 1,300 Flying King Ranch property.

? The Star Plaza office building in Fort Mill sold Dec. 21 for $4 million. The more than 60,000-square-foot building on almost 8 acres sits between The Cascades at River Crossing subdivision, the Traditions at Fort Mill apartments and a 50-acre Novant Health property along Interstate 77 at Sutton Road.

A Charlotte company in the Arrow Pine Business Park bought the 534 River Crossing Dr. site in Fort Mill. The two-story office facility was built in 2001. Portrait Homes Construction Company sold it to Rock Hill Partners One in early 2001, and a company called Star Plaza took ownership in 2003. Auto-Owners Insurance got the property last May from Star Plaza through an almost $4.3 million foreclosure.

Souder Properties, a company that listed the property for sale and has the same address as the new owner, now lists the site as The Connect co-working space. Souder has several co-working spaces throughout the Charlotte metro.

Read Next

Business

January 01, 2024 6:00 AM

? More than 20 acres of commercial space at 1683 Rock Hill Hwy. in Lancaster County sold Dec. 13 for $4 million. Surefin Mechanical Equipment sold the site to Oldcastle APG South from Greensboro, North Carolina. The heavy industrial property has an almost 29,000-square-foot building constructed in 2016.

? Two Lancaster County properties, one each on Harrisburg and Dale Pettus roads, sold Dec. 7 for a total of $3.7 million. They combine for more than 70 acres. The Lancaster County School District bought both Indian Land properties.

The school district bought other properties in the area in recent months and is in the planning stage for a new school bond referendum that could include a second high school in the Indian Land area. The two new purchases are connected, near the end of Valley Hill Road on the northern end of the Lancaster County panhandle.

Read Next

Education

November 14, 2023 11:47 AM

? Almost 12 acres at 8875 Charlotte Hwy. in Indian Land sold Dec. 15 for nearly $3.3 million. Sam’s Commercial Properties out of Matthews, North Carolina, bought the land that includes a home built in 1920. The property sits on the corner of U.S. 521 and Possum Hollow Road, beside Restoration Church property.

? Six downtown Rock Hill commercial properties sold Dec. 1 for $2.2 million. A Rock Hill company with the same address as Warren Norman Company bought the sites.

The almost 6,700-square-foot Roddey Trust Building at 235 E. Main St. is included. It was built in 1955. Also part of the sale are 223 and 225 Main St., plus 337 and 341 Oakland Ave. Those addresses add about 6,000 more square feet.

The new owner now has seven properties that tie together the eastern portion of the East Main and Oakland intersection, beside about 3 acres owned by Comporium. The properties are north of Fountain Park. A new $40 million performing arts center will go on the other end of Fountain Park.

Warren Norman has extensive new development and redevelopment work in Rock Hill. New restaurants and service businesses at The Perch and Allston are recent examples. Warren Norman also continues to rework the Galleria Mall tenant lineup with the recent addition of the Stars & Strikes family entertainment center and a new Ashley Furniture store planned to open in summer 2024.

? Eleven vacant residential properties sold Dec. 28 for more than $1.8 million. They’re on Longwaters Court, Valita Road and Norcross Spring Court in Lake Wylie. The properties are part of the lakefront Handsmill community. A Florida real estate company bought the properties.

? Daniel Island company RH Collision Partners bought an almost 13,000-square-foot retail building at 1262 Riverchase Blvd. It’s the former site of Illumine Church. The $1.7 million sale happened on Dec. 14. The site is near both Celanese Road and Interstate 77.

? H&H Construction out of Fayettville, North Carolina, bought 19 lots in the Baileys Run subdivision on Dec. 12 for more than $1.5 million. The Oxtail Court addresses are off Hands Mill Highway in Rock Hill. The lots are listed as the sixth phase of the subdivision.

? Three Charlotte Highway addresses in Lake Wylie sold Dec. 8 for $1.5 million. They combine for almost 4 acres. DTJT Properties out of Paw Creek, North Carolina, bought 5820, 5830 and 5842 Charlotte Hwy. The connected properties are beside the long-time Dock Masters Marine Construction business. The same former property owner sold that site in November for $1.2 million. The three parcels are vacant and zoned for commercial development.

? Three vacant residential properties on Benford Drive and Blake Street in Rock Hill sold Dec. 20 for almost $1.5 million. Most of the property is a 22-acre piece at 1611 Benford Dr. The Rock Hill School District sold the property to Fort Mill-based Edgewood Place SC. The former school site is just off Heckle Boulevard.

? Ten residential lots on Triple Ponds Court, Edmunds Lane and Plowshare Way sold Dec. 29 for more than $1 million. The Clover properties are part of the Edmunds Farm subdivision. Knotts Builders out of Pineville, North Carolina, bought the parcels.

? Only one of the 11 homes that sold in December for $1 million or more was in Rock Hill, but it was the most expensive. A Joslin Pointe Lane home sold for more than $1.9 million. Six of the 11 homes are in Fort Mill. Two each are in Indian Land and Lake Wylie. Use the map below for details on each sale.

This story was originally published January 3, 2024, 1:24 PM.

Costco plans at The Exchange at Indian Land in SC move forward

A new Costco would bring convenience, cash and car traffic to Indian Land. So far, the convenience and cash are tilting the scale.Lancaster County Council moved forward on Monday with a zoning plan and other changes related to the Costco project in Indian Land. There’s one vote down and two remaining on the zoning change.The Exchange at Indian Land is a 130-acre project on U.S. 521, or Charlotte Highway. It inclu...

A new Costco would bring convenience, cash and car traffic to Indian Land. So far, the convenience and cash are tilting the scale.

Lancaster County Council moved forward on Monday with a zoning plan and other changes related to the Costco project in Indian Land. There’s one vote down and two remaining on the zoning change.

The Exchange at Indian Land is a 130-acre project on U.S. 521, or Charlotte Highway. It includes a new Costco with gas station proposal at 8918 Charlotte Highway. The ongoing decision involves a zoning change at 28-acre piece of industrial property to be included in the project.

Councilman Jose Luis pushed back on the idea that Costco couldn’t build on the acreage already zoned for its type of business, which would leave the industrial property for other potential development. Parking, the orientation of the Costco and more depend on the additional 28 acres, said county interim planning director Allison Hardin.

“You can make certain changes,” Luis said. “You may not like them, but you can make them. And they may cost you a little more, but you can make them.”

Luis wanted details on traffic and other impacts the new development could bring. Some discussion Monday involved the influx of new traffic the site could generate from Charlotte. The site is on the Indian Land panhandle, just south of Ballantyne.

“We are going to have a significant impact,” Luis said. “We are not ready for that.”

Councilman Billy Mosteller said for years he’s gotten the almost daily comments that people in Lancaster County want shopping options here, so they won’t have to go to Charlotte.

“Everybody that I’ve talked to is supporting it, wanting it,” Mosteller said.

Mosteller believes people in Indian Land, even ones concerned with traffic and growth pressures, will want the new Costco.

“Those people that you’re talking about,” Mosteller said to Luis, “will be the first ones at the door when that place opens.”

Councilman Terry Graham said panhandle traffic has to be considered.

“The problem is, will they be able to get there with the traffic?” Graham said.

Yates Dunaway with developer Crossland Southeast said other area development and commitments in place make the Costco project dependent on the smaller site to be rezoned.

“Some of that (larger) property has been sold off,” Dunaway said. “Some of it’s been leased to tenants. So that ship has kind of set sail.”

Dunaway said between property, sales and other taxes the new Costco would have an estimated $3.6 million annual tax impact for the county.

“From a property tax standpoint, it’s estimated to be about $1 million a year,” Dunaway said. “And then the total sales...a conservative Costco would to about $200 million in sales.”

The larger Exchange project announced plans previously for a Lowes Foods supermarket, hundreds of apartments or townhomes and other retail space.

This story was originally published June 15, 2023, 12:47 PM.

803-329-4076

John Marks graduated from Furman University in 2004 and joined the Herald in 2005. He covers community growth, municipalities, transportation and education mainly in York County and Lancaster County. The Fort Mill native earned dozens of South Carolina Press Association awards and multiple McClatchy President’s Awards for news coverage in Fort Mill and Lake Wylie.

Will Indian Land get new schools as population soars? Here’s what has to happen first

A lot still has to happen before Indian Land, or Lancaster County, gets new schools from a bond referendum. And this summer, a lot is happening.A bond subcommittee for the Lancaster County school board met last week to outline plans ahead of an anticipated public vote in March. It was the fourth meeting for the group, to discuss details that will be laid out for the full school board when it meets July 11.“This is not something that, I want folks to understand, is in stone,” said school board member and subcommittee...

A lot still has to happen before Indian Land, or Lancaster County, gets new schools from a bond referendum. And this summer, a lot is happening.

A bond subcommittee for the Lancaster County school board met last week to outline plans ahead of an anticipated public vote in March. It was the fourth meeting for the group, to discuss details that will be laid out for the full school board when it meets July 11.

“This is not something that, I want folks to understand, is in stone,” said school board member and subcommittee facilitator Melvin Stroble. “It gives us a guideline. Milestones to attempt to achieve through this process.”

If the full school board approves, a facility needs committee could be set up by July 19. A 14-member committee would include participants from each voting district in the county. That committee would present recommendations to the bond subcommittee, which would present to the full school board.

“The facility needs committee is, we believe, is critical in this process to ensure that we are continuing to gain community input and feedback in this process,” Stroble said.

The bond subcommittee isn’t committing to specific projects before the facility needs group does its work. Yet, there are obvious need areas. Indian Land is one of the fastest-growing areas in the Carolinas. Earlier in the week at a medical facility ribbon cutting, state Rep. Mike Neese noted how Indian Land transitioned from an area that didn’t have a grocery store to what now would be, if incorporated, the eighth largest city in the state.

Read Next

Community

May 19, 2023 8:15 AM

Mary Beth Braham with architectural firm LS3P, a company approved by the school board for design work, mentioned several potential projects that have come up already in discussion about the bond next spring. Braham mentioned a new elementary and middle school for Indian Land at 1,000 students each, an elementary school in Lancaster for 600 students, a gym at Andrew Jackson High School and athletic upgrades in Buford. The subcommittee also mentioned a land sale in Indian Land at Wednesday’s meeting.

Nothing about that list if final or official.

“Clearly these are just the beginning points, of ideas,” Braham said.

If the bond plan progresses, the subcomittee would hear back from the facility needs committee on Aug. 2. The school board could select bond council in executive session on Aug. 15 and recommendations could be finalized on Aug. 30 for presentation to the school board. A public comment period would follow and draft wording on a bond referendum question could follow on Oct. 17.

If all those steps transpire, a bond referendum vote would come March 26, 2024.

The bond process this time is similar to one from 2016. Then, almost $200 million in bond money paid for a new high school and elementary school in Indian Land and land for the high school along with a host of upgrades at schools countywide.

$585M bond would include a new Indian Land high school. But a vital questions remains

Lancaster County voters could have a half-billion dollar decision that would buy a new high school in Indian Land. The question is, would folks south of S.C. 5 vote for it?The latest discussion on a countywide school bond referendum involves more than half of the funding going to the geographically small but population heavy panhandle. It would be the biggest school bond total in Lancaster County.The ...

Lancaster County voters could have a half-billion dollar decision that would buy a new high school in Indian Land. The question is, would folks south of S.C. 5 vote for it?

The latest discussion on a countywide school bond referendum involves more than half of the funding going to the geographically small but population heavy panhandle. It would be the biggest school bond total in Lancaster County.

The Lancaster County School Board passed a resolution Friday to move forward with a bond question it would put to voters Nov. 5. The project list and costs are preliminary, but the school board outlined a $585 million referendum.

It includes, by area:

? $321.6 million for Indian Land

A $225 million high school on the northern part of the panhandle would serve 2,000 students. That’s the same capacity as the Indian Land High School which opened in 2021. A new elementary school for 1,200 students would cost $93 million.

The existing high school would get $1.6 million in sports upgrades (baseball and softball storage, track and field restrooms). The area would get $2 million is security upgrades.

? $128.3 million for Lancaster

A new 1,200-student elementary school would cost $93 million. North Elementary School could then convert to a career programming and technology center at $15 million. The district would spent $9.3 million for cafeteria, media center, science lab and other upgrades at Lancaster High School. Then the district would use another $6 million for safety upgrades and $5 million for renovations at South Middle School.

? $95 million for Kershaw

A new elementary school for 1,000 students would cost $74 million. Andrew Jackson High School would get a new gym and other upgrades at $18 million, with another $3 million in the area for safety improvements.

? $16.7 million for Buford

Buford High School would have science lab and sports field — particularly baseball — upgrades. Buford Middle School would see a new front entrance and money toward its band room. Security upgrades would cover each school in the area.

Board member Courtney Green had an immediate response to the proposed list on Friday: “Buford won’t vote for it without a new middle school.”

Earlier versions showed the possibility of a new middle school for 500 students. Green said her Buford community, and likely others south of S.C. 5 that separates the panhandle from the rest of the county, would have a hard time approving a more than half-billion-dollar bond when most of that money goes to Indian Land.

People will ask why Indian Land should get another high school, she said. “They just got one,” Green said. “Why was it not built for more than 2,000 students?”

Several schools in the Lancaster area aren’t getting much, said board member Casey Cato. Voters there may not be enthused about so much attention in Indian Land.

“I taught at Brooklyn Springs,” Cato said. “We’ve added on and added on.”

More rural areas in southern Lancaster County, especially outside the city of Lancaster, don’t have anywhere near the population density the panhandle does. That means there are far more potential voters in the Indian Land area. Still, the school board wants a referendum the entire county can support.

Read Next

January 22, 2024 6:00 AM

Board member Melvin Stroble hears the concern from rural areas, but can’t ignore the numbers.

“Where you see new schools being identified, it is where you’re seeing growth,” Stroble said. “The growth in Indian Land far exceeded the projections.”

Two decades ago, Indian Land High School sports competed in the smallest classification South Carolina has. Next year the school will move to 5A, the state’s largest. This year there are about 100 more eighth-graders in Indian Land than seniors, meaning if no one else moves in or out, the high school still would grow by that amount next year.

Even the new high school opened three years ago was planned for 1,200 students, then 1,600 and eventually 1,800 students. Because the construction bid came in lower than expected the district bumped capacity to 2,000 students.

It’s projected by 2032 that Indian Land will have 3,600 high school students, according to the district.

“Where do we put the kids?” Stroble said. “I hear the concern. But we cannot continue to operate in a vacuum or believing we’re immune to what the county is doing.”

High schools also take longer to design and build than lower level schools. If plans started today for a new high school, it wouldn’t open until 2028.

Board member Margaret Gamble said schools perform best at certain enrollment sizes, and foregoing a new high school in Indian Land would create problems for that area. “We don’t want 4,000 (students) by any means,” Gamble said.

Even if this bond passes as presented, the district likely will need another one within a decade, Stroble said.

Property for new schools or most anything else costs much more in Indian Land today than it did a decade or more ago. Board members say they need to look at new areas primed for growth — Edgewater and Roselyn in Lancaster primarily — to plan ahead.

“In the past we haven’t looked at growth, to purchase land,” said board Chairman Brad Small.

School bond votes often happen with only the one decision on a ballot. A consultant in Lancaster County talked to the board about the potential impact of holding a school bond vote with a general election.

Any general election increases turnout. A presidential election bumps it even higher. The possibility of a rematch this fall between the current and most recent presidents, Joe Biden and Donald Trump, could mean large numbers of people who don’t show up at the voting booth thinking about school bonds.

While there’s a concern many such people will vote against a bond due to the tax increase, Small believes there are benefits to targeting the general election. Holding it a month or two earlier would cost more money. It could feel like an attempt to insulate the school vote from the highest turnout of county voters.

Putting the vote on the general election gives the school district further incentive to make sure a package serves the whole county, an could instill confidence the board wants to listen to residents.

“This is another way to build back that trust,” Small said.

Indian Land’s newest clinic is a sign the area is closer to having a nearby hospital

A new clinic had its ribbon cut Tuesday in Indian Land and is open to treat athletes, mishap patients with broken bones, seniors in need of joint replacements and other medical needs.The opening also was significant for another reason.“We are actively trying to grow the services that we provide here in Indian Land, in advance of plans to develop a hospital here ultimately,” said Scott Broome, CEO of the MUSC Health Lancaster Division.Medica...

A new clinic had its ribbon cut Tuesday in Indian Land and is open to treat athletes, mishap patients with broken bones, seniors in need of joint replacements and other medical needs.

The opening also was significant for another reason.

“We are actively trying to grow the services that we provide here in Indian Land, in advance of plans to develop a hospital here ultimately,” said Scott Broome, CEO of the MUSC Health Lancaster Division.

Medical University of South Carolina officials cut ribbon Tuesday morning on an orthopedic and sports medicine clinic at 2021 Bridgemill Drive. Services there will involve walk-in and appointment care from full-time orthopedists, a trained upper extremity specialist, vascular surgeon, neurologist trained in sleep medicine and epilepsy, and other services. It will have digital x-ray, 12 exam rooms and three procedure rooms. The three full-time orthopedists and other specialists could serve 100 patients a day, and grow to serve up to 200 patients.

The new clinic is across U.S. 521, or Charlotte Highway, from a larger medical site planned by MUSC. The hospital group expects to have state approvals soon for a hospital and medical office building.

The medical office should open late next year, followed by the hospital.

“A wide range of surgery like you would expect in a community hospital, of course an emergency department,” Broome said. “We would anticipate that we’d see 50 to 70 patients per day there. And then a number of specialists working in and around the hospital in a wide range of specialties.”

The top driver making the case for a new hospital, Broome said, is population.

“Twenty years ago we didn’t even have a grocery store here,” said S.C. Rep. Mike Neese. “And now, if we were a city, we’d be the eighth largest city in the state of South Carolina. That’s a perfect example of the amount of growth we’ve had.”

Indian Land is an unincorporated area of northwest Lancaster County that touches Mecklenburg and Union counties in North Carolina, and York County in South Carolina.

Geography is another key factor.

MUSC has a hospital in Lancaster, and partners with Lancaster and Chester county schools for medical care like sports medicine trainers.

“Most of these orthopedists (at Tuesday’s ribbon cutting) you’ll see on the sidelines of those football games,” said Richard Warren, COO for the MUSC Lancaster division.

However, for the Indian Land panhandle, existing MUSC services aren’t close.

“We want to keep Lancaster County patients in Lancaster County,” Broome said. “And right now, if they live in the northern part of the county, they don’t have the opportunity to do that. It’s much closer for them to go into Charlotte than it would be for them to go back into Lancaster proper for care.”

Broome said he believes the more local the care, the better. But hospitals must have support. They first need the medical staff and patient base.

“This is one of our first larger scale opportunities to have full-time practitioners, and in this case full-time orthopedists, in this market,” Broome said of the new clinic.

The new clinic isn’t just about a coming hospital. Someone with a broken bone or several other medical needs will find care they need there, now closer than ever for Indian Land. But it also is key to coming medical care.

“This is a big step forward,” Broome said.

Fort Mill had a new hospital open last year, with Piedmont Medical Center — Fort Mill. Fort Mill and Indian Land have been among the highest growth areas in the region and even country in recent decades. Both have medical offices of various sizes, there’s been a freestanding emergency room and numerous other healthcare additions of late.

“Indian Land has seen a lot of business growth, a lot of commercial growth, a lot of rooftop growth,” Broome said. “It’s time for us to have definitive healthcare services here.”

803-329-4076

John Marks graduated from Furman University in 2004 and joined the Herald in 2005. He covers community growth, municipalities, transportation and education mainly in York County and Lancaster County. The Fort Mill native earned dozens of South Carolina Press Association awards and multiple McClatchy President’s Awards for news coverage in Fort Mill and Lake Wylie.

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