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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Isle of Palms, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Isle of Palms:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Isle of Palms, SC

IOP councilman, former mayor fight back against beach parking law

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - More than a year after a state bill was passed that would ensure access to some free parking and give the state control of public roads in beach towns, the former mayor and a current councilman from the Isle of Palms say it is an “unprecedented attack upon the SC State Constitution and rule of law.”Isle of Palms Councilmember Blair Hahn and former Isle of Palms Mayor Jimmy Carroll sent an open letter to elected officials in the barrier island towns of the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island,...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - More than a year after a state bill was passed that would ensure access to some free parking and give the state control of public roads in beach towns, the former mayor and a current councilman from the Isle of Palms say it is an “unprecedented attack upon the SC State Constitution and rule of law.”

Isle of Palms Councilmember Blair Hahn and former Isle of Palms Mayor Jimmy Carroll sent an open letter to elected officials in the barrier island towns of the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach and Edisto Beach.

In the letter, Hahn and Carroll ask for support to fight back against senate bill S.40, which was signed into law by Gov. Henry McMaster in May 2021.

“We want the right to rule our community,” Carroll said. “We don’t want Columbia to tell us how to run this island.”

The bill requires free public beach parking, but also may include paid parking on state highways. Those highways have to be in communities that are eligible for beach renourishment funds, which use money to add sand back onto beaches.

Parking only can be restricted by the South Carolina Department of Transportation if they find that restrictions are necessary.

“Parking is not free,” Hahn said. “Parking costs emergency services, police services, fire services, it costs for landscaping for trash pickup. It costs money, somebody’s gotta bear that expense.”

It also requires governments to get approval from the South Carolina Department of Transportation before adding or making changes to state highways.

“It is blatantly illegal, it’s unconstitutional on four different grounds and it has to be stopped,” Hahn said.

Hahn says the Isle of Palms City Council has engaged legal counsel to explore their rights. Hahn says if they cannot negotiate a legal statute by amending or rescinding S.40, then they will go to the South Carolina Supreme Court.

The bill was sponsored by Sen. Larry Grooms (R- Berkeley). Grooms was not available for an interview at this time.

The South Carolina Department of Transportation has not yet responded to a request for comment.

Isle of Palms Mayor Phillip Pounds said: “The City continues to work with SCDOT to find solutions that are beneficial to our residents and visitors.”

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Isle of Palms prepares for late season storm

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — As Hurricane Nicole makes its way to the Lowcountry, officials along the coast are concerned about possible beach erosion.In September, Hurricane Ian left its mark on the Isle of Palms.“Lot of debris, for sure. Beach erosion was not so bad with Ian, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for Nicole coming up. But a lot of debris, trees down, flooding in our hotspots," says Philip Pounds, the mayor...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — As Hurricane Nicole makes its way to the Lowcountry, officials along the coast are concerned about possible beach erosion.

In September, Hurricane Ian left its mark on the Isle of Palms.

“Lot of debris, for sure. Beach erosion was not so bad with Ian, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for Nicole coming up. But a lot of debris, trees down, flooding in our hotspots," says Philip Pounds, the mayor of Isle of Palms.

In preparation for Nicole, IOP's Public Safety team surveyed the beaches.

“Our public safety folks did some drone footage earlier this week just to kind of have a base line for a pre-storm view, and then they’ll do a post probably Saturday when the storm clears out just to see if we have any erosion," continued Mayor Pounds.

The direction of the storm is also causing some concern.

“Didn’t have any issues with Ian. This one, again, since we’re on the other side of the storm, there’s certainly heightened concerns. But hopefully by the time it gets here, we’re talking 30 to 40 mile per hour winds mostly and storm surge of a couple of feet. Hopefully that won’t do too much, but we’ll probably have some issues," said Mayor Pounds.

Nicole is expected to bring heavy winds, rain, and possible isolated tornadoes, which is why Mayor Pounds is assuring the public he's preparing for the worst.

"We’ve pulled off all the trash cans that sit out on the beach for beachgoers. We’ll have some public safety personnel this week," Mayor Pounds says.

His main message is to be cautious.

“As we saw with Ian, the past changes pretty regularly and a few miles makes a big difference. This one seems pretty certain as far as the cone as where it’s going so, but certainly for residents just stay plugged in wherever you get your news from," said Mayor Pounds.

We also checked in with Sullivan's Island town officials. They say they will continue to keep an eye on the beaches, but no emergency evacuation order has been issued.

Lowcountry voters approve multiple county, municipal referendums

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- In addition to electing candidates to federal, state, and local offices, Lowcountry voters got to weigh in on a number of countywide and municipal referendums on Tuesday.By a narrow margin, voters in the Town of Mount Pleasant agreed to pay higher property taxes in order to raise $50 million for various parks and recreation projects.Voters approved the measure by a margin of 51 percent to 49 percent.According to officials, taxpayers will now pay approximately $80 per year or $6.67 per month on a ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- In addition to electing candidates to federal, state, and local offices, Lowcountry voters got to weigh in on a number of countywide and municipal referendums on Tuesday.

By a narrow margin, voters in the Town of Mount Pleasant agreed to pay higher property taxes in order to raise $50 million for various parks and recreation projects.

Voters approved the measure by a margin of 51 percent to 49 percent.

According to officials, taxpayers will now pay approximately $80 per year or $6.67 per month on a home appraised at a value of $500,000 for a period of 15 years.

It was a victory for town council members who encouraged votes in favor of the referendum, but a blow to Mayor Will Hayne who called the tax increase “irresponsible.”

The referendum will fund the newly proposed Rifle Range Park, renovate the Park West indoor pool, and add $1.7 million in new paths for the Mount Pleasant Way, among other projects.

There was a trio of referendums on the ballot in Berkeley County on Tuesday, all of which were overwhelmingly approved.

Voters approved two separate 1% sales tax referendums to fund road and school projects in one of the state’s fastest-growing counties.

The first question asked if Berkeley County residents would agree to fund $587 million across seven years of various transportation-related projects and facilities. That measure was approved by a roughly 48-point margin, with 74% of voters saying ‘yes.’ The second question asked voters to approve the issuing of $89 million in County Obligation Bonds from the special sales and use tax fund to fund the completion of infrastructure projects, which was also approved by a wide margin.

The one-percent special sales and use tax in Berkeley County was established in 2008 and approved in a separate, but similar referendum in 2014. It will now continue for another seven years.

The other one-percent sales tax increase, approved by a 71 percent to 29 percent vote, will be used to fund school improvement projects.

Dorchester County voters were asked whether they were in favor of continuing the one-percent sales and use tax to fund transportation improvements throughout the county.

The measure was approved by a 59 percent to 41 percent vote on Tuesday.

According to officials, the tax program has had a “significant” impact on Dorchester County roads since 2005, including providing funding for constructing new roadways, widening major thoroughfares, paving hundreds of miles of dirt roads, and financing drainage facilities and mass transit systems, among other projects.

The special sales and use tax will continue for the next 15 years.

They rejected the measure by a 71 percent to 29 percent vote.

Voters on the Isle of Palms were asked on Tuesday whether they would support reducing the size of the city council from eight members to six members.

Impacts From Nicole In South Carolina Later This Week

By Frank Strait for Island Eye NewsAs feared back on Friday, we have a new named Atlantic storm that threatens South Carolina later this week. Allow me to introduce you to Subtropical Storm Nicole.centered on Subtropical Storm Nicole.Source: University of Wisconsin RealEarthSome of you may be wondering what is a subtropical storm. In simple terms, it is a hybrid storm that has characteristics of both a tropical storm and an extratropical storm. An extratropical storm is an ordinary low-pressure area that we see ...

By Frank Strait for Island Eye News

As feared back on Friday, we have a new named Atlantic storm that threatens South Carolina later this week. Allow me to introduce you to Subtropical Storm Nicole.

centered on Subtropical Storm Nicole.Source: University of Wisconsin RealEarth

Some of you may be wondering what is a subtropical storm. In simple terms, it is a hybrid storm that has characteristics of both a tropical storm and an extratropical storm. An extratropical storm is an ordinary low-pressure area that we see typically move from west to east across North America with attached warm and cold fronts. Nicole formed out of a strong tropical wave joining forces with an upper-level low that was spinning east of The Bahamas.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecast indicates a wandering track in the general direction of Florida, then a northward turn toward us.

The NHC forecast track for Nicole, uncertainty cone,and current watches and warnings as of 11 a.m. Monday.

Remember that the track forecast indicates where NHC predicts where storm’s center will go and that the uncertainty cone refers to the range of possible center tracks, and not where actual impacts will occur. Significant effects from Nicole will occur outside of the cone. A full description of the cone is on NHC’s website.

The forecast track will take Nicole over water that is still around 82°F.

The 11 a.m. Monday NHC forecast track superimposed overa plot of sea surface temperatures.Source: NOAA PhOD Observations Viewer.

The forecast calls for Nicole to become a tropical storm by tomorrow evening, then a Category 1 hurricane by Wednesday morning. Interaction with land as it passes over Florida and perhaps Georgia will weaken Nicole as it turns northward, but it is still forecast to be a tropical storm with 50 mph winds when it passes over or near South Carolina on Friday night and early Saturday.

The current forecast track keeps the impacts from the storm mainly over the Coastal Plain, with limited rain and wind risks into the Midlands and Central Savannah River Area. Unless Nicole goes farther west than currently forecast, the parched Upstate will welcome the inch or so of rainfall Nicole will bring.

However, significant impacts will be felt in South Carolina well ahead of Nicole’s passage. Like we saw with Hurricane Ian, a strong high pressure area will be moving into the northeastern part of the country as Nicole approaches Florida. The resulting steep pressure gradient (the change in pressure over a distance) between these two weather features will cause gusty winds as air flows rapidly from high pressure toward low pressure.

These gusty winds will be out of the northeast on Wednesday, then becoming more easterly on Thursday, pushing water ashore along our coastal areas. If this wasn’t enough of a problem, we also have a full moon tomorrow (I incorrectly said a new moon in Friday’s alert … sorry for having my head in the clouds), and high astronomical tides from that will last all week. The onshore flow and high astronomical tides will cause another round of tidal flooding. This becomes a problem with tomorrow’s high tides and flooding will occur with each high tide the rest of this week. There is potential for major coastal flooding on Thursday morning along the Lowcountry coast.

Major tidal flooding is in the forecast for Thursday.

Coastal flooding will also be a concern along the Grand Strand, but the Lowcountry coast tends to be more vulnerable. Another round of coastal flooding appears likely Friday and Friday night as Nicole passes along our coastline and generates a storm surge. If this happens at high tide, major flooding will occur again.

With the current forecast track, the heaviest rain will occur over our Coastal Plain. The storm should be moving fast enough to prevent extreme rainfall totals, but there is potential for 3-6 inches in the Lowcountry and Pee Dee regions. That’s still a lot, so there will be a flash flooding risk. Of course, heavy rainfall at high tide will exacerbate coastal flooding, especially if there’s a storm surge ongoing. However, aside from the soaking that we saw from Ian, it’s been dry across the state for months, and river flooding will not be a big concern.

If Nicole passes along our coast as forecast, the risk for isolated tornadoes will remain confined to our coastal areas. Should Nicole track farther west while passing through South Carolina, the tornado risk will be higher and affect more of the state. A track more to the east will mean little or no tornado risk in the state but might result in more wind and surge along our coast.

It’s still early in the game with Nicole and some adjustments to the forecast are likely to happen. Still, it’s time to batten those hatches again if you live along our coast. Visit hurricane.sc for storm preparation tips. Meetings may keep me from issuing an alert tomorrow, but you can expect regular updates on Nicole Wednesday until the storm passes.

There is another possible developing storm well to the east of Bermuda today. However, it won’t pass anywhere near South Carolina and isn’t a concern for us. It will wander around east of Bermuda for the next day or so, then move away to the northeast.

developing about 700 miles east of Bermuda.Source: University of Wisconsin RealEarth.

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Resiliency, humility and hustle: MUSC celebrates military veterans, who bring key attributes to health care roles

MUSC veterans and supporters attended an online Veterans Day ceremony to honor their service, courage, sacrifices and their many contributions to protecting the nation, on Nov. 11. The event was held virtually to allow all employees and students to be part of the Veterans Day holiday.The ceremony started with the MUSC Public Safety Color Guard presenting the flags of the armed forces, which accompanied the national anthem. MUSC student 2nd Lt. Nadia Robinson shared the history and purpose of Veterans Day.Lt. Col. Joseph Bernard...

MUSC veterans and supporters attended an online Veterans Day ceremony to honor their service, courage, sacrifices and their many contributions to protecting the nation, on Nov. 11. The event was held virtually to allow all employees and students to be part of the Veterans Day holiday.

The ceremony started with the MUSC Public Safety Color Guard presenting the flags of the armed forces, which accompanied the national anthem. MUSC student 2nd Lt. Nadia Robinson shared the history and purpose of Veterans Day.

Lt. Col. Joseph Bernard, a retired United States Marine Corps officer who now serves as COO of MUSC Health-Midlands Division, was the keynote speaker for the virtual event, offered via Microsoft Teams.

Bernard pointed out the similarities between military service and working in the medical field.

“The past two plus years, under the dark cloud of the COVID pandemic, it has shown that resiliency is essential for us to be effective as individuals and as a team and organization,” said Bernard. “But military veterans bring a sense of humility and respect to the table, and they always bring a high energy and a willingness to hustle and get the job done. That bias for action allows us to accomplish the important mission of providing the highest quality of care across the state of South Carolina.”

Cathy Durham, DNP, showed the kind of veteran resilience Bernard referenced. In 2020, Durham worked on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City, the epicenter of the virus in those early days. Durham, the assistant dean for graduate practice programs and an associate professor in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program at MUSC’s College of Nursing, is a proud veteran, having joined the United States Navy in 1995. Since 2007, she has served in the Navy Reserve, where she holds the rank of captain. Her service in the Navy Nurse Corps led her to New York City to help during a very demanding time.

Durham said Veterans Day is special for her, since her family has a long history of military service. She chooses to spend the day with her spouse, who is also a veteran, and her family.

As chaplain and manager of Pastoral Care Services for MUSC Health-Charleston Division, Frank Harris draws on his own experience to support patients as well as the standards and values at MUSC. Harris served 10 years active duty in the United States Air Force, stationed in Oklahoma, Florida and Charleston. Additionally, he was deployed twice during both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. He said he observes the day reflecting on the experiences, the values he’s gained and the colleagues he served with.

Bernard also brought up teamwork and stated that awareness and care for those around is a shared value of both the military and MUSC. “Once you're in the military, it becomes readily apparent that you're not there for yourself,” Bernard said. “You're there to support those military members that are on your left, that are on your right. It's a team effort, that kind of collaboration and alignment is required to be successful in the US military.”

Rob Chisholm is the licensing and credentialing coordinator in the Graduate Medical Education Office in the College of Medicine. Chisholm spent five years active in the Air Force, where he was stationed in Michigan but also volunteered for special duty assignment at Rhein-Main Air Base in Germany. He said he chooses to be in community on Veterans Day. He said he contacts his brother, USAF retired, and his father, who also spent five years in the Air Force. He also attends a local Veterans Day parade in Charleston and visits the VFW Post on the Isle of Palms.

During his keynote address, Bernard shared his belief that the values of MUSC and those of the military intersect. “At MUSC, we have standards of professional behavior,” he said. “Those are compassion, collaboration, integrity, respect and innovation. If you think about each one of those behaviors and think about your time in the military, I think you can draw a very easy connection between your military service and what you do today at MUSC.”

Bernard also raised the subject of teamwork and stated that awareness and care for those around is a shared value of both the military and MUSC. “Once you're in the military, it becomes readily apparent that you're not there for yourself,” he explained. “You're there to support those military members that are on your left, that are on your right. It's a team effort; that kind of collaboration and alignment is required to be successful in the U.S. military.”

The afternoon concluded with Bernard conducting a Q&A session. Many veterans in attendance asked questions about his experience on Marine One, the helicopter that Bernard piloted during the Clinton administration. He finished his remarks with a quote from President Barack Obama: “When the world makes you cynical, whenever you seek true humility and true selflessness, look to a veteran.”

After decades serving country in Marines and VA, Robert Hincken donated brain to advance treatments for dementia.

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