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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Ladson, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Ladson:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Ladson, SC

Lowcountry Veterans reflect on meaning of Independence Day

LADSON, S.C. (WCBD) – Lowcountry veterans are reflecting on the meaning of Independence Day as celebrations occur across the country.Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #3433 in Ladson celebrated Independence Day with a family-friendly event including games, and food, complete with a fireworks show.News 2 stopped by the event to find out what Independence Day means to the men and women who served.Many of the veterans at Post 3433 served for decades. They dedicated part of their lives to protecting Americans and preservin...

LADSON, S.C. (WCBD) – Lowcountry veterans are reflecting on the meaning of Independence Day as celebrations occur across the country.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #3433 in Ladson celebrated Independence Day with a family-friendly event including games, and food, complete with a fireworks show.

News 2 stopped by the event to find out what Independence Day means to the men and women who served.

Many of the veterans at Post 3433 served for decades. They dedicated part of their lives to protecting Americans and preserving freedom. Some say celebrating Independence Day makes their years of service worth it.

“What is most important remember is we wouldn’t have a country, we wouldn’t have a Fourth of July if it weren’t for veterans,” said Rudy Sookbirsingh, a U.S. Army veteran.

Monday’s event highlights the importance of veterans having access to a VFW post.

“That’s what we’re here for. To be with our friends. Because we’re all friends,” said Curtis Peterson, a 20-year Air Force veteran, and the current VFW District Commander.

For some veterans, the VFW is their only source of social interaction and friendship so they spend their afternoons with their comrades swapping stories.

“We provide support and care for those veterans so it’s very rewarding,” said Ted Tufts, a 22-year Air Force veteran.

While sharing stories and good times during Monday’s event, veterans reflected on what Independence Day means to them.

“Independence day means the freedom to do what we want in this country,” said Peterson. “Speak, hold rallies, talk to each other, love each other. Cause I’ve been to other countries and there’s no freedom like we have here. We have the right to speak up and do what we want to do. Travel across the United States from one end to the other and have a good time.”

“This is our freedom. We spent a lot of time fighting and providing support and care for our fellow countrymen all over the world,” said Tufts.

“This is the best country in the world and it wouldn’t be the best country without the sacrifice of some of these people,” said Sookbirsingh.

Beth Tufts, the newly-appointed S.C. President of the VFW Auxiliary says she prefers calling the holiday Independence Day instead of the Fourth of July because of the weight the holiday holds.

“The Fourth of July plays it down. It’s a date. It means a time to go out and have a barbecue. To have hamburgers and hotdogs. That’s the Fourth of July. Independence Day is what it is,” said Tufts.

High school wrestling team’s firework stand broken into

LADSON, S.C. (WCBD) – The firework stand that benefits the Fort Dorchester High School wrestling team was broken into Friday night, but the team says they’re not going to let this setback slow them down.“The lock was on there but,” Fort Dorchester High School head wrestling coach Andrew Young said, “there was like some separation, so I’m like, ‘That’s weird.’ And then when I came around, I kind of got that sick feeling when I got closer. Then, I was like, ‘Uh-oh.’&rdquo...

LADSON, S.C. (WCBD) – The firework stand that benefits the Fort Dorchester High School wrestling team was broken into Friday night, but the team says they’re not going to let this setback slow them down.

“The lock was on there but,” Fort Dorchester High School head wrestling coach Andrew Young said, “there was like some separation, so I’m like, ‘That’s weird.’ And then when I came around, I kind of got that sick feeling when I got closer. Then, I was like, ‘Uh-oh.’”

Young arrived at his firework stand Saturday morning and noticed something was off.

“I was like, ‘Well, maybe…’ I didn’t want to jump to conclusions,” Young said. “And then, the closer I got, the more that sick feeling kind of grew and I was like, “Aw man, they got us.’”

Someone broke into the stand Friday night and stole nearly $4,000 worth of fireworks.

“I was definitely angry at first,” team mom Shantal Chrobocinski said. “This is a huge fundraiser that we do for the kids for the wrestling team. It’s just pretty frustrating at the fact that somebody would steal something from the kids.”

Latasha Holloway, whose two sons are on the wrestling team, says they were in disbelief when she told them about the break-in.

“They were like, ‘Mom, you’re not telling the truth. You’re not telling us the truth at all,’” Holloway said. “I said, ‘Yeah, it was.’ I said, ‘We were.’ They were like, ‘Well, how much was it?’ I was like, ‘We’ll discuss that later.’”

The team decided to post about the incident on Facebook. That post has now been shared over 130 times.

“We’ve had people come up and say, ‘Hey, we saw on Facebook and we’d like to support you,’” Chrobocinski said, “which is just amazing. There are still good people in this world, and even though something bad happened to us, our community has come together to really help us.”

Coach Young says it hurts that someone stole potential opportunities from his team, but he calls it a learning experience, and won’t let this keep him, or his team, down.

“We teach them how to function when you’re uncomfortable,” Young said. “And like you said, with adversity and pushing through it, that’s everything we do. We push ourselves each and every day to be better. This is an opportunity, you know, when we get down we don’t sulk in what’s going on, but we try to figure a way over, under or through it.”

The firework stand is located at 3685 Ladson Road, and will be open on July 4th and July 5th.

Lowcountry parents still face battle to find baby formula

LADSON, S.C. (WCSC) - Allison Lotz of Ladson has three children, including a 3-and-a-half-month-old baby boy.Her son needs specialized formula because he has a milk protein intolerance. Over the past month, she said shelves have been bare.“The second I wake up in the morning, I log on to Amazon, Target, and all the local grocery stores and Walmart to check to see if they have anything in stock,” Lotz said. “Then typically I will visit a few stores dur...

LADSON, S.C. (WCSC) - Allison Lotz of Ladson has three children, including a 3-and-a-half-month-old baby boy.

Her son needs specialized formula because he has a milk protein intolerance. Over the past month, she said shelves have been bare.

“The second I wake up in the morning, I log on to Amazon, Target, and all the local grocery stores and Walmart to check to see if they have anything in stock,” Lotz said. “Then typically I will visit a few stores during the day. I have family that lives right here in town and there have been times we have gone to 20 stores in a day.”

The formula shortage began because of a combination of supply chain issues and the closure of an Abbott Nutrition plant.

Lotz said she depends on the community’s help to find the formula in stock. She’s a member of the Facebook group “Formula Finders Charleston, SC,” a group of 1,700 members. Members post when and where they find certain formulas to try to help others who need them.

“I have lost a lot of sleep. I have cried many tears over, you know, what do you do if you can’t find it,” Lotz said. “Like when we get to the point where we are to our last bottle, what do you do?”

But even if she can find two or three bottles on the shelf, it doesn’t give her a break from the search because her son drinks one 32-ounce bottle a day.

“It should never be this hard to feed your baby,” Lotz said. “You don’t have other options. They have to drink formula. So when you can’t find it, what can you do?”
She said bottles are also “astronomically expensive.”

She said sometimes it could cost upwards of $20 a bottle, and sometimes you have to pay steep shipping fees if you’re getting it from far away.

Dr. Sean Loudin, a neonatologist from Roper St. Francis Healthcare, said things soon could get better. He said over the last month, production has increased and we’ve received shipments of formula from European countries.

“I think we are about to see improvement,” Loudin said. “I know they had said at the beginning of July is when we should expect to have the store shelves look close to normal, it won’t be completely pre-pandemic levels, but they should start to have a supply on the shelves.”

For resources, Loudin said parents should first consult their pediatrician.

Parents can also log on to the websites for the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services .

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Groundbreaking Thursday on 'state of the art' mental health facility in Ladson

LADSON, S.C. (WCIV) — Officials with Trident Medical Center are officially breaking ground on a new, standalone behavioral hospital!It will be the first the first freestanding ...

LADSON, S.C. (WCIV) — Officials with Trident Medical Center are officially breaking ground on a new, standalone behavioral hospital!

It will be the first the first freestanding behavioral hospital to open in the Lowcountry in over 30 years.

The nearly 58,790-square-foot facility in Ladson will include a single-story hospital and interior courtyard with space for recreation and therapy. The facility will have “state of the art” inpatient and outpatient services for Lowcountry residents.

The main difference this building will provide in comparison to general hospital care is more of a focus and extended resources for geriatric and adolescent care. The behavioral hospital will continue adult care as well.

The medical director for behavioral health at Trident, Jeffrey Culver, says he starts every day in the emergency room.

Currently, there are only 250 beds for mental health patients in the Lowcountry, and without a dedicated space for them — in most cases — a lot of them must go to the emergency room.

But with the construction of this new facility, Culver hopes it will help provide a safe space for real change and will get more people the help they need.

“I fully expect when this facility opens, that the dialogue both locally and nationally will continue to help chip away at that stigma. I think we're still a long way from where we need to be, where we can talk about mental health and mental illness the same way we talk about things like heart disease and cancer, but we're getting there. And I think being able to open up a brand-new facility and have people see that what we're doing is part of medicine,” Culver said.

ABC News 4's Sean Mahoney spoke with longtime mental health advocate Kelly Troyer, who works with the National Alliance of Mental Illness - Greater Charleston area.

She says the Lowcountry has come a long way in providing mental health services, but that there is still more work to be done and she hopes this will help kickstart that change.

Troyer also says the need for mental health services has drastically increased over the course of the pandemic.

The City of Charleston reported a 78.1 percent increase in the number of suicides from 2020 to 2021.

Troyer also has a personal connection to mental illness, as her son, Alex, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at a young age. She says finding resources in the Lowcountry was nearly impossible in the beginning, as she had to go out of state for care.

However, she says the construction of this new facility is a step in the right direction.

“As far as access to service, no, there's not enough in our state, especially in the rural areas. Then also, even here in the Lowcountry, we have great resources and we have people. But look at the Latino community and the African-American community, there's more [of a ] stigma around mental health conditions, so they don't reach out as much to the access that's here,” Troyer said. “So this groundbreaking of this hospital is very good news for us in our community. And we want to celebrate that.”

The hospital is expected to start out with 60 inpatient beds with the ability to expand and also will provide outpatient resources.

Construction started on the $30.4 million facility started in December, but officials with Trident waited until Thursday to hold the ceremony because of the weather.

Work is expected to wrap up in spring of 2023.

The groundbreaking ceremony and celebration is taking place at 11 a.m., at the construction site, which is about two miles from Trident Medical Center and right off highway 17 in Ladson, at 3445 Ingleside Boulevard.

This SC pup beat all odds for survival. Now he’s in the running for national hero dog award

Fire danced on the shed walls, sheltering Jake, his siblings and his mother. His mother and siblings escaped unharmed, but a piece of the inflamed ceiling fell on the 3-week-old puppy.Seven years later, Jake the pit bull from Ladson, S.C., is one of the semifinalists for the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards out of 400 candidates from across the country.“When we got him out of the shed, he wasn’t breathing, wasn’t moving. I started doing mouth-to-snout until we got our pet oxygen mask,” said William L...

Fire danced on the shed walls, sheltering Jake, his siblings and his mother. His mother and siblings escaped unharmed, but a piece of the inflamed ceiling fell on the 3-week-old puppy.

Seven years later, Jake the pit bull from Ladson, S.C., is one of the semifinalists for the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards out of 400 candidates from across the country.

“When we got him out of the shed, he wasn’t breathing, wasn’t moving. I started doing mouth-to-snout until we got our pet oxygen mask,” said William Lindler, Jake’s handler and one of the firefighters on the scene of that shed fire in 2015.

Jake was rushed to a local emergency vet’s office by a firetruck in Ladson. Jake began breathing on his own on the trip, but burns marred 75% of his tiny body.

His recovery took about three or four months, and on top of that, the young pit bull’s family abandoned him at the veterinarian’s office.

The office manager of the veterinarian clinic told Lindler that the family had been given options to proceed with Jake’s treatment and were left in the waiting room to fill out some forms.

“About five minutes later, they looked into the waiting room and they were gone,” Lindler said. “And they had just left the clipboard blank with the paperwork on it in the chair in the waiting room.”

After finding out what happened, Lindler automatically decided to adopt the puppy.

Jake followed Lindler to the fire station each day and was eventually sworn in as an Honorary Firefighter and the official mascot. The dog usually went with the team for truck rides and visited schools for fire prevention weeks with his dad.

When Jake wasn’t allowed to ride with the team to calls, things got a little messy. The first year Lindler had him, his wife bought Jake a TempurPedic dog bed for the station. Lindler and his team went out on a call and left Jake at the station because Lindler thought it was too late at night to take the dog along.

When Lindler got back, Jake was found standing on top of the kitchen table, staring at the firefighters with stuffing littered around him.

“It looked like it had snowed in the kitchen because he had totally destroyed that bed,” Lindler laughed. “He was accustomed to going with us on the trucks, but it was about 9 o’clock at night so I just decided to leave him at the station. Well, obviously, he did not like that very much.”

Jake was the star of Ladson’s City Hall and the schools during his three years as an ambassador. Although he had been burned badly, he was always happy to promote the positives and help out with demonstrations.

“The (students) absolutely loved him. I guess they thought it was the neatest thing that there was a puppy that wore a firefighter coat just like us and had a little helmet,” Lindler said.

Jake still carries fame today on social media, which led the American Humane Society to reach out to Lindler about entering Jake into the hero dog contest. His Instagram, “jakethefirepibble,” has more than 23,000 followers as of June 7.

“A couple of his canine buddies have competed in it in years past, and I always thought it was cool when they were doing it, but I never thought about, ‘Could I enter Jake? Should I enter Jake?” Lindler said.

Lindler said he hopes Jake’s story has a positive impact on everyone who’s heard it or has met Jake.

“Everyone has some form of scars, but you shouldn’t let those scars define you,” Lindler said. “(Jake’s injuries) do not slow him down one bit.”

Voting is open to choose the seven finalists in the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards and will close July 22 at 3 p.m.

If you’d like to vote for Jake in the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards and see the other nominees, visit www.herodogawards.org.

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