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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Kershaw, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Kershaw:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Kershaw, SC

“Like a horror story on TV”: Locals react to 3.4 magnitude earthquake near Elgin

ELGIN, S.C. (WIS) - What scientists say is a rare earthquake swarm in the Midlands continued this weekend when a 3.4 magnitude earthquake centered near Elgin jolted thousands out of a sound sleep.The earthquake hit around 1:30 A.M. Sunday. It was followed by several smaller earthquakes, or aftershocks, in the same area.According to the South Carolina Emergency Management Division, there have now been mor...

ELGIN, S.C. (WIS) - What scientists say is a rare earthquake swarm in the Midlands continued this weekend when a 3.4 magnitude earthquake centered near Elgin jolted thousands out of a sound sleep.

The earthquake hit around 1:30 A.M. Sunday. It was followed by several smaller earthquakes, or aftershocks, in the same area.

According to the South Carolina Emergency Management Division, there have now been more than 30 earthquakes near Elgin since Christmas.

A 3.3 magnitude earthquake rumbled through the Midlands on May 9.

Many who live where these earthquakes are centered say this is quite jarring, especially when it happens in the middle of the night.

“It is terrible to feel something shaking you and you don’t know what it is,” Carmen L. Jackson, who lives near the earthquake’s epicenter, said. “I mean you’re in the bed and the bed’s shaking. Man, that’s like a horror story on TV.”

Dr. Scott White, Director of the of the South Carolina Seismic Network and a professor at the University of South Carolina’s School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment, said that while this activity is unusual, it is not abnormal for South Carolina or the Southeast, and these earthquakes should not be considered precursors to “the big one.”

“There’s nothing about this that suggests that the earthquakes are going to get any larger,” he said.

That is because, according to White, in the geological record there are almost never foreshocks, which are earthquakes that precede larger earthquakes in the same location. They can happen, but they are quite rare, he said.

Some said that this trend concerns them.

“It woke my wife up and she seldom wakes up in the middle of the night,” Steve Jones, longtime Elgin resident, said. “It was just a loud boom, and a lot of times living near Fort Jackson too you hear a lot of noise but experiencing that is totally different.”

Jones said this trend has been “strange,” but added, “We just live with it, it’s in God’s hands so trusting in him for it.”

Elisha Corrigan, who lives in Lugoff, said the earthquake this weekend was the most powerful one she has felt, and that it is “still scary every single time.”

“It’s strange because we’ve gone, you know, my whole life, I’ve lived here my whole life and have never had any experience with earthquakes and then all of a sudden now we’re having them daily, weekly, monthly,” she said.

White said that there is no clear reason why all this seismic activity is occurring, this area of Kershaw County is along an ancient fault system called the Eastern Piedmont Fault Zone.

“It’s probably the result of centuries of stress buildup along this Eastern Piedmont Fault system, and we get to live through kind of a special time right now where we’re seeing a lot of little earthquakes occurring along this fault system and hopefully this is the last one that we’ll see,” he said. “But Mother Nature works on her own rhythms and at her own pace and so it will end when it ends unfortunately.”

Jackson, who has lived in this area for four years, said this earthquake scared her “to death,” and she is hopeful that there will not be any others.

“I know there was an earthquake, but I had never felt nothing like that before in my life,” she said. “It was just so scary because when an earthquake happens, you don’t know when it’s going to happen and it was shaking my bed like a tree, and it shook all the glasses in my cabinet, but I couldn’t move. I didn’t get up.”

White says that while earthquakes are often measured in magnitude, another detail to consider is intensity. This measures the amount of shaking one may feel from an earthquake at any given location.

He said most of the earthquakes in the Elgin area have been about a 4 in terms of intensity. An intensity of 5 is when you could start to see loose objects fall, White said.

Copyright 2022 WIS. All rights reserved.

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High school baseball: With an enrollment of 197 students, Oklahoma school finishes No. 1 in top 25 small town rankings

Silo (Okla.) may be a small school in a small town, but its baseball team has some big-time credentials.Besides posting a 30-0 record and a 58-game win streak, Silo won its fifth straight spring state championship and has the winningest coach in high school baseball history. Silo also tops the MaxPreps list of the Top 25 small town baseball teams in the country.Consider that Silo is home to the nation's all-time winningest high school coach, Billy Jack Bowen. In spring and fall seasons combined, Bowen has 2,191 career wins in ...

Silo (Okla.) may be a small school in a small town, but its baseball team has some big-time credentials.

Besides posting a 30-0 record and a 58-game win streak, Silo won its fifth straight spring state championship and has the winningest coach in high school baseball history. Silo also tops the MaxPreps list of the Top 25 small town baseball teams in the country.

Consider that Silo is home to the nation's all-time winningest high school coach, Billy Jack Bowen. In spring and fall seasons combined, Bowen has 2,191 career wins in his 36 season. He's also won 22 state championships between the fall and spring season with his club winning both the fall and spring championship in the 2021-22 school year. The team takes a 58-game win streak — the second-longest active streak in the nation and the second longest in Oklahoma history — into next season. Silo has won 94 of the last 98 games it has played dating back to last spring.

With just over 500 people in the town of Silo, the school serves several small towns in the vicinity, but it still has just under 200 students in four grades. The Rebels edge out Randleman (N.C.), Sumrall (Miss.) and Sinton (Texas) for the No. 1 Small Town ranking based on its MaxPreps computer rating.

Randleman won the Class 2A state championship behind the play of catcher Brooks Bannon, a MaxPreps All-America selection who led the nation in home runs with 20. Sumrall, a MaxPreps National Champion in 2009 and 2010, won the Class 4A state championship this year, its sixth state title in school history. Sinton, meanwhile, won its first state championship in over 20 years in winning the Texas Class 4A title.

Teams qualify for the small town national rankings if they are from a school with less than 1,000 students and are part of a town that has a population of less than 10,000 people. Teams below are listed with their overall record, their MaxPreps computer rating and their postseason finish.

Top 25 small town high school baseball rankings1. Silo (Okla.)Record: 30-0 | Rating: 29.4Class 2A state champion

2. Randleman (N.C.)Record: 33-1 | Rating: 29.3Class 2A state champion

3. Sumrall (Miss.)Record: 35-1 | Rating: 28.8Class 4A state champion

4. Sinton (Texas)Record: 36-1 | Rating: 28.6Class 4A state champion

5. South Rowan (China Grove, N.C.)Record: 30-6 | Rating: 26.1Class 3A state champion

6. Central (Martinsburg, Pa.)Record: 27-0 | Rating: 26.0Class 3A state champion

7. Rosepine (La.)Record: 35-2 | Rating: 24.6Class 2A state champion

8. Eaton (Colo.)Record: 28-2 | Rating: 24.0Class 3A state champion

9. North Vermilion (Maurice, La.)Record: 37-4 | Rating: 23.9Class 4A state runner-up

10. Buchanan (Mich.)Record: 30-4 | Rating: 23.7Division 3 state champion

11. Long (Skipperville, Ala.)Record: 32-7 | Rating: 23.6Class 2A state champion

12. Roff (Okla.)Record: 29-3 | Rating: 23.5Class B state champion

13. Gunter (Texas)Record: 36-2 | Rating: 23.3Class 3A semifinalist

14. Chatham (N.Y.)Record: 25-0 | Rating: 23.1Class C state champion

15. Andrew Jackson (Kershaw, S.C.)Record: 33-2-1 | Rating: 23.1

Record: 20-0 | Rating: 22.9

Division 3 state champion

17. Brock (Texas)Record: 36-4 | Rating: 22.7Class 3A state runner-up

18. Holtville (Deatsville, Ala.)Record: 35-7 | Rating: 22.6Class 5A state runner-up

19. China Spring (Texas)Record: 32-9 | Rating: 22.5Class 4A semfinalist

20. East Union (Blue Springs, Miss.)Record: 29-4 | Rating: 22.1Class 2A state champion

21. Blanchard (Okla.)Record: 35-5 | Rating: 21.8Class 4A state champion

22. Perquimans (Hertford, N.C.)Record: 31-2 | Rating: 21.3Class 1A state champion

23. Oktaha (Okla.)Record: 30-8 | Rating: 21.3Class 2A state runner-up

24. Canute (Okla.)Record: 27-3 | Rating: 21.2Class 1A state runner-up

25. Pigeon Forge (Tenn.)Record: 39-4 | Rating: 21.1 Class AA state runner-up

Is this the reason there are so many earthquakes in Kershaw County?

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources released a report explaining how water might be playing a role in keeping earthquakes goingKERSHAW COUNTY, S.C. — A group of local seismologists thinks they may have narrowed down the cause of recent earthquakes in Kershaw County to the Wateree River.The theory, detailed in a new report issued Monday, has come together from geologists with the ...

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources released a report explaining how water might be playing a role in keeping earthquakes going

KERSHAW COUNTY, S.C. — A group of local seismologists thinks they may have narrowed down the cause of recent earthquakes in Kershaw County to the Wateree River.

The theory, detailed in a new report issued Monday, has come together from geologists with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, the University of South Carolina and the College of Charleston.

They believe the initial earthquake may have allowed water from the Wateree River to seep into new cracks that opened from the original December earthquake, which has now set off additional tremors in the area.

Scott Howard, a geologist with SCDNR explains how the first earthquake changed the dynamic.

"When the first earthquake happened, what it may have done is re-adjusted the system and may have caused more fracture prosody and permeability, greater permeability as a result of that and each earthquake is changing that system, so how do you correlate that? Well, it isn't a one-on-one thing, so it isn't like the water levels in the river change and that causes an earthquake, it's just that the proximity of the water may be a way of getting water into the fracture system," Howard said.

"Well, I go back to the point ... if you look at the history of earthquakes in the southeast, you look at where they occur ... 90% of them are occurring in stream valleys, and they are occurring where there's water," Howard said.

Elgin resident William Pate has felt at least three of the tremors and says he's glad some research is being done. "I'm glad someone's looking into, we've all been freaked out about it around here."

Howard said all in all, the report was to help get information out to the public.

"We wanted to get out some good geological information about where the geological community stood on these earthquakes."

As for those in Kershaw County, the Town of Elgin plans to host a Virtual Earthquake Town Hall on Wednesday, June 27th.

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in South Carolina. Here's what you need to know.

COVID-19 cases are surging in South Carolina as a highly infectious new variant, BA.5, tightens its grip on communities statewide.Cases spiked by over 15% between June and July and continue to rise: the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) recorded 13,772 new cases between July 9 and July 16, a 4% increase compared to the week before. Pickens, Dorchester, Newberry, Kershaw and Greenville are the counties reporting the highest case rates.We asked DHEC about this trend, how South Carolinians can st...

COVID-19 cases are surging in South Carolina as a highly infectious new variant, BA.5, tightens its grip on communities statewide.

Cases spiked by over 15% between June and July and continue to rise: the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) recorded 13,772 new cases between July 9 and July 16, a 4% increase compared to the week before. Pickens, Dorchester, Newberry, Kershaw and Greenville are the counties reporting the highest case rates.

We asked DHEC about this trend, how South Carolinians can stay up-to-date on the status of the pandemic and what steps we can take to avoid getting sick.

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How often does DHEC update its COVID-19 dashboard?

Since March 2022, DHEC has been updating its COVID-19 dashboard on a weekly basis. Check for new data every Tuesday, when the dashboard is refreshed with numbers from Sunday through Saturday of the previous week.

Should we expect more frequent updates, given the rise in cases?

DHEC does not plan on increasing the frequency of its reporting.

“A few additional days’ worth of data doesn’t change the public health actions residents should be taking: wearing masks in accordance with the CDC's COVID-19 Community Levels map, getting fully vaccinated and boostered as recommended, and staying home when sick,” said a spokesperson for the department.

How is DHEC collecting information on cases? What about testing at home?

Because the increased availability of nonreportable at-home COVID-19 tests has made data on the total number of cases less reliable, DHEC focuses its data collection efforts on severe cases that result in hospitalizations and deaths.

“These numbers provide a more accurate depiction of how COVID-19 is impacting communities,” said a department spokesperson.

Will South Carolina open more testing sites?

No. Since April 2022, DHEC has operated PCR testing sites only in counties where it is the sole provider of those tests. However, there are numerous testing sites available statewide.

What is the most accurate, up-to-date picture of COVID-19 data for South Carolina?

As cases rise nationwide, DHEC’s weekly updates to its COVID-19 dashboard provide the most up-to-date look at the pandemic in South Carolina.

What can I do to avoid getting sick?

“If South Carolinians and the rest of the nation monitor COVID community levels and when indicated limit their exposure to people outside of their homes and normal circles, mask up when recommended, and stay up to date on their vaccination and boosters, that will go a long way in preventing COVID-19 spread,” said a DHEC spokesperson. “But if we see vacationing and public gatherings without masking as community levels increase, and less preventative measures are being taken, we can expect cases to continue to increase.”

DHEC: New COVID-19 vaccine should be available in SC soon

Novavax was approved by the CDC for use against COVID-19 in persons 18 years and olderCOLUMBIA, S.C. — Following yesterday's announcement by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that it has approved a fourth vaccine for use against COVID-19, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) said it should have doses of the new Novavax vacci...

Novavax was approved by the CDC for use against COVID-19 in persons 18 years and older

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Following yesterday's announcement by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that it has approved a fourth vaccine for use against COVID-19, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) said it should have doses of the new Novavax vaccine available for those who want it as early as the week of July 25.

The approval of Novavax will offer those who have been hesitant about getting vaccinated a new alternative. Novavax differs from previous vaccines in that it uses a traditional virus-blocking technology -- one already widely used in vaccines used to prevent conditions such as shingles, the human papillomavirus and others -- rather than genetic coding used by Pfizer and Moderna, or the manipulated cold virus used by Johnson & Johnson.

Like Pfizer and Moderna, Novavax is a two-dose vaccine. While it has been approved for those 18 and older, studies are underway to determine its usefulness in adolescents as well.

Studies done in the US, Mexico and Britain have shown two doses of Novavax are 90% effective preventing symptomatic COVID-19.

The first doses of Novavax could begin arriving in South Carolina as early as next week, said Louis Eubank, DHEC’s COVID-19 director.

The latest COVID-19 numbers in South Carolina, as of July 16, show that the number of COVID-19 cases are slowly rising with 13,772 cases reported (an increase of 3.9% from the week before), and 477 hospitalizations (an increase of 13.8%)

In the weekly COVID-19 county check that looks at data in individual counties throughout South Carolina and rates community levels as high, medium, or low, Richland, Lexington, Fairfield, Newberry, Sumter counties are designated as having a high community level. At this level, you should be wearing a face mask while indoors in public and get tested if you have symptoms of COVID-19.

Kershaw and Orangeburg counties' community level is medium. If you are at high risk for severe illness, talk to your healthcare provider about the need to wear a mask and take other precautions.

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