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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Mineral Springs, NC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Mineral Springs:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Mineral Springs, NC

10 Adorable North Carolina Mountain Towns You Should Visit

North Carolina has some beautiful cities and incredible coastal towns, but there is something special about small towns nestled in the mountains. With the Blue Ridge Mountains stretching from Virginia down to Tennessee, and the Smoky Mountains close by, western North Carolina has some of the most scenic mountain vistas across all the states. Large or small, the quaint towns scattered across these mountain ranges ooze charm and serve as the perfect base for hiking and waterfall spotting in North Carolina. HendersonvilleNestle...

North Carolina has some beautiful cities and incredible coastal towns, but there is something special about small towns nestled in the mountains. With the Blue Ridge Mountains stretching from Virginia down to Tennessee, and the Smoky Mountains close by, western North Carolina has some of the most scenic mountain vistas across all the states. Large or small, the quaint towns scattered across these mountain ranges ooze charm and serve as the perfect base for hiking and waterfall spotting in North Carolina.

Hendersonville

Nestled up in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Hendersonville is a lovely small-town alternative to bustling Asheville. The quaint Main Street in the historic downtown boasts an abundance of restaurants, bars, and cozy stores for visitors to explore. Close to downtown is Jumping Off Rock, which offers incredible scenic views over the mountains. Hendersonville is the apple capital of North Carolina and hosts the annual NC Apple Festival. The area is also known for its vineyards, including Burntshirt Vineyards which is one of the state's best wineries, and Saint Paul Mountain Farms which is a working orchard and vineyard offering tastings and live music.

Bryson City

Sitting right on the North Carolina-Tennessee border and known as the gateway to the Smoky Mountains, Bryson City is the perfect place to relax after a day exploring the mountains. Visitors will never feel far from nature as the Tuckasegee River runs right through downtown, and rolling hills surround the town. Close by visitors can get lost on the Road to Nowhere, soak up scenic vistas at Fontana Lake, or go whitewater rafting on the Nantahala River. Bryson City is also known as one of the best Christmas towns in North Carolina, thanks to the town's Polar Express train on the Great Smoky Mountains Railroad.

Boone

Boone is a lively university town close to the beautiful Blue Ridge Parkway, making it the perfect place to stay a night or two when exploring the Blue Ridge Mountains. The restored downtown area has a great selection of dining and shopping options, including an adorable Mast General Store to buy souvenirs and candy. Boone is a popular base to explore the suspension bridge at Grandfather Mountain in the summer, and the Appalachian Ski Resort in the winter, making it a perfect year-round destination!

Brevard

Brevard is the perfect base to explore the mountains or makes a great lunch stop when traveling from Asheville or Hendersonville due to its cornucopia of cafes and restaurants. There are also many cute shops including the famous toy store, O.P. Taylor, and the charming Rocky's Grill and Soda Shop. Brevard is ideally located close to the Pisgah National Forest, where there are 500,000 acres of trails to hike or explore on horseback. Some of North Carolina's most spectacular waterfalls are also in this region, including Looking Glass Falls, Moore Cove Falls, and French Broad Falls.

Banner Elk

Banner Elk is a popular winter destination due to its location close to some of the best ski resorts in North Carolina - Sugar Mountain Ski Resort and Beech Mountain Ski Resort. It is also a perfect base for summer vacations, just 30 minutes away from Linville Falls, and close to the spectacular mile-high swing bridge at Grandfather Mountain. This small town also has an impressive selection of quality restaurants and is the perfect place to enjoy the scenery and indulge in some fine dining.

Highlands

In the far southwest corner of North Carolina, close to the South Carolina border, Highlands is another beautiful town with a tree-lined Main Street filled with quaint stores and charming restaurants. Just 10 minutes from downtown is picturesque Dry Falls where you can walk right behind the water pouring down off an overhanging ledge. For a bit of luxury, stay at the Old Edwards Inn and Spa, a wonderful European-style hotel and spa right in the heart of the Highlands.

Blowing Rock

Blowing Rock is another popular mountain destination, close by to Boone and the Blue Ridge Parkway. Its striking downtown is a picture-perfect image of a mountain town, filled with outdoor cafe patios and big trees lining the main streets. After a relaxing lunch, visitors can walk from downtown to the Glen Burney trail to see both the Glen Burney and the Glen Marie Falls.

Burnsville

Burnsville is a popular place to stay when exploring Mount Mitchell, the tallest mountain east of the Mississippi. Downtown Burnsville has a charming town square with restaurants and cafes that spill out onto the nearby roads. It is known for its eclectic artistic vibe, with lots of colorful street murals, art galleries, and independent shops to explore. The Bare Dark Sky Observatory is also close by, and is recognized by CNN as one of the 23 best places in the world for stargazing.

Hot Springs

Best known for its hot mineral springs, Hot Springs attracts tourists from far and wide to soak in the rejuvenating waters. The Hot Springs Resort and Spa and Broadwing Farms both offer access to the hot spring waters. The famous Appalachian Trail also winds through Hot Springs, making it a wonderful stop for hikers. Popular events in the town include the French Broad River Festival and the Bluff Mountain Music Festival.

Lake Lure

Lake Lure is the perfect combination of mountain town and lake town. Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, visitors can swim or boat on the lake while soaking up the scenic vistas. For more incredible views, close to Lake Lure is Chimney Rock State Park which offers some of the most iconic North Carolina mountain vistas. While the town itself has a good selection of shops and restaurants, the main draw of Lake Lure is the scenery.

Board updated on construction projects; four members sworn in

HAMLET — Matt Bramstedt, project manager for the three future construction projects at Richmond Senior High School and Fairview Heights and Mineral Springs Elementary, updated the Richmond County Board of Education about those projects Thursday afternoon.All of the projects must be completed by September 2024 as they are subject to federal guidelines through the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funds. ESSER funds come from the U.S. Department of Education through the North Carolina Department of Public In...

HAMLET — Matt Bramstedt, project manager for the three future construction projects at Richmond Senior High School and Fairview Heights and Mineral Springs Elementary, updated the Richmond County Board of Education about those projects Thursday afternoon.

All of the projects must be completed by September 2024 as they are subject to federal guidelines through the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funds. ESSER funds come from the U.S. Department of Education through the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI). LS3P is the architectural firm that is completing the work on this project.

Through the funds, RSHS will be receiving an auxiliary gym along with six classrooms. Fairview Heights will be receiving a gym, while Mineral Springs will be obtaining six additional classrooms.

During the update, Bramstedt, the K-12 Sector Leader at LS3P, said they were wrapping up the schematic design phase.

The auxiliary gym at RSHS will be nestled between the existing gym and the CTE building. There will be a new entry and plaza area in addition to the existing courtyard. The gym will be able to hold 400 spectators with bleachers on both sides. The gym could be used for various sports competitions, as well as daily RSHS activities.

In May, Superintendent Dr. Jeff Maples and members of the Superintendent’s 2021-22 Student Advisory Council met to discuss plans and options for the 28,000 square foot auxiliary gym.

“We’ve been fortunate to receive student and teacher feedback about these spaces,” Bramstedt said. “Their comments have been incorporated.”

The gym at Fairview Heights will be a standalone structure with an “efficient layout.” A covered pathway will connect the gym to the southside of the school. Bleachers are not planned for the gym, although they can be added.

At Mineral Springs, the six-class room addition will be along the north side of the school, adjacent to the playground. Construction of the building will not interfere with student’s ability to get to the playground.

“The design of this particular project is to create that continuity in the whole building,” Bramstedt said.

Board member Daryl Mason expressed concerns that the new classrooms at RSHS will have windows that peer into the gym. He said this could be a distraction for students. Bramstedt said that the windows could be removed, or that blinds could be put in place.

“We’re doing great in terms of schedule,” Bramstedt said. “We’re excited to move forward.”

Budget amendment

Finance Office Tina Edmonds said there was a decrease of $201,846 for instructional services, and an increase of $418,165 for system-wide support services, both state funds.

For federal funds, there was a decrease of $309,755 for instructional services, a decrease of $11,035 for system-wide support services, an increase of $131,291 for ancillary services and an increase of $215,297 for fund transfers.

Chairman Wiley Mabe remarked that they’re operating on a continuation budget as the state budget has not yet been approved. He inquired if there was any news on funding for transportation. Edmonds replied none that she was aware of at the time.

“We know how much it cost last year, all of know what diesel has done,” Mabe said following discussion with the athletic director. “That’s a concern all the way around.”

Maples, Watkins to leave positions

Superintendent Maples and Dr. Amber Watkins, Exceptional Children’s Director, will no longer hold their positions effective July 31.

“It has been the highlight of my career in education to serve this district as superintendent, and I have been truly blessed to work with such dedicated teachers, support staff, administrators and board members,” wrote Maples in a June letter. “I am inspired daily as I visit schools and classrooms to witness first hand the outstanding work you do for the children of Richmond County.”

He has worked for 34 years in public education across Lee, Moore and Richmond County. Maples added that he still wants to be involved with the school system following his retirement.

Watkins has worked 17 years in public education as a teacher, coach and administrator, with the past five years of her career in Richmond County.

“It’s been an honor to serve the people of Richmond County,” she said. “I’ve always wanted to be inclusive in disability support.”

Watkins will be spending more time with her children, but added that she will continue to be an advocate and resource for those in the community.

To support the Richmond County Daily Journal, subscribe at https://www.yourdailyjournal.com/subscribe or 910-817-3111.

Reach Matthew Sasser at 910-817-2671 or msasser@yourdailyjournal.com. To suggest a correction, email editor@yourdailyjournal.com or call 910-817-2673.

Fountain of youth: 'Mystical' healing spring from the 1800s still flows through this NC park

This is a modal window.This video is not supported on your platform. If you are using IE 10 or lower please consider using IE 11, Edge, Chrome, or Firefox.Fuquay-Varina, N.C. — Where is the fountain of youth hidden?Tucked away in a small park, an unassuming creek flows beneath an arched bridge. Families picnic nearby. At first glance, you may not realize you're looking at one of North Carolina's 'healing' mineral springs.Ever since the spring was discovered in the 1800s, people have traveled from across the ...

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Fuquay-Varina, N.C. — Where is the fountain of youth hidden?

Tucked away in a small park, an unassuming creek flows beneath an arched bridge. Families picnic nearby. At first glance, you may not realize you're looking at one of North Carolina's 'healing' mineral springs.

Ever since the spring was discovered in the 1800s, people have traveled from across the state just to get a taste of its water. The drawing power of the spring was so strong that an entire town sprung up around it - the town of Fuquay Springs, today known as Fuquay-Varina.

Mineral spring discovered on a family farm

The mineral spring was first discovered in 1858 on the farm of a Revolutionary War veteran named William Fuquay.

Historians still debate who first discovered the mineral spring – whether it was Fuquay's son Stephen or grandson David Crockett. Regardless, the family directed the water into a pool and began drinking from it regularly. They hung a gourd from a nearby tree, according to most accounts, and the community began sipping from it regularly.

Then something strange began to happen: Locals who drank often from the mineral spring began reporting recovering from their ailments.

An exhibit on the Mineral Spring at the Fuquay-Varina Museums shared some of the claims from the era:

"For complaints of the kidneys, liver and stomach, the water has afforded complete relief. Many cases of heart trouble, brought on and accentuated by indigestion, have disappeared entirely."

"More than one person has arrived at the Spring nearly bent double with rheumatism and left after a few weeks perfectly well."

The spring was described as "bubbling up through a bed of solid rock," and when tested, the water was shown to have: Potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, magnesium bicarbonate, magnesium sulphate, calcium bicarbonate, calcium sulphate, calcium silicate, iron and aluminum oxides and silica.

"When you look at the list of minerals, you can see how the spring water may have helped people find relief from some ailments,"says Shirley Simmons, Volunteer Director of Fuquay-Varina Museums.

A healing hotspot: Attraction draws crowds from across NC

As "taking the waters" grew into a popular attraction, especially for those with ailments, the community grew rapidly around it.

"Three major things contributed to the growth of Fuquay-Varina," says Simmons. "The mineral spring, the railroad and tobacco."

Around the same time, as the springs grew in fame, the railroad was built through the town, allowing easy access for visitors from around the state. Meanwhile, hotels and shops popped up around the spring, catering to the growing crowds. Some visitors stayed around for weeks at a time, hoping to heal from constant access to the water.

"There was even a day-trip train from Raleigh," says Simmons. "It was advertised that people in Raleigh could get on board, come to the healing springs for a picnic and a drink, then go back home."

The immense demand for the spring water also lead to popular celebrations on Easter Monday and the Fourth of July. Photos from the early 1900s show crowds gathered in their Sunday finest for a day at the healing mineral springs.

Saving the history of Fuquay-Varina

Even with their importance to the history of the town, the mineral springs were almost completely overgrown and forgotten at one point, according to Simmons.

Fortunately, the spring was sold to the town and restored into a park the public can visit once again.

Simmons has spent decades working to preserve the history of Fuquay-Varina at the museum complex in downtown. The museum has rescued several priceless artifacts and historic buildings -- like an original two-room schoolhouse from the 1800s, which once stood near the spring.

Aside from the schoolhouse, the museum grounds also allow visitors to explore an authentic early 1900s post-office, a century-old tobacco barn, a vintage playhouse for kids and a real train caboose.

Visitors can explore all of these historic places, as well as the mineral spring, on Saturday, May 7, as part of the Heritage Day celebration. All buildings will be open for exploration from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

The Fuquay Mineral Spring Park is open to the public.

Note: WRAL News has not verified the safety of drinking from the spring in modern times. For information on the water safety, contact the Fuquay Mineral Spring Park.

Noise complaints lead to 6-month ban on new event venues, more in Madison County

MARSHALL - After hearing more than 10 residents complain of noise pollution from wedding venues in Marshall and Hot Springs in its last meeting, the Madison County commissioners have put a temporary halt on issuing permits to event venue developers.The moratorium was unanimously approved by the Madison County Board of Commissioners during its June 28 meeting at the Madison County Center - North Carolina Cooperate Ex...

MARSHALL - After hearing more than 10 residents complain of noise pollution from wedding venues in Marshall and Hot Springs in its last meeting, the Madison County commissioners have put a temporary halt on issuing permits to event venue developers.

The moratorium was unanimously approved by the Madison County Board of Commissioners during its June 28 meeting at the Madison County Center - North Carolina Cooperate Extension in Marshall.

The six-month ban will allow the county and the planning board enough time to assess what changes need to be made to the County Land Use Ordinance, according to John Noor, a land use attorney contracted to work with the county.

The moratorium will pause approvals of the following development categories:

According to Noor, the term "assembly halls" constitutes wedding venues.

"Under your (Land Use) Ordinance right now, you have no definition for things like wedding venues. It's not a defined term," Noor said. "What your ordinance requires is essentially that your zoning administrator find the most similar term for something like that, and 'assembly hall' has typically been the term that it goes to."

Establishments and commercial businesses such as doctor's offices and churches are exempt, as the temporary ban will be in place only for the 12 categories listed above.

"These uses, these defined terms, only relate to uses that have typically been associated with large gatherings of groups that might have noise, light or other traffic congestion issues," Noor said. "Other commercial uses that don't have those problems, I didn't include those in this list. This was just what I saw as the broadest use of categories, and you can tailor down from there."

Developers who have already received a special use permit will be exempt from the moratorium.

"If you've got your permits in hand, it's not going to stop you," Noor said.

The ordinance would allow the county to back out of the moratorium inside of the six-month period.

"There's sort of a safety release valve in this to where if there was a project that just became so urgent that it's necessary, it does allow that project to come to you all, to essentially have that carve-out," Noor said.

Commissioner Michael Garrison and Noor emphasized that while some residents may feel six months is too long a ban, it is the minimum time period required to allow the county time to implement changes to the Land Use Ordinance.

"It would be very difficult to develop, publicize, have hearings, and approve any ordinance change in three months," Garrison said. "It's not impossible, but it would be highly improbable and very difficult."

Noor said it would be "very difficult" to implement the ordinance change in three months, and "almost impossible" to do it in under two months.

"The fastest that an amendment to your zoning ordinance can come through, with having to go through your planning board, have a hearing at your planning board, have a hearing before you all - is essentially 60 days. And that's if you knew exactly what you wanted to do today," Noor said. "So, six months is working at a very quick pace. That staff look at the Comprehensive Plan that's adopted, come up with language, shop that through the planning board, bring it back to you all. That's the amount of time that's likely needed. Of course, if they do it quicker, you can remove the moratorium in advance of the six months."

Venue owners' responses

Chris Nelson, one of the owners of Hot Springs event venue Paint Rock Farm, apologized to the venue's neighbors during the public comment portion of the meeting.

"As a venue that has been guilty of excess sound leaving the property, I wanted to officially apologize to my neighbors, who have had to experience some of that excessive sound," he said. "I don't know if there are other neighbors of Paint Rock Farm here. I want to apologize to you also. We do other things besides weddings, but it's been weddings that have been guilty of the excessive sound.

"I believe that you can have a wedding venue in a rural area that has sound that doesn't leave the property. Wedding receptions often have music - DJs and live bands. These bands and the DJs are used to producing a tremendous amount of sound. We were kind of caught off guard by how much sound leaves the property, because it's a big piece of property. But, I think with just getting the volume down - we may have to eliminate DJs because they're even louder than bands - I think that a wedding venue can have music at the reception that doesn't leave the property, and doesn't bother the neighbors. My goal is that Paint Rock can be an example of that - having music that is just at a different level than what some venues do, especially probably in Asheville, where they can have a lot of sound leaving the property. We don't want that. We don't want our neighbors to have to experience that."

Nelson said he felt the moratorium could potentially be useful, so long as the county commission established guidelines.

Ken Kashuba, who owns Hot Springs’ Mountainside Cabins - a small, five-cabin unit - with his wife, Amy, said they are in support of the moratorium.

"We are the neighbors of Paint Rock Farm," Kashuba said. "We think the moratorium is a great idea, so that you all can work on things such as defining certain things, like an assembly hall, or a wedding venue, or a barn even, because they are three drastically different things. But the biggest thing is action. Your actions are going to speak louder than your words. Just like Paint Rock Farm's actions are going to speak louder than their words. You all know where we stand in regard to the noise, and the increased activity, and I thank you all for those of you who are supporting and continuing to drive forward to make this just get into a better situation for all the neighbors of every neighborhood that has to deal with and listen to all these venues."

Amy Kashuba said she and her husband were in favor of the moratorium, as it could potentially bring less headache to event venue neighbors in the future.

"We're definitely for the moratorium even if it's just to help other neighbors of other future venues to not have to go through the same type of things that we are going through, with not having exact guidelines, or difficulties with neighbors getting along," Amy Kashuba said.

In the May meeting, some residents made specific reference of noise pollution at The Ridge, an event venue located off Long Branch Road in Marshall.

In the June 28 meeting, The Ridge owner Marta Bodenhorst's lawyer, Murphy Fletcher, of McGuire, Wood and Bissette, aimed to dispute some of the complaints levied against The Ridge by its neighbors who spoke public comments during the May meeting.

"We do feel like some of the information that's been shared about The Ridge has been inaccurate or incorrect," Fletcher said. "Since its original wedding in 2016, Ms. Bodenhorst has implemented several measures in response to complaints about noise, whether it's building trees as a buffer, or limiting when sound can be played, or how long an event can go.

"Ms. Bodenhorst, like everyone here, has made Madison County her home. She's invested in Madison County through The Ridge and wants to continue to be a good citizen, to be a good member of the community, as well as have The Ridge be an economic success here in the community. Again, we're here to engage. We're here to participate in this process."

Commissioners' views

Garrison said the moratorium would provide the county time to address the county ordinances "insufficiencies of clarity, coverage and concern."

"I think if we do that, it sets a realistic expectation for anyone who seeks to have whatever opportunities on their own property," he said. "It gives them realistic expectations about what we as a community and as a county expect. It also gives them clarity of what the guidelines are going to be in seeking to develop a business opportunity, and it also gives the community opportunity to be a part of that process to help ensure that we have sufficient coverage in our ordinances to help address those areas of concern."

Interim County Manager Norris Gentry said the moratorium will serve as an opportunity.

"We have recognized, and now we need to work together to come up with the best possible answers," Gentry said. "I am fully in support of this community, and all of us working together to find the best alternative."

The moratorium is not meant "to knock anybody's business, or to knock anybody out of business," Bboard Chair Mark Snelson said.

"But for these people that have lived here all their lives, it is their business when they don't have peace and quiet at home," Snelson said.

Tar Heel Treasures: This town has the only natural hot spring in the state

MADISON COUNTY, N.C. — There is only one place in North Carolina where you can experience natural hot springs. It’s in the western part of the state, and the town is called Hot Springs.Hot Springs Resort and Spa offers mineral baths from a natural hot spring across the creekThe resort is one of many over the years. The first hotel and bath house was built in the early 1800sThe resort offers 17 outdoor bath houses with additional baths attached to their lodgingIn the hills of Madison County are the soun...

MADISON COUNTY, N.C. — There is only one place in North Carolina where you can experience natural hot springs. It’s in the western part of the state, and the town is called Hot Springs.

Hot Springs Resort and Spa offers mineral baths from a natural hot spring across the creek

The resort is one of many over the years. The first hotel and bath house was built in the early 1800s

The resort offers 17 outdoor bath houses with additional baths attached to their lodging

In the hills of Madison County are the sounds of bubbling water. It’s the home to Hot Springs Resort and Spa.

Heather Hicks is the manager at the resort. The spot holds a special place in her heart because she grew up in the county, and several generations of her family worked on the grounds.

“I grew up a steward of the water,” Hicks said. “I grew up on the French Broad River, which is a big place for whitewater rafting. So it was a natural progression for me to come here to Hot Springs to continue my stewardship.”

She loves this area because it has a sense of tranquility. There are no sounds of a bustling city but rather birds, water and nature.

“This is a beautiful natural setting,” Hicks said. “There are no chain restaurants and no stop lights. You can get lost in time in this town. It’s one thing I love about it, and our guests love about it.”“This is a beautiful natural setting,” Hicks said. “There are no chain restaurants and no stop lights. You can get lost in time in this town. It’s one thing I love about it, and our guests love about it.”

The resort features 17 outdoor hot tubs and additional lodging that also has attached tubs. The natural hot springs sit across the creek on a private part of the resort. Workers use an underground piping system to bring the water from the hot springs directly into the spa.

“Our spring is an artesian spring, which means they bubble up,” Hicks said. “It comes from about a half-mile underground. The water temperature there is about 110 degrees Fahrenheit. By the time it reaches the tubes, it’s 102 to 103.”

These mineral baths weren’t always located in the same spot. There were several locations since the early 1800s. On the grounds of the resort, visitors can see the ruins of a bathhouse from the 1860s.

“The bathhouse had eight 4-foot-deep, marble-lined tubs and guests came here for a 21-day convalescence program, soaking, healthy food, massage and maybe a golf game or two,” Hicks said.

That bathhouse was the fourth one built. Down the street, at the Hot Springs Welcome Center visitors can learn about the resort’s history. The first hotel was built in 1837.

“The warm springs hotel was an absolutely beautiful property with grand pillars,” Hicks said.

It was designed for exclusive guests and the elite class. It was one of many hotels on the grounds that burned down over the years. The area was also prone to floods and fires.

“I think that Hot Springs are a very special place,” Hicks said. “Mother nature is in charge of this town. The grand affluent hotels that didn’t allow everyone access to the water maybe didn’t go with the flow.”

Hicks says while they do charge guests to use the hot tubs, they tried to make them affordable and available to anyone who wants to soak.

“The water itself is fantastic,” Hicks said. “There is a huge allegiance from everyone who works here to take care of the water in this very special place and to tell the stories of the past. It’s part of our Appalachian heritage.”

Hot Springs Resort and Spa is open seven days a week. Minerals baths range in price starting at $50 for two people. Reservations are required ahead of time.

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