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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Isle of Palms, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Isle of Palms:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Isle of Palms, SC

South Carolina Department Of Transportation To Provide Options For Restriping Isle Of Palms Connector

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsMembers of the Isle of Palms City Council Public Safety Committee will soon review alternatives for restriping the IOP Connector bridge. Eventually, the Committee will present three options for the community at large to consider.Public Safety Chair Jan Anderson reported at the Council’s June 28 meeting that the South Carolina Department of Transportation is nearing completion of Phase 1 of its study of the bridge and will provide the Committee with eight options. The Committee, whic...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

Members of the Isle of Palms City Council Public Safety Committee will soon review alternatives for restriping the IOP Connector bridge. Eventually, the Committee will present three options for the community at large to consider.

Public Safety Chair Jan Anderson reported at the Council’s June 28 meeting that the South Carolina Department of Transportation is nearing completion of Phase 1 of its study of the bridge and will provide the Committee with eight options. The Committee, which also includes Rusty Streetman and Blair Hahn, will choose three alternatives “for community review,” Anderson said, adding that she hopes to have a final plan by the fall.

Without input from the city, SCDOT restriped the bridge in March 2021, adding bike and pedestrian lanes on each side and reduced the center emergency lane from 10 feet to 4 feet, drawing the ire of several Council members and a large number of IOP residents as well.

Phase 2 of SCDOT’s study, now in its preliminary stages, will address traffic congestion on the Connector and the roads that feed into it, including Highway 17, Palm Boulevard, Rifle Range Road and Hungryneck Boulevard, along with the island’s hurricane evacuation plan.

In a related matter, a divided Council narrowly approved a motion to hire an attorney to review the constitutionality of two related issues: the restriping of the Connector and S. 40, legislation signed into law by Gov. Henry McMaster in May 2021 that permits municipalities to charge for parking on state roads, but only with approval from the Department of Transportation. Sponsored by State Sen. Larry Grooms, the bill was heralded by the Charleston Beach Foundation, a group that was formed after IOP denied non-residents access to the island during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The motion to hire an attorney, considered after the Council emerged from executive session, was supported by Mayor Phillip Pounds, Anderson, Streetman, Kevin Popson and Jimmy Ward, while Hahn, Scott Pierce, Katie Miars and John Bogosian voted no.

Hahn later explained that he voted against the measure not because he doesn’t favor challenging the constitutionality of S. 40 and the restriping of the bridge, but because he “did not like the lawyer Brent found.”

IOP City Attorney Brent Halversen asked the Council to hire Miller Shealy, a professor at the Charleston School of Law. Shealy also has served in a solicitor’s office, in the office of the Attorney General of South Carolina and in the U.S. Department of Justice.

“I very much am in favor of giving Council what they need to understand the gravity of the situation,” Hahn added. “All of us want to hire a lawyer. This was about which lawyer to hire.”

In other action on June 28, the Council passed first reading of an ordinance that would put a referendum on the November ballot, asking residents if they would like to reduce the size of the Council from nine to seven members. There were three no votes, from Anderson, Ward and Popson. Ward said he would prefer to have the referendum originate from the voters rather than from the Council.

The Council also voted to extend the temporary suspension of enforcement of the plastic ban for businesses that have been impacted by supply chain issues. No business will be able to provide its customers with single use plastic bags at the point of sale. Ward, Miars and Pierce voted no.

Message From The Isle Of Palms Mayor: July 2022

Happy Fourth of July! I hope you’re planning to take part in the golf cart parade and our fireworks show. On Monday, July 4, the parade starts at 10 a.m. at 4th Avenue and Charleston Boulevard with setup starting at 9 a.m. Fireworks start at 9 p.m. at Front Beach.Ever wonder how fireworks got associated with the July 4 holiday? The first fireworks were used as early as 200 B.C. The tradition of setting off fireworks on the Fourth of July began in Philadelphia on July 4, 1777, during the first organized celebration of Independenc...

Happy Fourth of July! I hope you’re planning to take part in the golf cart parade and our fireworks show. On Monday, July 4, the parade starts at 10 a.m. at 4th Avenue and Charleston Boulevard with setup starting at 9 a.m. Fireworks start at 9 p.m. at Front Beach.

Ever wonder how fireworks got associated with the July 4 holiday? The first fireworks were used as early as 200 B.C. The tradition of setting off fireworks on the Fourth of July began in Philadelphia on July 4, 1777, during the first organized celebration of Independence Day. Ship’s cannon fired a 13-gun salute in honor of the 13 colonies. The Pennsylvania Evening Post reported: “at night there was a grand exhibition of fireworks (which began and concluded with 13 rockets) on the Commons, and the city was beautifully illuminated.” That same night, the Sons of Liberty set off fireworks over Boston Common. The tradition of patriotic celebration became even more widespread after the War of 1812, in which the United States again faced Great Britain. In 1870, the U.S. Congress made July 4 a federal holiday; in 1941, the provision was expanded to grant a paid holiday to all federal employees.

What’s the Latest?

Drainage –

Construction of two of three major projects – the outfalls at 30th and 36th avenues – has begun. This project will significantly help our stormwater runoff management. This work will disrupt part of the Harbor Golf Course through the end of June and require road closures in August for Waterway and 30th and in October for Waterway and 36th. We will be posting notices to our residents in these areas and via social media and the Island Eye as we get closer to these dates.

These road closures were scheduled intentionally to avoid peak summer crowds. Also, since we are in hurricane season, our contractor is aware of our needs should an evacuation arise and provisions will be made to cover any open road areas in the event of an evacuation.

Underground Utility Conversion –

The city has been working with Dominion Energy to identify areas we can move the overhead utility lines underground during the next few years.

The first project will be at 21st and Palm Blvd. and construction is scheduled for Fall/Winter 2022. We have other undergrounding projects scheduled for the near future and we will update you as we make progress on those.

Comprehensive Drainage Master Plan –

The next phase(s) of our drainage work is still scheduled to be completed by year end. Our vendor is conducting an island wide review to identify and plan for improvements in high priority areas.

Rec Center –

We are seeking proposals from interested bidders for the construction of improvements to the outdoor basketball courts and a new pickleball court.

Proposals are due to the city by early July with construction planned for this Fall.

Marina –

Lots happening at our Marina! The Islander 71 is open, and the crowds are large and the views are great! Also, I hope you have had a chance to use the new public dock or take part in the Explorer Series for Residents. In partnership with Coastal Expeditions, we have developed a series of six itineraries exclusively for Isle of Palms residents. Learn more about the place you call home and how to enjoyably explore it on your own. The outings depart from the new IOP Public Dock at the Marina. Reservations are on a first-come, firstserved basis, and each is limited to 15 participants.

These will be free for IOP residents. Residents will be expected to show proof of residency or proof of ownership upon arrival. The dates for additional outings will be released this month. More details are available at iop.net.

You may recall the city received a letter requestingapproval of assignment of the existing leases held by Marina Joint Ventures, Inc. and Marina Outpost, LLC with the city of Isle of Palms to Morgan Creek LLC, same ownership group that owns Bohicket, Old Village Yacht Club, St. Johns Yacht Harbor and Seabreeze marinas. We continue to have discussions and review due diligence information with the potential new marina operator.

Since any assignment requires the city’s prior consent, we have begun our due diligence review process and arehopeful to have this process completed soon.

SCDOT –

1) We requested SCDOT add a camera to their 511 system at Palm Boulevard and 14th Avenue. Our camera pointing toward the IOP Connector bridge has been a part of the system for some time. The recent addition will allow you to view down Palm Boulevard towards 21st Avenue. Hopefully, this will help as you plan you trips around and off the island more efficiently.

2) The study being done on the bridge is progressing well. SCDOT’s consultant continues to collect traffic counts and observe traffic flows during our peak season. They are still on target to come back in the fall with recommendations for alternative bridge configurations.

Upcoming Events

July 4 – Parade at 10 a.m. starting at 4th Avenue and Charleston and Fireworks at 9 p.m. at Front Beach.

July 21 – Farmers market at Rec Center.

July 23 – IOP Beach Run.

July 29 – Coffee with the Mayor – At 9 a.m. on the last Friday of every month, I am hosting coffee with residents who wish to talk about city projects, issues and concerns. To support local businesses, the locations will rotate around venues on our island – however, during our busy season, we will host this at City Hall, second floor or the Rec Center.

You can find information for upcoming meetings on the IOP website Calendar (IOP.net) under Upcoming Events.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve! See you around the island.

Phillip Pounds, Mayor

843-252-5359

ppounds@iop.net

Your email address will not be published.

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THE LIST: 4th of July celebrations happening in the Lowcountry

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Special events around the Independence Day weekend will give you the chance to show off your patriotism and celebrate America’s 246th birthday.Here is a list of area celebrations and how you can take part:CharlestonOn the 4th of July, the Charleston RiverDogs will play a home game at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park the first time since 2018. First pitch is 6:35pm followed by the largest fireworks show of the season set to a medley of All-American musicFolly BeachOn Monday, July ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Special events around the Independence Day weekend will give you the chance to show off your patriotism and celebrate America’s 246th birthday.

Here is a list of area celebrations and how you can take part:

Charleston

On the 4th of July, the Charleston RiverDogs will play a home game at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park the first time since 2018. First pitch is 6:35pm followed by the largest fireworks show of the season set to a medley of All-American music

Folly Beach

On Monday, July 4, 2022, Folly Beach will celebrate with a huge fireworks display hosted by the Folly Association of Business (FAB). Locals and visitors of all ages are invited to enjoy the show, which will start at sundown around 9 p.m. and be visible from anywhere on Folly Beach and for miles around.

The pyrotechnics will be launched from 3rd Block West. The parking area and the beach area at 3rd Block West will be closed to visitors from 10am until 11pm. A beach sweep will be conducted immediately following the show to retrieve debris.

Folly Beach asks all guests to be conscious of beaches, streets, and wildlife and remove all trash. Plans are subject to change due to inclement weather. Keep an eye on VisitFolly.com and social media for updates.

North Charleston

North Charleston holds its 4th of July Festival from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. on July 4 at Riverfront Park. The city touts its Independence Day event as the Lowcountry’s largest July 4 fireworks show.

Fireworks will begin at dark and the event will include music by the North Charleston Pops! and DJ Natty Heavy.

The show is free to the public with all general admission for attendees. No one will be allowed into the park, however, until 5 p.m. and all bags will be searched.

Be sure to bring lawn chairs and blankets (as no seating is provided) as well as water and snacks. Grills will not be allowed in the park during the festival. No sparklers or outside fireworks will be permitted.

Parking is free; Enter the former Navy Base via McMillan or Virginia Avenues.

Walking, biking, carpooling and ridesharing are encouraged.

Food trucks for the event include:

For more information, visit the city’s website.

Isle of Palms

The Isle of Palms will host a fireworks show on July 4 at 9 p.m. at the Front Beach area.

The area of the beach between 21st Avenue to 13th Avenue at Sea Cabins will close at 6 p.m. for the setup and preparation of the fireworks show, which is sponsored by the city.

Beachgoers must take their family and belongings off this area of the beach at 6 p.m.

But they may remain inside the Isle of Palms County Park area, or behind the restroom facilities to watch the show.

Fireworks are strictly prohibited at the City of Isle of Palms.

Patriots Point

The Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum is offering access to the U.S.S. Yorktown’s flight deck during its 4th of July Fireworks Blast. The annual celebration returns after a three-year hiatus.

Tickets cost $25 and are on sale at the event’s Eventbrite page. Online orders will be limited to six tickets per person. Those tickets cannot be resold. Flight deck capacity is limited and tickets are expected to sell out quickly.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lawn chairs for flight deck seating. Personal food, drinks, and alcohol will not be permitted, nor will they be sold, on the flight deck.

However, each ticket comes with a complimentary bottle of water and local vendor King of Pops will sell gourmet popsicles.

There will be 15 landside food trucks selling tasty dishes before the show begins. Access to the flight deck will open to those with tickets at 7:30 p.m. and close at the conclusion of the fireworks show.

Parking is limited, not guaranteed, and will cost $20. Guests should plan to arrive early.

In addition to the flight deck option on July 4, guests are invited to a free party landside of the historic World War II aircraft carrier USS Yorktown. This will include live music, access to more than a dozen food trucks and a fireworks show above Charleston Harbor after sundown.

Goose Creek

The city of Goose Creek’s annual Fourth of July Celebration is scheduled for July 4 at 6:30 p.m. The event features live music, food vendors and kid’s activities.

Alcohol and outside fireworks are prohibited. Admission and parking are free.

The city has a scheduled rain date of July 9 for the event.

Summerville

The town of Summerville announced it has canceled its Fireworks and Freedom Festival that was scheduled at Gahagan Park.

As of Monday afternoon, a makeup date has not yet been announced.

Moncks Corner

The town of Moncks Corner is hosting their 4th of July celebration on July 2 at the Regional Recreation Complex.

The free event begins at 6 p.m. Saturday.

The event features:

Fireworks will begin at dusk.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

9 Best Small Towns to Live in the Carolinas

If you're looking for a small town to call home in the Carolinas, you can't go wrong with any of these nine charming communities. From the historic streets of Beaufort to the sunny beaches of Sullivan's Island, each of these towns has its own unique appeal. And with a variety of shops, restaurants, and outdoor activities to enjoy, you'll never find yourself bored in any of these delightful places.Waxhaw, NC ...

If you're looking for a small town to call home in the Carolinas, you can't go wrong with any of these nine charming communities. From the historic streets of Beaufort to the sunny beaches of Sullivan's Island, each of these towns has its own unique appeal. And with a variety of shops, restaurants, and outdoor activities to enjoy, you'll never find yourself bored in any of these delightful places.

Waxhaw, NC

Nestled in the heart of Union County, Waxhaw is a remarkable small town with a population of just over 16,000 people. This picturesque community is known for its beautiful historic homes, brick-lined streets, and friendly Southern hospitality. With its close proximity to Charlotte, Waxhaw is the perfect place to call home for those who want to experience all the benefits of city living while still enjoying the peace and quiet of a small town.

Summerville, SC

With its idyllic setting and friendly Southern charm, it's no wonder that Summerville has been nicknamed the "Flowertown in the Pines." This picturesque small town, which is located just 30 minutes from Charleston, is home to more than 53,000 people. Summerville is known for its beautiful parks and gardens, as well as its variety of shops and restaurants. And with a number of annual festivals and events, there's always something going on in this lively community.

Pinehurst, NC

Pinehurst is a historic small town located in the heart of North Carolina's sandhills region. This charming community is home to just over 16,000 people and is known for its beautiful pine trees and golf courses. In fact, Pinehurst is home to some championship golf courses, making it a haven for golf enthusiasts from all over the world. If you're looking for a small town with a relaxing and laid-back atmosphere, Pinehurst is the perfect place for you.

Aiken, SC

Aiken is a small city with a lot to offer. Located in the heart of South Carolina's horse country, Aiken is home to more than 30,000 people. This historic community is known for its beautiful antebellum homes, as well as its lively downtown area, which features a variety of shops and restaurants. Aiken is also a popular destination for equestrians, as it is home to several world-class equestrian facilities.

Beaufort, SC

Beaufort is a small city with a big history. Located on the coast of South Carolina, Beaufort is home to more than 13,000 people. This historic community is known for its beautiful homes, as well as its scenic waterfront setting. Beaufort is also a popular destination for those who enjoy the outdoors, as it offers a variety of opportunities for fishing, boating, and kayaking.

Davidson, NC

Davidson is a small town with a big heart. Located just 25 minutes from Charlotte, IT is home to less than 13,000 people but is packed with charm. This vibrant community is known for its lively downtown area, which features a variety of shops and restaurants. Davidson College, a highly respected liberal arts school, also calls Davidson home. And with its close proximity to Lake Norman, residents of Davidson have plenty of opportunities to enjoy the great outdoors.

Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan's Island is a small island community located off the coast of South Carolina. This beautiful island is home to more than 2,100 people and is known for its sandy beaches, historic fortifications, and lush forests. Sullivan's Island is also a popular destination for birdwatchers, as it is home to a variety of unique and interesting bird species. If you're looking for a small town with a relaxed and laid-back atmosphere, Sullivan's Island is the perfect place for you.

Isle of Palms, SC

Isle of Palms is a small island village also located off the coast of South Carolina. This lovely island is home to more than 4,000 people and is known for its sandy beaches, golf courses, and luxury resorts. Isle of Palms is also a popular destination for nature lovers, as it features a variety of parks and nature trails.

Myrtle Beach, SC

Myrtle Beach is a small town located in South Carolina. It was voted the best small town to live in the Carolinas. Myrtle Beach is well known for its beautiful beaches, golf courses, and family-friendly attractions. With a population of just over 30,000, the town is home to several famous golf courses and is also known for Ripley's Aquarium, Broadway at the Beach, and Barefoot Landing, to name a few.

Myrtle Beach is a great place to live if you're looking for a small town with a lot to offer.

In Summary

If you’re looking for a small town to call home in the Carolinas, you can’t go wrong with any of these nine charming communities. With a variety of shops, restaurants, and outdoor activities to enjoy, you’ll never find yourself bored in any of these delightful places. So, what are you waiting for? Start exploring today! Do you have any tips or tricks for living in a small town? Let us know in the comments below!

Isle Of Palms Short-term Rentals Could See Occupancy Caps, License Limits

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe Isle of Palms Planning Commission has determined that the city should limit the number of short term rental licenses it issues on parts of the island, but not for the high-priced properties along the beach. Following a year-long study, the Commission presented its findings to the City Council on June 21. The Council is expected to take an in-depth look at the recommendations at its July 12 workshop, according to Mayor Phillip Pounds. If the Council takes the Planning Commission’s advic...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The Isle of Palms Planning Commission has determined that the city should limit the number of short term rental licenses it issues on parts of the island, but not for the high-priced properties along the beach. Following a year-long study, the Commission presented its findings to the City Council on June 21. The Council is expected to take an in-depth look at the recommendations at its July 12 workshop, according to Mayor Phillip Pounds. If the Council takes the Planning Commission’s advice, the cap will be set at 10% above the number of licenses issued in 2020 in three areas: the homes southwest of the IOP Connector along Palm Boulevard – Zone 1; the neighborhoods northeast of the Connector and north of the houses along Palm Boulevard – Zone 2; and most of Wild Dunes and the areas west of Wild Dunes – Zone 3. According to Director of Building, Planning and Zoning Douglas Kerr, the recommendations don’t apply to areas where more than 25% of the properties already are rented, which includes Palm Boulevard between 21st and 41st Avenues, south of Palm Boulevard from 41st to 57th Avenues and Palmetto Boulevard inside Wild Dunes.

Commercial and multifamily properties would be exempt as well. “The data shows that the rentals on the island are migrating away from the beach and into the areas on the back side of the island,” Kerr said. “Residents in these areas are concerned that their neighborhoods could be changed if this trend is allowed to continue unchecked.” Kerr further explained that members of the Planning Commission felt that a cap would be unnecessary along the beach, “because the numbers of rentals in these areas is reducing due to market pressure, and these areas have traditionally had a high percentage of properties in the rental program and owners are accustomed to having rentals within their neighborhood.” In 2020, out of 1,414 shortterm rentals,1,057 were in the uncapped area; 71 in zone 1; 134 in zone 2; and 152 in zone 3. There currently are 1,417 short-term rental licenses on the entire island, which is down from a high of 1,597 in 2012. The license year goes from May to May, Kerr pointed out. Among properties that are no longer rentals, 80% are now primary homes, City Administrator Desiree Fragoso told Council members at their June 21 meeting. The Planning Commission also is recommending that if a home is sold, the buyer will have the opportunity to purchase a shortterm rental license and that occupancy limits be set at eight in capped areas and reduced to 12 in uncapped areas if a home ceases to be a rental for at least a year and later becomes a rental. Daytime limits would be twice the nighttime limits. Kerr explained that rental homes that were grandfathered in when the city set the occupancy limit at 12 have a higher limit, but, in any case, the city doesn’t permit gatherings of more than 40 at any rental home. The Planning Commission alsohas suggested that those who have short-term rental licenses must take in at least $3,000 a year to maintain those licenses. Kerr said current owners of rental homes probably won’t losetheir licenses – at least not right away. “Not immediately, but there is a part of the recommendation that would revoke a license for a property that is not rented at all or marketed for rental,” Kerr said. “So if an owner has a license but has no intention of renting, they could lose their license.” Pounds pointed out that the Council is in no rush to make a decision on the Planning Commission’s recommendations.He said he hopes to hear from Brumby McLeod – an associate professor at the College of Charleston School of Business and a research fellow with the Office of Tourism Analysis and the Riley Center for Livable Communities – at the Council’s upcoming workshop.

“We’re going to have him talk about what he has seen all around the country,” Pounds added. “I know we are a unique community, but he’s been involved all around the country in putting together ordinances. I think it would be worthwhile to hear from him.”

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