loading
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Kershaw, SC

Let's Talk!

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Kershaw:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Kershaw, SC

Two ‘A’ grades on safety for Midlands hospitals, but another is lowest rated in SC

Two Midlands hospitals received the highest mark possible in the safety grades released by a medical watchdog group Wednesday. But a large number of area hospitals saw their drop since the last scores were released in the spring.Lexington Medical Center was given an A grade, and is ranked among the ...

Two Midlands hospitals received the highest mark possible in the safety grades released by a medical watchdog group Wednesday. But a large number of area hospitals saw their drop since the last scores were released in the spring.

Lexington Medical Center was given an A grade, and is ranked among the safest hospitals in South Carolina, according to the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade.

The A was an improvement for Lexington Medical Center in the report from the Leapfrog Group, which issues biannual safety rankings. Lexington previously received a B in the spring grades, as well as the same score in the 2021 fall and spring ratings.

Since 2012, the Leapfrog Group has published Hospital Safety Scores twice a year — once in the spring and once during the fall — to create transparency in the U.S. health system. The rating is focused on “errors, accidents, injuries and infections.”

Based on this criteria, other Columbia-Lexington-area hospitals received four Bs and one C for the fall. Those include:

? Prisma Health Baptist Parkridge saw its grade drop one letter from A in the spring ranking to B, marking the first time since the 2019 grades the hospital wasn’t given an A

? Prisma Health Baptist saw its grade drop one letter from A in the spring ranking to B

? MUHA Columbia Medical Center Downtown, formerly Providence Health, saw its grade rise one letter from C in the spring ranking to B

? MUSC Health Columbia Medical Center Northeast, formerly Providence Health Northeast, saw its grade rise one letter from C in the spring ranking to B

One other hospital in the Midlands received an A, while one that had an D in the spring remains the lowest rated hospital in South Carolina in the current ranking.

? McCleod Health Clarendon in Manning repeated its score from the spring ranking of A, a grade it has received since 2020

? Prisma Health Tuomey saw its grade drop one letter from A in the spring ranking to B

? Newberry County Memorial Hospital saw its grade drop one letter from B in the spring ranking to C

? MUSC Health Kershaw Medical Center saw its grade drop one letter from B in the spring ranking to C

? Regional Medical Center of Orangeburg and Calhoun Counties repeated its score from the spring ranking of D

Overall in South Carolina, of the 51 hospitals that were ranked, 15 received a letter A. That’s a drop from 21 in the spring rankings.

No hospitals in the Palmetto State received an F in the fall grades. The D given to the Regional Medical Center of Orangeburg and Calhoun Counties was the lowest mark dispensed, and it was the only hospital scored that low.

Nationally, South Carolina ranked 21st among all states, with more than 29% of its hospitals scoring an A rating. That was a significant decrease from the spring (41%), when the Palmetto State was ranked 13th in the nation.

New Hampshire (53.8%) saw a meteoric rise to become the top-rated state in the U.S. after placing in the middle of the pack at 25th in the spring grades. There was a three-way tie for lowest grade among North Dakota, Vermont, and Washington, D.C., as none had a hospital with an A grade.

“Upwards of 250,000 people die every year from preventable errors in hospitals,” the Leapfrog Group said. “It’s up to everyone to make sure that patient safety is the number one priority at every hospital across the United States.”

Leapfrog graded about 3,000 hospitals nationwide this fall, and 30% earned an A, 28% earned a B, 36% a C, 6% a D and 1% scored an F, according to its website.

The grades are based on safety data and rate how hospitals have “checks in place to prevent mistakes, and ensure strong lines of communication between hospital staff, patients, and families,” according to Leapfrog, which estimated about 160,000 people die every year from hospital errors, injuries, accidents, and infections.

This marks the 10th anniversary of the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade.

“Never in history have we seen across-the-board improvement in patient safety until this last decade, coinciding with the history of the Hospital Safety Grade,” Leapfrog Group President and CEO Leah Binder said in a news release. “We salute hospitals for this milestone and encourage them to accelerate their hard work saving patient lives. For a long time, the health care community tried to improve safety, but progress stalled. The big difference over this decade is that for the first time, we publicly reported each hospital’s record on patient safety, and that galvanized the kind of change we all hoped for. It’s not enough change, but we are on the right track.”

Leapfrog said measures that have shown significant improvement over the past decade include two “never events,” incidents of falls and trauma and incidents of objects unintentionally left in a body after surgery, both which decreased by around 25%. There was also encouraging pre-pandemic progress on healthcare-associated infections for MRSA, CLABSI, and C.Diff.

These improvements saved an estimated 16,000 lives, according to Leapfrog.

Despite the improvements, Leapfrog said more than 1,000 people will die today because of a preventable hospital error, and every year 1-of-25 patients will develop a preventable infection while in the hospital.

“Leapfrog advises the public never to reject emergency treatment based on a safety score, but to consult with a doctor about the best hospital for planned, elective procedures,” the News & Observer of Raleigh previously reported.

But Leapfrog’s study shows that patients at ‘D’ and ‘F’ hospitals face a greater risk of dying than those at hospitals graded A.

The Leapfrog safety grade is divided into two domains: Process/Structural Measures and Outcome Measures.

The Process Measures include:

? Computerized Physician Order Entry

? Bar Code Medication Administration

? ICU Physician Staffing

? Leadership Structures and Systems

? Culture Measurement, Feedback & Intervention

? Nursing Workforce

? Hand Hygiene

? Nurse Communication

? Doctor Communication

? Staff Responsiveness

? Communication about Medicines

? Discharge Information

? Foreign Object Retained

? Air Embolism

? Falls and Trauma

? CLABSI

? SSI: Colon

? C. Diff.

? Pressure Ulcer Rate

? Death Rate among Surgical Inpatients with Serious Treatable Conditions

? Iatrogenic Pneumothorax Rate

? Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate

? Perioperative PE/DVT Rate

? Postoperative Wound Dehiscence Rate

? Unrecognized Abdominopelvic Accidental Puncture/Laceration Rate

SOURCE: Leapfrog Medical Group

A library on wheels for Kershaw's 'book deserts'

The Kershaw County Library has kicked off it's Bookmobile summer session for kids, teens and adults.They are doing that by using their library on wheels, bookmobile, to help get books to those in apartments & communities, churches, and parks for areas they call "Book Deserts".Amy Schofield, from Kershaw County Library, says the book desert is, "where there are a scarcity of print materials of books, of course being librarians, we are behind reading, having books available in these places in these book deserts...

The Kershaw County Library has kicked off it's Bookmobile summer session for kids, teens and adults.

They are doing that by using their library on wheels, bookmobile, to help get books to those in apartments & communities, churches, and parks for areas they call "Book Deserts".

Amy Schofield, from Kershaw County Library, says the book desert is, "where there are a scarcity of print materials of books, of course being librarians, we are behind reading, having books available in these places in these book deserts is extremely important."

Schofield says the bookmobile focuses on students.

"We're trying to get books into the hands of children who might not have books at home, " she says and adds that the books are not just for children and teens but also for adults.

The bookmobile tags along with Food For The Soul and United Way of Kershaw County which has helped them identify where the book deserts are.

"Going to a library creates an extra step an extra barrier, you have to have transportation, then also they don't have to worry about bringing them back, they are theirs too keep, there's no fines, there's no replacement fee's, so we're trying to make it as barrier-free as possible," said Schofield.

328 Ballfield Dr. (Camden) Third Fridays at 2 PM June 17, July 15, August 19

186 Roy Truesdell Rd. (Lugoff) First Fridays at 3 PM June 3, July 1, August 5

841 Frenwood Ln. (Lugoff) Second Wednesdays at 2 PM June 8, July 13, August 10

971 Wateree Blvd. (Camden) Third Fridays at 3 PM June 17, July 15, August 19

7 Sherwood Ct. (Lugoff) Second Wednesdays at 3 PM June 8, July 13, August 10

65 Payne Pond Rd. (Westville) 12 PM on dates below Tuesday, August 16

6390 Lockhart Rd. (Kershaw) 1 PM** on dates below Wednesday, July 20

905 Longtown Rd. (Lugoff) 2 PM on dates below Monday, June 20

1633 Perkins Rd. (Cassatt) 2 PM on dates below Friday, August 12

2920 Timrod Rd. (Bethune) 12 PM on dates below Thursday, July 20

3238 John G. Richards Rd. (Liberty Hill) 1 PM on dates below Wednesday, June 15

1615 Campbell St. (Camden) Fourth Wednesdays at 11:30 AM June 22, July 27, August 24

192 Stower St. (Camden) Second Fridays at 11:30 AM June 10, July 8, August 12

3 Competition Dr. (Camden) Third Mondays at 11:30 AM June 20, July 18, August 15.

Small town SC store sells pair of six-digit winning lottery tickets for same drawing

The next time there’s a big lottery drawing, players might be lining up at the Wildwood Market to buy their tickets.The convenience store in Lugoff has proven itself to be lucky, selling two six-figure winning games last week...

The next time there’s a big lottery drawing, players might be lining up at the Wildwood Market to buy their tickets.

The convenience store in Lugoff has proven itself to be lucky, selling two six-figure winning games last week, the South Carolina Education Lottery said in a news release.

Thursday’s Palmetto Cash 5 drawing produced a pair of $200,000 winners that were sold at the Kershaw County store, according to the release.

The winning numbers were 2, 11, 15, 16, 26, and Power-Up: 2. They were the only top-prize winning tickets in the game’s past four drawings.

The ticket buyers each bought the Powered-Up option for $1, which doubled the prizes to $200,000, according to the release.

The winners have 180 days to claim their prizes, according to lottery officials.

The winners will be allowed to retain some privacy, as South Carolina is one of eight states — along with Delaware, Kansas, Georgia, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio and Texas — that allow lottery winners to remain anonymous.

The odds of winning $200,000 playing Palmetto Cash 5 are 878,399-to-1, according to the release.

Information about the likelihood of the same store selling two winning tickets in the same drawing was not available, but the odds of lightning striking twice in the same spot are 1-in-9 million.

“Sign the back of your ticket and put it in a safe location until you’re ready to come forward to claim the prize,” lottery officials said.

Wildwood Market will receive two commissions of $2,000 for selling the winning tickets when they are turned into lottery officials.

In addition to the six-figure jackpot, lottery officials said more than 5,600 ticket holders also won prizes following Thursday’s Palmetto Cash 5 drawing.

For complete information on claiming prizes, go to sceducationlottery.com.

Doe! Lost deer slips and slides after running inside South Carolina restaurant

KERSHAW, S.C. — Workers at a South Carolina restaurant were startled when a deer ran inside the building on Monday. They were even more surprised when the frightened animal lost its footing on the hardwood floor and scrambled to regain its balance.The 521 Filling Station in Kershaw, which bills itself as the “home of the 16-ounce ribeye,” had a rare encounter with the deer on Monday, ...

KERSHAW, S.C. — Workers at a South Carolina restaurant were startled when a deer ran inside the building on Monday. They were even more surprised when the frightened animal lost its footing on the hardwood floor and scrambled to regain its balance.

The 521 Filling Station in Kershaw, which bills itself as the “home of the 16-ounce ribeye,” had a rare encounter with the deer on Monday, The State newspaper of Columbia reported.

Surveillance video recorded on Monday showed a small deer running inside the restaurant’s dining area, which was mostly empty except for servers and other staff members. The deer knocked over a chair and desperately looked for a way to return outside, according to the newspaper.

“The deer ran across Highway 521 straight through our front door, shattering it,” co-owner Kevin Sims wrote in a Wednesday message to The State. “He then went inside and ran around frantically.”

The video shows the distressed deer falling over several times as it was unable to get a secure grip on the restaurant’s floors, WCIV-TV reported.

Sims said Beth Truesdale, a server, and Maxine Dease, a cook, were assisted by another customer as they were able to wrangle the deer outside and release the animal, according to The State.

Well done.

Sims said the deer only caused minimal damage during its scramble inside the restaurant.

“Luckily, only the front door was damaged,” Sims wrote in his message to the newspaper.

The deer was not injured, and neither were restaurant staffers or customers, WCIV reported.

Latest headlines:

ELGIN EARTHQUAKES: Experts share tips and answer questions from concerned Kershaw County citizens

KERSHAW COUNTY, SC (WOLO) — Earthquakes have been a common occurrence in the Palmetto State this year.Concerned residents in Kershaw County asked experts questions at a town hall meeting about the recent swarm of earthquakes.“There are earthquakes occurring all over South Carolina,” said state geologist Scott Howard. “There just happens to be the little swarm right now in Elgin.”Howard says there have been 64 recorded earthquakes in the state since December 27th of last year.DHEC has ...

KERSHAW COUNTY, SC (WOLO) — Earthquakes have been a common occurrence in the Palmetto State this year.

Concerned residents in Kershaw County asked experts questions at a town hall meeting about the recent swarm of earthquakes.

“There are earthquakes occurring all over South Carolina,” said state geologist Scott Howard. “There just happens to be the little swarm right now in Elgin.”

Howard says there have been 64 recorded earthquakes in the state since December 27th of last year.

DHEC has already said that mining is not causing the Elgin earthquakes, so what is causing them?

Howard says it deals more with the area’s geology.

“There does seem to be a large structure and associated faults that is probably the smoking gun in this case,” the geologist said.

Five of the earthquakes have been over a magnitude of 3, with the strongest being 3.6.

“When you start getting to a magnitude of 2.5 to 5.4, they are felt. They could cause minor damage,” said Leland Colvin, SC DOT deputy secretary of engineering. “You see half a million of those worldwide from a frequency standpoint.”

Significant damage to buildings is not typically seen unless there’s an earthquake of a 5.5 magnitude of higher. According to geologists, there have not been any this strong in the state in the past 100 years.

However, there are ways you can prepare for an earthquake no matter how strong.

“First, conduct a home hazard hunt. Look for any ways to secure your furniture and belongings to make sure they are protected,” said Kim Stenson, director of the South Carolina Emergency Management Division. “Second, check your insurance policies. Most insurance policies do not cover that, unless you have separate earthquake damage insurance. The South Carolina Department of Insurance has a dedicated website to guide you through any questions you might have. Your insurance agent is also a good source of information there.”

He says its also a good idea to have an emergency kit of supplies in the event of a large earthquake. Once you feel the ground shaking, there are things you can do to protect yourself.

“Drop to the ground. Cover your whole body with a sturdy piece of furniture like a table or a desk,” said Stenson. “Make sure your head and neck are protected. Hold on until the ground starts shaking.”

When will the next earthquake be? Howard says that is not a question scientists are able to answer.

“Predicting an earthquake is not quite feasible yet, if ever,” Howard said.

The largest earthquake in South Carolina’s history occurred in 1886 in Charleston. The 7.3 magnitude earthquake destroyed many buildings and resulted in the deaths of at least 60 people.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.