loading
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Johns Island, SC

Let's Talk!

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Johns Island:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

MUSC Health breaks ground on Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

The more than 20,000 square foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The Sea Islands community is expected to undergo significant population growth over the next few years, especially those residents 65 and older. The Sea Islands are also geographically isolated, situated more than 20 miles from the nearest hospital. The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.“It can take up to 45 minutes to get to th...

The more than 20,000 square foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The Sea Islands community is expected to undergo significant population growth over the next few years, especially those residents 65 and older. The Sea Islands are also geographically isolated, situated more than 20 miles from the nearest hospital. The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.

“It can take up to 45 minutes to get to the nearest hospital from the Sea Islands. That’s too long for an emergency situation such as a stroke, where every minute counts. As the state’s only comprehensive academic health system, we are committed to delivering the best possible care, closest to home,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This new medical pavilion will provide rapid access to outstanding care for the entire Sea Islands community.”

As part of the MUSC Health system’s overarching strategy, the MUSC Health Charleston Division has worked to provide better community access and local care in the greater Tri-County region, as well as coastal communities to the north and south of Charleston. This enables better capacity at the flagship facilities, which offer specialized and complex care downtown while enhancing overall accessibility and continuity of care for patients and families, especially in underserved communities. Since 2019, four new multispecialty ambulatory care platforms have opened in West Ashley, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant.

In addition to 24/7 emergency care, the facility will offer two trauma rooms, a rooftop helicopter pad, and a medical office building that will provide primary and specialty care, including imaging and lab services, cardiology and physical therapy. A telemedicine network will connect the entire facility to some of the nation’s top providers at MUSC Health in downtown Charleston. The Town of Kiawah Island donated $1 million to create a healing, restful green space and garden adjacent to the new facility.

“Accessibility to the wonderful health system and hospitals we have here has been a concern, so it was exciting to hear about this project,” said Town of Kiawah Mayor John Labriola. “My hat’s off to the MUSC Board of Trustees and the institution’s leadership, because getting a certificate of need is not easy… personally, I look forward to the ribbon cutting and seeing our garden that will be named for the Town of Kiawah.”

The project was made possible in part by Kiawah Partners, which was acquired by South Street Partners in 2013, who donated 6 acres of land to the Medical University Hospital Authority (MUSC Health), valued at $4.85 million.

"This project was initiated to meet the huge need for medical services on Kiawah Island, Seabrook, and Johns Island. With no convenient emergency healthcare options currently available, we have been working for seven-plus years to figure out a way to bring accessible healthcare to the Sea Islands,” said Chris Randolph, South Street Partners. “Thanks to MUSC, we will soon have a world-class medical facility that provides so much more than what we had originally envisioned. We couldn’t be more pleased to have been able to donate the land for this project and feel very grateful to partner with such an excellent health care system.”

Of the estimated $30 million needed to fund the project, MUSC is committed to raising $17 million in private support. To date, it has received more than $9.5 million in confirmed gifts, with many coming from local residents.

“Private support is critical to the long-term success of the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion because of the many financial challenges that come with operating a medical facility in this community,” said Kate Azizi, vice president for Institutional Advancement. “One challenge is the low population density of the Sea Islands. While this is an aging population that needs timely access to medical care – there aren’t enough people living in these communities full time to sustain our operations. Philanthropic support helps fill those gaps, allowing us to deliver the best care possible where and when it’s needed.”

Donors Chris and DeeDee Gibson are giving $2 million to the project. In recognition of their generosity, the physical therapy space will be named in their honor. “My family has been coming to Kiawah for close to 40 years,” Chris Gibson said. “When my wife DeeDee and I built a home here, she had one request: that there was a hospital nearby in case of an emergency. All these years later, we are excited to contribute to the new MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion and to help make these vital medical services available to our neighbors on Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands.”

“The construction of a full-fledged medical facility with emergency services is a dream come true for all Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook Islands,” said local resident Pam Harrington, who donated $2 million and will name the emergency department after the Harrington family. “As our population continues to grow and more folks are retiring to our area, the demand for medical services grows with it! Being a Kiawah/Cassique resident for many years, the addition of a medical pavilion fills a real need that has existed over several decades. Prior to my 40-plus years in real estate on the islands I was a practicing ICU nurse. This medical center is near and dear to my heart! As a thank you and show of appreciation to all who have been so supportive of my success, here, on the Sea Islands, it seems befitting to take this opportunity to give back in a meaningful way.”

Construction is expected to conclude in late 2023.

Quote bank:

Seabrook Mayor John Gregg – “It is indeed my pleasure to welcome MUSC to Seabrook Island, as our local community will be well served by the capabilities of this facility and the practitioners who will staff it. We look forward to having better availability of care, ranging from emergency room treatment, to advanced diagnostics for the ailments, bumps, pains, scrapes, stings, and strains that come with having an active and diverse population.”

MUSC Board of Trustees Vice Chairman Charles Schulze – “On behalf of the board, I want to acknowledge, commend, and deeply, deeply thank you for your dedication hard work and the public private collaboration that is taking place to get us to where we are today. As an air force veteran of the Vietnam war, I know the importance and necessity of teamwork. When you have a complex mission ahead of you in those situations, your unity as a team is your biggest strength… And it didn't matter where you live, where you were from or what your background was in our military. You learned that persistence, perseverance, collaboration, and expertise are critical to the success of a mission. And it's been no different in this case. When the board began to discuss the feasibility of this project, we knew it wasn't going to happen without teamwork and vision. Not only from everybody at MUSC, but also from the community here in the sea islands.”

MUSC Health System CEO and Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Dr. Pat Cawley – “What makes this project challenging is that it doesn’t fit into normal health constructs. We spent a lot of time with the community, trying to gauge what was needed and it was clear that there was tremendous community support for this project and it was the engagement with the concept of neighbors caring for neighbors and the work of the community to reach out to state officials and regulators that helped make this project a reality. MUSC Health is proud to be a part of this community and its health care provider of choice, and we are humbled by the level of support we are receiving to bring this shared vision to reality.”

Founded in 1824 in Charleston, MUSC is the state’s only comprehensive academic health system, with a unique mission to preserve and optimize human life in South Carolina through education, research and patient care. Each year, MUSC educates more than 3,000 students in six colleges – Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy – and trains more than 850 residents and fellows in its health system. MUSC brought in more than $327.6 million in research funds in fiscal year 2021, leading the state overall in research funding. MUSC also leads the state in federal and National Institutes of Health funding, with more than $220 million. For information on academic programs, visit web.musc.edu

As the health care system of the Medical University of South Carolina, MUSC Health is dedicated to delivering the highest quality and safest patient care while educating and training generations of outstanding health care providers and leaders to serve the people of South Carolina and beyond. Patient care is provided at 14 hospitals with approximately 2,500 beds and five additional hospital locations in development; more than 350 telehealth sites, with connectivity to patients’ homes; and nearly 750 care locations situated in all regions of South Carolina. In 2022, for the eighth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the No. 1 hospital in South Carolina. To learn more about clinical patient services, visit muschealth.org.

MUSC and its affiliates have collective annual budgets totaling $5.1 billion. The nearly 25,000 MUSC team members include world-class faculty, physicians, specialty providers, scientists, students, affiliates and care team members who deliver and support groundbreaking education, research, and patient care.

'We just needed it so badly': Celebrating groundbreaking for Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

DeeDee and Chris Gibson have spent time on Kiawah Island, about 25 miles south of Charleston, for about four decades. “DeeDee and I built a house here, and one request she had was that we had a hospital close by for emergency needs,” he said.But there wasn’t one. Now, thanks to the generosity of the Gibsons and other donors, that’s about to change. The mayors of Kiawah and Seabrook islands joined leaders from MUSC on Sept. 8 to break ground for the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.DeeDee Gibson, ...

DeeDee and Chris Gibson have spent time on Kiawah Island, about 25 miles south of Charleston, for about four decades. “DeeDee and I built a house here, and one request she had was that we had a hospital close by for emergency needs,” he said.

But there wasn’t one. Now, thanks to the generosity of the Gibsons and other donors, that’s about to change. The mayors of Kiawah and Seabrook islands joined leaders from MUSC on Sept. 8 to break ground for the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.

DeeDee Gibson, who with her husband contributed $2 million to the project, was on hand to see it. “I’m just glad to be a part of it. We just needed it so badly.”

The pavilion, on Seabrook Island Road near the Bohicket Marina, will serve Kiawah, Johns and Seabrook islands and the surrounding area. Pat Cawley, M.D., CEO of the MUSC Health system, said the goal is to bring health care to the people who need it. “We would establish this by providing a 24/7 emergency room, more primary care, more specialty care and all of this would be backed up by a world-class academic health system.”

Here’s a little more detail about the features Cawley mentioned. The free-standing Emergency Department will have a helipad for people who need to be flown to MUSC Health’s downtown Charleston hospital, four exam rooms, two trauma rooms and fast-track triage, along with X-ray, CT scan and lab services.

Other services in the medical pavilion will include:

David Cole, M.D., president of the Medical University of South Carolina, said the pavilion symbolizes the future health of the community and thanked everyone who helped make it possible.

“Your dedication to the health and wellness of this community will have an impact for generations to come. This marks a major milestone for this community and the many who will come after you and also the many who will serve here on a daily basis, certainly a beginning of a journey.”

That journey is possible due in part to the real estate investment firm South Street Partners. It donated the land for the medical pavilion and has strong ties to the area, including a luxury senior living site under development near the medical pavilion.

But the journey to this point hasn’t always been easy. Charles Schulze, chairman of the MUSC Board of Trustees, noted the time and effort that have gone into it.

“As an Air Force veteran of the Vietnam war, I know the importance and necessity of teamwork. When you have a complex mission ahead of you, in those situations, your unity as a team is your biggest strength. And it didn’t matter where you live, where you were from or what your background was in our military. You learned that persistence, perseverance, collaboration and expertise are critical to the success of a mission,” he said.

“And it’s been no different in this case. When the board began to discuss the feasibility of this project, we knew it wasn’t going to happen without teamwork and vision. Not only from everybody at MUSC, but also from the community here in the Sea Islands.”

Leaders of those islands were happy to help realize that vision. They thanked MUSC Health for bringing badly needed care to the area.

“We look forward to having better availability of care, ranging from emergency room treatment to advanced diagnostics for the ailments, bumps, pains, scrapes, stings and strains that come with having an active and diverse population,” said Mayor John Gregg of Seabrook Island.

Kiawah Mayor John Labriola said he also looked forward to seeing the healing, restful green space and garden adjacent to the new facility that his town donated $1 million for.

MUSC is still raising money to build the medical pavilion. Of the estimated $30 million needed, MUSC is committed to raising $17 million in private support. So far, it has more than $9.5 million in confirmed gifts, with many coming from local residents such as the Gibsons. They said it’s rewarding to be able to help.

“We’re really excited to be a part and contribute to MUSC and really look forward to having the medical needs for everybody on Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands,” Chris Gibson said.

Editorial: Time for a new joint planning push at the other end of Johns Island

We’ve long advocated for local governments to take a regional approach to planning. Cities and counties shouldn’t operate in a vacuum because their actions can impact their neighbors and result in incompatible plans.That idea came to mind as we read an Aug. 27 commentary about Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook islands. Seabrook Island resident Richard Wildermann ...

We’ve long advocated for local governments to take a regional approach to planning. Cities and counties shouldn’t operate in a vacuum because their actions can impact their neighbors and result in incompatible plans.

That idea came to mind as we read an Aug. 27 commentary about Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook islands. Seabrook Island resident Richard Wildermann wrote about the fresh series of new developments emerging near Freshfields Village, the unique shopping and dining complex that has long anchored the area where the three islands converge and where the four-lane Betsy Kerrison Parkway ends in a roundabout.

“A new proposal seems to pop up every few weeks. There is increasing concern on all three islands about the pace, scope and effects of these developments, and whether anyone is minding the store,” Mr. Wildermann wrote. “Who is looking out for what is in the best interests of the affected communities?”

If that question even has to be asked publicly, then the answer is probably no one. That should change.

Elected officials, neighborhood leaders and planners with Charleston County and the two beach towns should come up with a mutually agreed upon overlay for the area, one that would guide future development toward the kinds of uses — and the kinds of sizes and scale — residents of all three jurisdictions would most like to see. Such a joint planning effort would be a logical recognition of the islands’ growing popularity and their growing real estate pressures.

Ideally, this regional planning effort would have already happened, because the horse is at least partly out of the barn. There is a senior living facility under construction and a planned emergency medical facility nearby. There also are proposals for a self-storage building, a private club and more.

The original scope of Freshfields Village was ambitious and created all sorts of space for a grocery store as well as dozens of restaurants and shops and offices, but it seems increasingly clear that this complex is filling up. And the area’s continued growth and popularity are creating a demand for new, larger development next door, or not far away. As Mr. Wildermann noted, “More proposals will follow,” and “When evaluated together, the cumulative impacts could overwhelm our infrastructure, significantly harm the environment and be detrimental to our quality of life.”

The only way to address that concern is to plan more regionally and comprehensively.

A joint planning effort could consider whether commercial development in the greater Freshfields area should be concentrated at the commercial node on Seabrook Island around Freshfields or inch its way north on Betsy Kerrison; whether the towns should annex any of Johns Island; whether any of these local jurisdictions should consider future upzoning to allow for new, possibly more intense uses, and how new building there would affect the net traffic to and from Kiawah and Seabrook islands. Some new development there could reduce trips across Johns Island, as could more workforce housing in the area.

As with other instances where jurisdictions meet, things can get tricky. Freshfields Village is actually on Seabrook Island geographically, but it has been annexed by the town of Kiawah Island; the Bohicket Marina is on Johns Island, but it’s in the town of Seabrook Island.

Some might think of regional planning and conjure up major efforts such as the new “One Region Roadmap: Opportunities for All” plan that mapped out economic and governmental goals for the Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester metro region. Or perhaps the regional transportation planning effort done by Charleston Area Transportation Study Policy Committee. But regional planning also can entail smaller, more surgical cooperation between jurisdictions, such as the James Island Creek Task Force that formed to improve water quality.

In a sense, the regional planning we’re calling for is not unlike what unfolded years ago on the other end of Johns Island. Both the county and the city of Charleston have jurisdiction over the northern parts of the island that have seen more rapid suburban development. And they have worked jointly on an overlay for Maybank Highway as well as an urban growth boundary beyond which their zoning calls for more rural uses and larger lots sizes.

These planning efforts aren’t perfect. Despite the cooperation and coordination between the city and county of Charleston, many feel the island is building out too rapidly, particularly before its road networks and drainage systems are ready to handle the added growth. Certainly, the slow progress on improving Main Road from U.S. Highway 17 onto the island, as well as realizing the planned pitchfork improvements where Maybank enters the island, are frustrating points. And there is still very difficult work to be done to reconsider zoning there in light of rising seas and heavier rainfalls.

But just because such regional joint planning efforts alone are no silver bullet, that’s no excuse not to try. Indeed, the only other coherent response simply would be to throw up one’s hands in frustration. And that’s not an option.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Biden's new clean energy czar said he has the 'highest regard' for CCP official, called him 'friend'

A newly announced senior adviser to President Biden referred to a top Chinese Communist Party (CCP) official as his "friend" and took several phone calls from him between 2015 and 2016 while serving as the chairman for Hillary Clinton’s failed campaign, according to emails reviewed by Fox News Digital.Biden announced earlier this month that he was appointing John Podesta to serve as his senior adviser to the president for cl...

A newly announced senior adviser to President Biden referred to a top Chinese Communist Party (CCP) official as his "friend" and took several phone calls from him between 2015 and 2016 while serving as the chairman for Hillary Clinton’s failed campaign, according to emails reviewed by Fox News Digital.

Biden announced earlier this month that he was appointing John Podesta to serve as his senior adviser to the president for clean energy innovation and implementation, saying his "deep roots in climate and clean energy policy" will help the administration "hit the ground running" on pushing forward these policies. In this new role, Podesta will oversee approximately $370 billion in climate spending.

Four days after Podesta left the White House as a counselor to President Obama in February 2015, his assistant, Eryn Sepp, informed him that he would be receiving a call on his "house line" from Tung Chee-hwa, who has been serving as a vice chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) since the early 2000s. The CPPCC is the "key mechanism for multi-party cooperation and political consultation" under the leadership of the CCP, according to the CPPCC website.

A few weeks later, Sepp and one of Tung’s assistants exchanged emails to set up another call between Podesta and Tung in early March 2015, a month before Clinton would announce her candidacy.

HUNTER BIDEN SAID HE WOULD BE ‘HAPPY’ TO INTRODUCE BUSINESS ASSOCIATES TO TOP CCP OFFICIAL

In June 2015, Podesta said he had another call with Tung and asked Melanie Hart, then-director of China policy at the Center for American Progress (CAP), the think tank Podesta founded, for an update on who they had requested meetings with in China because he said that Tung could "probably be helpful."

Hart, who is currently Biden's China policy coordinator for the Office of the Undersecretary of State, listed two CCP officials and said she "shared the three names above with [Tung's] team so they are in the loop. We are also working to confirm a good slot for a breakfast or lunch meeting with you and [Tung]." "CH" in the email refers to Tung Chee-hwa.

In a September 2015 email to Alex Cherin, a partner at Englander Knabe & Allen, Podesta referred to Tung as his "friend from Hong Kong" whom he met with the week prior. Cherin's email communications with Podesta do not appear to be related to any of Podesta's emails regarding Tung or the China-U.S. Exchange Foundation (CUSEF), which Tung founded.

"Had dinner with him last Thursday," Podesta wrote.

Podesta and Tung also co-authored a paper for CAP in December 2013 that called for the strengthening of "major power relations" between the U.S. and China. In addition to Tung being a top official in the CPPCC, he also founded CUSEF, which has bankrolled several American universities, think tanks and nonprofit organizations, and has received increased scrutiny over the last few years for its activity with the CCP’s "united front" system, the sprawling Chinese Communist Party apparatus that conducts influence operations abroad, the Washington Free Beacon reported. Tung continues to be listed as chairman of the foundation on the organization’s website.

In May 2013, Tung and Podesta spoke at a luncheon hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), which included China’s ambassador to the United States, Cui Tiankai.

"For the last four years though, Center for American Progress and China-U.S. Exchange Foundation have co-hosted a US.-China track II dialogue and we continue to host these dialogues on an annual basis," Podesta said. "I have the highest regard for C.H. Tung's tireless efforts to bring our two nations closer together. He is always looking ahead to anticipate emerging challenges in the U.S.-China relations and to figure out what he can do to make those challenges more manageable."

Later during the event, Podesta walked up to the mic to introduce Tung and said he wanted to join all the people in the room for thanking Tung for his "leadership," prompting Tung to later thank Podesta for his "inspirational talk."

Podesta also had multiple calls with Tung during the latter part of 2015 and early 2016, including calls in July, August, September, January and March, according to Wikileaks emails reviewed by Fox News Digital. The Daily Caller reported that Podesta is currently sitting on the "U.S.-China 2022 Steering Committee" of CUSEF and has penned at least three pieces on CUSEF's website.

The failed Hillary Clinton campaign chairman isn’t the only Biden administration official with ties to Tung. Biden’s staff secretary, Neera Tanden, who formerly served as the president and CEO of CAP before joining the Biden administration, was also tied to CUSEF.

During a 2014 CAP event in Washington, D.C., that featured Tung as a speaker, Tanden highlighted how it had "become clear" that China and the United States were "interdependent" and said since 2008 CAP and CUSEF have organized five track II dialogues. Tanden mentioned Tung’s name twice during her opening remarks.

Later during the event, Tung praised CAP and said he was "delighted" to be back. He said it was in 2005 that he began exploring the "landscape in Washington" because he wanted to find a way to develop a relationship between the countries and found that CAP’s position on China-U.S. relations was the most "progressive" of the DC-based think tanks.

"You were thinking ahead of the curve of most of your peers and I was really impressed and you may have not known things then, but I was trying to court you and your colleagues, trying to work together with you," Tung said. "I’m delighted to be back at Center for American Progress."

He went on to say that the relationship between CAP and CUSEF has been "very, very fruitful" dialogue, adding that he is really excited that the dialogue is "reaching climax," referring to his appearance at the event and the high-level discussions they were having. He also alluded to Podesta without mentioning his name, saying, "We miss the other person who is the architect of all this, but he’s now – I’m afraid he has a better job to do, so he’s not with us today," referring to his role in the White House.

When reached for comment on whether the White House was concerned about ties between CUSEF/Tung and some of the aforementioned officials in the Biden White House, a White House official told Fox News Digital that "White House employees are required to step down from outside positions and he will have a two year recusal under the Pledge from all of his previous affiliations."

A CAP spokesperson told Fox News Digital, "The Center for American Progress is an independent, nonpartisan policy institute that is dedicated to improving the lives of all Americans. At no point has CAP funded research with CUSEF. CAP has engaged in dialogues with a variety of stakeholders, even where and as we may disagree, to try to work toward better outcomes for our country, our world, and our shared climate concerns. CAP strongly supports greater transparency regarding foreign government funding sources across all think tanks. In fact, CAP’s most recent China strategy calls for the Internal Revenue Service to incorporate foreign funding."

CUSEF didn't immediately respond to a Fox News Digital request for comment.

Tung’s CPPCC is a "central part" of China’s united front system, which works to "co-opt and neutralize sources of potential opposition to the policies and authority of its ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP)," according to a 2018 report by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, a U.S. government agency.

HUNTER BIDEN SAID HE WOULD BE ‘HAPPY’ TO INTRODUCE BUSINESS ASSOCIATES TO TOP CCP OFFICIAL

The CPPCC is "designed to liaise with non-Communist Party members – and ultimately see them work with the CCP to advance its interests," The Diplomat reported last year.

Fox News Digital reported last week that Hunter Biden allegedly sat at the same table as Tung during a welcoming dinner hosted by Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing in December 2013, which led to Hunter’s business associate, James Bulger, asking him if he could introduce Bohai Harvest RST (BHR) CEO Jonathan Li and BHR committee member, Andy Lu, to Tung.

"It is my understanding that during the trip to Beijing that you made with your father, President Xi hosted a welcome dinner," Bulger wrote. "[A]t that dinner, you were seated right next to Mr Tung, therefore J and Andy believe it would be very helpful if you could please send a brief email to Mr Tung laying out that you are a partner and Board Member of BHR and that You would be grateful to Mr Tung if he could meet your local partners to discuss the Fund."

"Please let me know if you can introduce these two to Mr Tung by email it is very important to our BHR intiative [sic] at this moment," Bulger stressed.

Hunter responded that he was "happy" to fulfill the request but said he couldn’t recall the names of the gentlemen who sat next to him at the dinner.

"Happy to do this," he wrote, "but I have no email address for Mr. Tung and he very well may have sat next to me but I don't recall the two gentlemen's names to my left and right. Regardless, I would suggest the team draft an email in Mandarin and English for my approval ASAP." None of the parties involved in the emails responded to previous requests for comment from Fox News Digital, so it is unclear if the introduction took place.

Fox News Digital's Haley Chi-Sing contributed to this report

Diamond Heels Welcome 19 Newcomers Into The Program

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – University of North Carolina head baseball coach Scott Forbes formally revealed North Carolina's 19-man signing class on Monday as the Diamond Heels continue into their second week of fall practice.The group is comprised of one graduate transfer, one division one transfer, three junior college transfers and 14 freshmen. Six newcomers hail from the Tar Heel state with an additional half-dozen players hailing...

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – University of North Carolina head baseball coach Scott Forbes formally revealed North Carolina's 19-man signing class on Monday as the Diamond Heels continue into their second week of fall practice.

The group is comprised of one graduate transfer, one division one transfer, three junior college transfers and 14 freshmen. Six newcomers hail from the Tar Heel state with an additional half-dozen players hailing from the southeastern United States.

"We are thrilled to welcome these young men to UNC," Forbes said. "They are a talented group and will be great additions to our baseball family not only as baseball players but also as young men."

Kevin Eaise, unanimously selected as the 2022 Ivy League Pitcher of the Year, joins the Diamond Heels from Penn for his graduate season. Former Vanderbilt southpaw Nelson Berkwich along with junior college All-America right-handed pitcher Jake Knapp (Walters State), Ben Peterson (Florida Southwestern State), and Matt Poston (Florence-Darlington Tech) arrive looking to bolster the pitching staff.

The freshman class is highlighted by three state Player of the Year recipients: Matthew Matthijs (North Carolina), Kyle Percival (South Carolina) and Will Simmons (South Dakota) along with the addition of Collegiate Baseball All-America second-team selection Austin Hawke and two-time Rowan County (N.C.) Player of the Year Cam Padgett.

The newcomers and the veteran Diamond Heels began fall practice on Sept. 1 and are engaged in a six-week, full squad practice through Oct. 14. The Tar Heels will play multiple intrasquad games while also hosting Walters State (Sept. 16) and Duke (Oct. 14) at Boshamer Stadium.

Carolina will hold its annual best two-of-three Fall World Series Oct. 3-4 with game three scheduled for Oct. 6, if necessary.

DIAMOND HEELS BASEBALL NEWCOMERS LHP Nelson Berkwich, Junior, Boca Raton, Fla. (Vanderbilt) OF Bryce Blaser, Freshman, Newport Beach, Calif. (Newport Harbor HS) RHP Michael Colonna, Freshman, Weddington, N.C. (Weddington HS) LHP Caleb Crain, Freshman, Forest City, N.C. (East Rutherford HS) RHP Kevin Eaise, Graduate, Monroeville, N.J. (Penn) OF Carter French, Freshman, Tampa, Fla. (Tampa Jesuit HS) INF Austin Hawke, Freshman, Oak Island, N.C. (Reagan HS) RHP Connor Hegan, Freshman, Neptune Beach, Fla. (Providence HS) UTY Jesse Jaconski, Freshman, Plymouth Meeting, Pa. (Plymouth Whitemarsh HS) RHP Jake Knapp, Junior, Greensboro, N.C. (Walters State) OF John Long, Freshman, St. Simons Island, Ga. (Glynn Academy) RHP Matthew Matthijs, Freshman, Greenville, N.C. (D.H. Conley HS) RHP Cameron Padgett, Salisbury, N.C. (East Rowan HS) LHP Kyle Percival, Lancaster, S.C. (Andrew Jackson HS) RHP Ben Peterson, Apex, N.C. (Florida Southwestern State) RHP Matt Poston, Junior, Hampton, S.C. (Florence-Darlington Tech) OF Jackson Rusiecki, Freshman, Marion, Conn. (Southington HS) RHP Will Simmons, Freshman, Sioux Falls, S.D. (Harrisburg HS) INF Jackson Van De Brake, Freshman, Yakima, Wash. (West Valley HS)

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.