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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Jefferson, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Jefferson:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Jefferson, SC

Razorbacks’ KJ Jefferson Has More Motivation

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Arkansas quarterback KJ Jefferson thrives off being snubbed.Now he's got another one after being absent from any mention of All-SEC voting at SEC Media Days this week.The Razorbacks did have center Ricky Stromberg and safety Jalen Catalon named to the first time, but that's it.That's interesting primarily because the Hogs were tabbed third in the SEC West. Because it's selected by media folks in Atlanta mostly interviewing each other this week Alabama and Georgia dominated the voting.Lin...

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Arkansas quarterback KJ Jefferson thrives off being snubbed.

Now he's got another one after being absent from any mention of All-SEC voting at SEC Media Days this week.

The Razorbacks did have center Ricky Stromberg and safety Jalen Catalon named to the first time, but that's it.

That's interesting primarily because the Hogs were tabbed third in the SEC West. Because it's selected by media folks in Atlanta mostly interviewing each other this week Alabama and Georgia dominated the voting.

Linebacker Bumper Pool and offensive lineman Brady Latham were named to the second and third teams, respectively.

Stromberg, who earned first-team honors at center, anchored Arkansas’ offensive line last season, starting all 13 games and blocking for an offense that led all Power 5 schools in rushing with an average of 227.8 yards per game.

Behind his blocking, four Razorbacks rushed for at least 500 yards in 2021, a feat not been accomplished at Arkansas since 1975.

Stromberg totaled 873 snaps at center on the year, allowing only three sacks and getting penalized just eight times all season.

He was part of an offensive line that blocked for three games of 300+ yards of rushing (Texas, Ole Miss and Penn State) and two games of 600+ yards of total offense (Georgia Southern and Ole Miss).

Catalon, who carded first-team praise at defensive back, remains one of the nation’s top defensive backs despite missing most of last year due to a season-ending injury.

He finished eighth on the team in total tackles (46) with 1.5 tackles for loss despite playing in only six games. His four pass breakups tied for third most on the Razorbacks.

Pool earned second-team honors at linebacker. He led the Hogs in total tackles with 125 (45 solo), his second consecutive season with 100+ total tackles.

Pool is one of college football’s premier tackling machines, totaling the second-most stops (320) among all FBS defenders since 2019, and enters the 2022 campaign with 349 career tackles — ninth most all-time at Arkansas — to his name.

Latham, who grabbed third-team recognition on the offensive line, started all 13 games, lining up primarily at left guard.

He played 890 snaps and held an 81.7 pass blocking grade throughout the season, posting seven games with a pass blocking grade of 80.0 or higher according to Pro Football Focus.

Blocking alongside Stromberg, he helped lead the way for four Hogs to rush for at least 500 yards.

The Razorbacks, meanwhile, were picked to finish third in the SEC West, receiving one first-place vote.

Under head coach Sam Pittman, Arkansas won nine games in 2021, including all three of the program’s trophy games for the first time in history in addition to the Outback Bowl.

The Hogs rose as high as No. 8 in the AP poll, the highest ranking since 2011, and finished No. 21 in the final College Football Playoff rankings, tying Arkansas’ highest-ever ranking from the committee and marking ithe first time finishing the season in the Top 25 since the CFP’s inception in 2014.

Arkansas kicks off the season at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, against Cincinnati on ESPN.

SEC PRESEASON MEDIA POLL

EASTERN DIVISION

WESTERN DIVISION

SEC CHAMPION

Alabama

2022 PRESEASON MEDIA DAYS ALL-SEC TEAM

OFFENSE

First-Team

QB – Bryce Young, Alabama

RB - Tank Bigsby, Auburn

RB – Jahmyr Gibbs, Alabama

WR - Kayshon Boutte, LSU

WR - Jermaine Burton, Alabama

TE - Brock Bowers, Georgia

OL - Emil Ekiyor Jr., Alabama

OL - Warren McClendon, Georgia

OL - O'Cyrus Torrence, Florida

OL - Nick Broeker, Ole Miss

C - Ricky Stromberg, Arkansas

Second-Team

QB – Hendon Hooker, Tennessee

RB - Chris Rodriguez Jr., Kentucky

RB - Devon Achane, Texas A&M

WR - Cedric Tillman, Tennessee

WR - Jonathan Mingo, Ole Miss

TE - Cameron Latu, Alabama

OL - Layden Robinson, Texas A&M

OL - Kenneth Horsey, Kentucky

OL - Darnell Wright, Tennessee

OL - Javion Cohen, Alabama

C - Sedrick Van Pran, Georgia

Third-Team

QB – Will Levis, Kentucky

RB - Zach Evans, Ole Miss

RB - Kenny McIntosh, Georgia

WR - Ainias Smith, Texas A&M

WR - Josh Vann, South Carolina

TE - Jaheim Bell, South Carolina

OL - Brady Latham, Arkansas

OL - Tyler Steen, Alabama

OL - Javon Foster, Missouri

*OL - Jeremy James, Ole Miss

*OL – Kendall Randolph, Alabama

C - Cooper Mays, Tennessee

DEFENSE

First-Team

DL - Jalen Carter, Georgia

DL - BJ Ojulari, LSU

DL - Derick Hall, Auburn

DL - Byron Young, Tennessee

LB - Will Anderson Jr., Alabama

LB - Nolan Smith, Georgia

LB - Henry To'oTo'o, Alabama

DB - Jordan Battle, Alabama

DB - Kelee Ringo, Georgia

DB - Eli Ricks, Alabama

DB - Jalen Catalon, Arkansas

Second-Team

DL - Zacch Pickens, South Carolina

DL - D.J. Dale, Alabama

DL - Ali Gaye, LSU

DL - Colby Wooden, Auburn

LB - Bumper Pool, Arkansas

LB - Dallas Turner, Alabama

LB - Brenton Cox Jr., Florida

DB – Cam Smith, South Carolina

DB - Antonio Johnson, Texas A&M

DB - Christopher Smith, Georgia

DB - Emmanuel Forbes, Mississippi State

Third-Team

DL - Gervon Dexter, Florida

DL - Justin Eboigbe, Alabama

DL - Maason Smith, LSU

DL - McKinnley Jackson, Texas A&M

LB - Owen Pappoe, Auburn

LB - Ventrell Miller, Florida

LB - Jeremy Banks, Tennessee

DB - Kool-Aid McKinstry, Alabama

DB - Trey Dean III, Florida

DB - Trevon Flowers, Tennessee

DB - Malachi Moore, Alabama

SPECIALISTS

First-Team

P - Nik Constantinou, Texas A&M

PK - Will Reichard, Alabama

RS - Kearis Jackson, Georgia

AP - Jahmyr Gibbs, Alabama

Second-Team

P - Oscar Chapman, Auburn

PK - Anders Carlson, Auburn

RS - Ainias Smith, Texas A&M

AP - Devon Achane, Texas A&M

Third-Team

P - Paxton Brooks, Tennessee

PK - Harrison Mevis, Missouri

RS - JoJo Earle, Alabama

AP - Ainias Smith, Texas A&M

* - Indicates a tie

Information from Arkansas Communications is included in this story.

HOGS FEED:

WITHOUT SABAN AND FISHER FEUDING AND NO NEW TEAMS, MEDIA DAYS WAS RATHER ROUTINE

OLE MISS HAS MUCH SMOOTHER SCHEDULE THAN RAZORBACKS THIS YEAR

ALL-AMERICAN SAFETY JALEN CATALON ON INJURY LAST YEAR, LOOKING AHEAD TO SEASON

HOGS' BUMPER POOL ON COMING BACK FOR BONUS SEASON TO LEAVE PROGRAM BETTER

SECMD22: RAZORBACKS QUARTERBACK KJ JEFFERSON ON GETTING BETTER

RAZORBACKS' SAM PITTMAN SHOWS HE'S RELATABLE TO FANS ONCE AGAIN

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Second Blind Soccer Talent ID Camp Held in South Carolina

Coaches and athletes from across the U.S. converged on Rock Hill, S.C., July 8-10, to take part in a blind soccer talent identification camp. The event was organized by the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) in conjunction with the Charlotte Independence Soccer Club. The camp consisted of three full days of training with two on-field sessions each day. Camp participants also attended the July 8 game between the Charlotte Independence and the Richmond Kickers.“As the newly-certified national governing body for bl...

Coaches and athletes from across the U.S. converged on Rock Hill, S.C., July 8-10, to take part in a blind soccer talent identification camp. The event was organized by the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) in conjunction with the Charlotte Independence Soccer Club. The camp consisted of three full days of training with two on-field sessions each day. Camp participants also attended the July 8 game between the Charlotte Independence and the Richmond Kickers.

“As the newly-certified national governing body for blind soccer in the U.S., we are fast-tracking our talent identification with camps around the country,” said USABA Program Director Kevin Brousard. “This camp in Rock Hill provided us with a good mix of experienced athletes from previous camps alongside some newcomers to the sport.”

Blind soccer is an adaptation of soccer for athletes with visual impairments. The sport is played in 60 countries and has become the fastest-growing Paralympic sport in the world. In January, the USABA received the highest level of certification from the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee to be the national governing body (NGB) for the Paralympic sport of blind soccer. Globally known as blind football, the sport has been part of the Paralympic Games program since 2004. The U.S. will be making its Paralympic debut as the host country of the Los Angeles 2028 Games and the camp in Rock Hill was an important step in identifying talented athletes for the first-ever USA Blind Soccer National Team to be named in October. The first international competition for the inaugural USA Blind Soccer Team will be this December in Guatemala at the IBSA Central American Championships.

Among the 12 athletes participating was three-time Paralympic track & field athlete David Brown (Chula Vista, Calif.). Brown was the 100-meter gold medalist at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games and was the first totally blind athlete to run under 11 seconds when he clocked 10.92 in 2014. Fil Wilkinson, director of community engagement for the Charlotte Independence and director of adult soccer for Rock Hill, was one of three coaches directing the camp.

For more information on how the game of blind soccer is played, visit https://www.usaba.org/sports/blind-soccer/paralympic-sport/ or watch video HERE.

Camp rosterNoah Beckman (Dublin, Ohio)David Brown (Chula Vista, Calif.)Kevin Brown (Falls Church, Va.)Ricardo Castaneda (Fort Worth, Texas)Meghan Grenda (Redlands, Calif.)Cody Kirchner (New Brunswick, N.J.)Jadyn Heilman (Oakland, Calif.)Alvaro Mora (Phoenix, Ariz.)Jasmine Murrell (Plainfield, N.J.)Jefferson Palacios (Baltimore, Md.)Ahmed Shareef (Staten Island, N.Y.)Casimir Werda (Novi, Mich.)

Coaches:Sheena Hager (Chicago, Ill.)Katie Smith (Columbus, Ohio)Philip Wilkinson (Charlotte, N.C.)

Jefferson feels underrated entering 2022

FAYETTEVILLE — Depending on the media outlet or the analyst, the standing varies for Arkansas quarterback KJ Jefferson among the best in the SEC.According to Pro Football Focus' Anthony Treash, Jefferson is not one of the four best quarterbacks in the conference. Alabama’s Bryce Young, South Carolina’s Spencer Rattler, Mississippi State’s Will Rogers and Kentucky’s Will Levis make up that group, according to Treash.SEC Network analyst Tim Tebow, the 2007 Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback at Florid...

FAYETTEVILLE — Depending on the media outlet or the analyst, the standing varies for Arkansas quarterback KJ Jefferson among the best in the SEC.

According to Pro Football Focus' Anthony Treash, Jefferson is not one of the four best quarterbacks in the conference. Alabama’s Bryce Young, South Carolina’s Spencer Rattler, Mississippi State’s Will Rogers and Kentucky’s Will Levis make up that group, according to Treash.

SEC Network analyst Tim Tebow, the 2007 Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback at Florida, did not include Jefferson in his list of the five best SEC quarterbacks this week. Jordan Rodgers, who played at Vanderbilt, placed Jefferson fourth in his top five.

The Razorbacks’ second-year starter pays attention to preseason lists and projections. Arkansas coach Sam Pittman said this spring that Jefferson’s No. 14 ranking — out of 14 quarterbacks — by a media outlet last year was a motivator for him throughout the 2021 season.

This year he is not as concerned about what people say. But he does believe he is underrated in the conference.

“I am,” Jefferson said in an interview with SEC Network host Peter Burns on Wednesday at SEC Media Days in Atlanta. “I feel like I am, but, I mean, I don’t try to too much dwell on it. I mean, the only thing I’m worried about is playing ball and just getting back with my team and working.”

Jefferson finished last season with 2,676 passing yards, 21 touchdowns and 4 interceptions, and 664 yards rushing and 6 touchdowns.

Against Ole Miss he became the sixth quarterback in the SEC since 2000 to throw for three touchdowns and rush for three touchdowns in the same game. Two of the other five players — Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel and LSU’s Joe Burrow — won the Heisman Trophy.

Jefferson, in a way, compares his style of play to that of former Auburn quarterback Cam Newton, who won the Heisman Trophy in 2010.

“Just the swagger that he brings to the quarterback position,” Jefferson said. “I mean, there's nothing like it. That's what I bring.

“Coming from where I come from, I’ve always been doubted. Adding it as fuel to the fire and keeping it pushing just knowing that I can’t just keep dwelling on it and looking at it over and over again. The more I look at it my mind is not in the right spot and I need to be out there working.”

Razorbacks safety Jalen Catalon understands where the Newtown comparisons come from, but he believes Jefferson simply wants to be his own player.

“He wants to say I did it a mile away, for sure,” Catalon said. “But KJ is a team player. KJ always wants to make sure he's right himself so he can be right for us. He's always holding everybody accountable and (in) workouts when we do skills and drills and stuff like that.

“He’s a great quarterback, great leader. And like I said, I know that's my quarterback.”

Discussion

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Hogs’ KJ Jefferson Snubbed in All-SEC Voting by FanNation

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Arkansas quarterback KJ Jefferson has another bit of disrespect he can use for motivation.A lot of Razorback fans will feel the team as a whole did, too.In preseason voting among the FanNation on SI.com's SEC sites, the Hogs were picked to tie with Ole Miss for third place in the West, behind Texas A&M (2) and Alabama.Jefferson didn't make first or second-team lists.Center Ricky Stromberg, linebacker Bumper Pool and safety Jalen Catalon were the only Hogs on the first team.Cat...

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Arkansas quarterback KJ Jefferson has another bit of disrespect he can use for motivation.

A lot of Razorback fans will feel the team as a whole did, too.

In preseason voting among the FanNation on SI.com's SEC sites, the Hogs were picked to tie with Ole Miss for third place in the West, behind Texas A&M (2) and Alabama.

Jefferson didn't make first or second-team lists.

Center Ricky Stromberg, linebacker Bumper Pool and safety Jalen Catalon were the only Hogs on the first team.

Catalon was chosen as the extra player that helped determine the defensive alignment and positions chosen for the teams.

Sophomore kicker Cam Little was the second team kicker while linebacker Drew Sanders was on the defensive second team.

Alabama quarterback Bryce Young and linebacker Will Anderson Jr. were the preseason selections for offense and defensive players of the year honors.

The Tide also led the way in preseason All-SEC selections with 12, including eight first-team picks.

Georgia had the second-most selections with eight overall, including four first-team players. Arkansas and Texas A&M, which had the Special Teams Player of the Year choice with return specialist Ainias Smith, were tied for third with five overall selections and three first-team picks.

A couple of notable items about this year's selections:

• Instead of two running backs, three wide receivers were selected.

• Defensively, a 3-3-4 formation was used, but the 11th player was the one who received the most votes among remaining players. The idea was to reward the player most deserving and reflect that the majority of teams will be the nickel package more than their base defense this season.

• Ties were not broken. When one occurred on the first team an additional player was not added to the second team.

• Only one return specialist was named for first- and second-team status.

Every school in the SEC had at least one player receive votes.

QB: Bryce Young, Alabama; Will Rogers, Mississippi State

RB: Tank Bigsby, Auburn; Chris Rodriguez, Kentucky

WR: Cedric Tillman, Tennessee; Jonathan Mingo, Ole Miss

WR: Jermaine Burton, Alabama; Josh Vann, South Carolina

WR: Kayshon Boutte, LSU; Tyler Harrell, Alabama

TE: Brock Bowers, Georgia; Jaheim Bell, South Carolina

OL: Layden Robinson, Texas A&M; Nick Broeker, Ole Miss

OL: Broderick Jones, Georgia; Warren Erickson, Georgia

OL: Emil Ekiyor Jr., Alabama; Kenneth Horsey, Kentucky/Dylan Wonnum, South Carolina (tie for second-team)

OL: Javon Foster, Missouri/O’Cryus Torrence, Florida (tie for first-team)

C: Ricky Stromberg, Arkansas; Bryce Foster, Texas A&M/Sedrick Van Pran, Georgia (tie for second-team)

DL: Derick Hall, Auburn; Justin Eboigbe, Alabama

DL: Byron Young, Alabama; Mason Smith, LSU

DL: Jalen Carter, Georgia/Colby Wooden, Auburn (tie for first-team)

LB: Henry To’oTo’o, Alabama; Tryus Wheat, Mississippi State

LB: Will Anderson Jr., Alabama; Drew Sanders, Arkansas

LB: Bumber Pool, Arkansas; Nolan Smith, Georgia

DB: Cam Smith South Carolina; Trey Dean, Florida

DB: Eli Ricks, Alabama; Antonio Johnson, Texas A&M

DB: Jordan Battle, Alabama; Christopher Smith, Georgia

DB: Kelee Ringo, Georgia; Emmanuel Forbes, Mississippi State

Nickel/LB/DL: Jalen Catalon, Arkansas; BJ Ojulari/Ali Gaye LSU (tie second-team)

K: Harrison Mevis, Missouri; Will Reichard, Alabama/Cam Little, Arkansas (tie second-team)

P: Nik Constantinou, Texas A&M; Oscar Chapman, Auburn

PR/KR: Ainias Smith, Texas A&M; Jahmyr Gibbs, Alabama

Offensive: Bryce Young, Alabama

Defensive: Will Anderson Jr., Alabama

Special teams: Ainias Smith, Texas A&M

East

West

Predicted SEC Champion

Alabama Crimson Tide

HOGS FEED:

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Maryland School for the Blind graduate Jefferson Palacios working to make USA Blind Soccer National Team

In the first week of June, Jefferson Palacios signed up for a “Mortal Kombat” video game tournament for the July 8-10 weekend.Then the 2021 Maryland School for the Blind graduate was invited by the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) to try out on the same weekend for a chance to join the first Blind Soccer National Team. And the decision was simple.“It’s one of those things where, yeah, I wish [I could have played] because I know I would get pretty far in the tournament, but at the same ...

In the first week of June, Jefferson Palacios signed up for a “Mortal Kombat” video game tournament for the July 8-10 weekend.

Then the 2021 Maryland School for the Blind graduate was invited by the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) to try out on the same weekend for a chance to join the first Blind Soccer National Team. And the decision was simple.

“It’s one of those things where, yeah, I wish [I could have played] because I know I would get pretty far in the tournament, but at the same time, the biggest thing is my dream of representing the country,” he said. “That’s more important.”

So recently, Palacios, now majoring in recording arts at Full Sail University in Winter Park, Florida, joined 11 other players from around the country at what was described as an “identification camp” in Rock Hill, South Carolina, organized by the USABA in conjunction with the Charlotte Independence Soccer Club. Over the span of three days, the 12 players worked on drills, participated in scrimmages and showed off their skills before three coaches in hopes of being named in October to the national team that is scheduled to make its international debut in December at the International Blind Sports Federation’s Central American Championships in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Philip “Fil” Wilkinson, one of those three coaches and the director of community engagement for the Charlotte Independence, said Palacios made a favorable impression with him and his colleagues.

“He would be — at this moment in time — be very close to making the team, in my opinion,” Wilkinson said. “He obviously needs a little bit of work, but from the two camps that I’ve attended, he is definitely up there as a strong candidate for one of those 10 spots. He’s very close.”

Palacios’ performance did not surprise Maryland School for the Blind soccer coach Timothy Taylor, who said he has been encouraging Palacios to try out for the national team.

“I’ve been telling him, ‘This is an opportunity for you, you’re a very skilled athlete, and this is something that you should pursue,’” Taylor said. “So I definitely pushed him, but as a young adult, he’s got to make his own choices. But I’m very happy that he is doing this, and I am very pleased to hear that he is doing his best to try to make the team.”

Palacios’ opportunity is within his grasp despite eyesight problems that began at birth. He said he was born a few days premature with total blindness in his left eye.

Because of the premature nature of his birth, Palacios said he was placed in an incubator where prolonged exposure to oxygen and intense lights damaged his right eye.

Palacios said operations when he was 2 and 4 years old to counteract the damage done to his right eye proved ineffective. He said his vision began degrading when he was 6 to the point where he can only currently make out lights and shadows.

But Palacios was undeterred from trying to live his life as he wished. He began playing soccer with friends from the Baltimore neighborhood he grew up in and attended Lakeland Elementary School in Baltimore until the sixth grade.

“It was one of those things where you adapt and try to make things work,” he said.

When he graduated from elementary school, Palacios transferred to the Maryland School for the Blind in 2015. He said the transition “was pretty hard,” especially learning Braille, which he had not learned.

Sports proved to be an outlet. Palacios swam the 50- and 100-meter freestyle in and ran the 75, 200 and mile in track. But soccer is where he really stood out.

Taylor said the soccer program at the Maryland School for the Blind began as a club team in 2017 with Palacios among the five players. The following year, the program was elevated to varsity status with 10 players. Palacios played a starring role.

“Having a little bit of a soccer background from home, he picked it up right away and became a leader from the start,” Taylor said. “He went from a novice leading the team to a graduate leading the team and scoring goals.”

Blind soccer differs greatly from the game known by the general public. In blind soccer, matches feature teams playing five-on-five with four field players wearing eye shades and one sighted goalkeeper who can direct his teammates.

The ball is weighted with ball bearings that produce a jingling sound. Players are required to say, ‘Voy’ to alert players of their positions, and the ball can be played off sideboards that run along the sidelines.

Palacios said communication is “everything.”

“Everything is trusting your teammates and doing your part,” he said.

At the national team camp, Palacios admitted that he lacked that cohesion with his teammates. He said he tended to get too aggressive pursuing the ball and taking himself out of position.

A forward for much of his career at the Maryland School for the Blind, Palacios asked the national team coaches if he could switch to center back in his squad’s diamond formation, which fit his skills, according to Wilkinson.

“From his ability, he could pretty much play all the positions on the field,” he said. “But he was coming to the ball a little too much and not holding his shape and organization of the team’s formation and structure that we were implementing. He and I chatted a few times, and he asked me to try him more as a center back, and that allowed our goalkeeper to give him more instruction, and that gave him more information as to when he could approach the ball and what he needed to do when he had the ball.”

As of now, there are no more camps on the schedule before the October announcement of the national team’s roster. Palacios said he is working to fine-tune his ability to control the ball.

“I have to work and prove that I can make it,” he said. “We will know who makes it in October. So I can’t wait for that.”

Wilkinson said Palacios’ footwork with the ball could be enough to get him a spot on the national team.

“Tactical ability and guidance is something that we can work on, but he already has good technical ability with the ball at his feet,” he said. “He does well there, and that is huge. The tactical stuff comes down to the coaches’ and team’s ideas on how to play the game, and he is easy to coach. He started to pick up and understand those changes.”

Taylor, the Maryland School for the Blind coach, said it would be an honor for Palacios and the school if Palacios was named to the national team. That, Palacios said, is the ultimate objective.

“I want to represent the USA,” he said. “Ever since it started, I’ve wanted to be a part of this program. I even dropped swimming for it. It’s one of those things where you really push yourself to learn and work to represent your country.”

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