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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Mineral Springs, NC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Mineral Springs:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Mineral Springs, NC

An epic journey: Waukon graduate Owen Frieden logs more than 2,000 miles hiking the Appalachian Trail this past summer

Nearly 2,200 miles from start to finish ... Owen Frieden of Dorchester, a 2021 graduate of Waukon High School, is pictured both above and at right at the beginning and end of his journey this past summer hiking the Appalachian Trail across 13 states in 149 days. Although the Appalachian Trail is designated as beginning at Springer Mountain, GA, Frieden’s nearly 2,200-mile trek began at the Appalachian Trail Approach, where he is pictured above, at Amicalola Falls in Dawsonville, GA, which is one of the access points for Spri...

Nearly 2,200 miles from start to finish ... Owen Frieden of Dorchester, a 2021 graduate of Waukon High School, is pictured both above and at right at the beginning and end of his journey this past summer hiking the Appalachian Trail across 13 states in 149 days. Although the Appalachian Trail is designated as beginning at Springer Mountain, GA, Frieden’s nearly 2,200-mile trek began at the Appalachian Trail Approach, where he is pictured above, at Amicalola Falls in Dawsonville, GA, which is one of the access points for Springer Mountain. Nearly 2,220 miles and half a year later, Frieden reached the Appalachian Trail’s ending destination of Mount Katahdin in Baxter State Park in east-central Maine, where he is pictured below raising his trekking poles in jubilation 149 days later, having completed his journey. Submitted photos.

Looking back at how he spent his summer, Waukon High School graduate Owen Frieden has a lot to reflect upon. He hiked 2,194.3 miles across 13 states in 149 days, all on the Appalachian Trail in the eastern United States. Not only was the long journey the greatest adventure of his life thus far, he says he also made “an unfathomable number of friendships that will last a lifetime.” Frieden shared photos and commentary from much of his epic adventure on his Facebook blog: https://www.facebook.com/WOATH22.

AN IDEA FORMS Frieden, of Dorchester, is a 2021 Waukon High School graduate and the son of Jeremy Frieden and Heather Johnson. This past spring, while working at Toppling Goliath in Decorah, a buddy told him about the Appalachian Trail, which set the wheels in motion for an epic journey. The Appalachian Trail, known informally as the “A.T.”, is a hiking trail in the eastern United States, which extends almost 2,200 miles between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. “In early March, I started thinking about it. I consider myself an outdoors person, but knew I would have to get into shape,” Frieden said. He watched many videos and researched what types of shoes and pack he would need. He went out hiking at least three days a week, in an effort to condition himself for the trip. “My dad was excited, but my mom was super worried. She thought I was going to get mauled by bears,” he said.

A LONG WALK A month or so later, Frieden’s buddy, Tanner Kiel of Waukon, agreed to drive him east, to the start of the trail. He dropped him off April 25. Frieden set out with a pack that turned out to be way too heavy, and a travel plan that he admits might not have been very realistic. “I made a plan, but the mountains in Georgia were bigger than I thought. The hike was definitely harder in the beginning,” he said. At the onset, Frieden said he planned to walk 15 miles a day, six days a week. But nothing really turned out the way he planned it. “The first month I logged 270 miles. The second month I did 900. I just learned you have to go with the wind and listen to your body,” he said.

GREAT COMPANIONS Frieden said he met too many people to count along his journey, and only traveled alone for the very first week of the trip. He met a woman named “Lightfoot,” during his first week, and soon after met up with “Charger,” “Taxi” and “Karma,” who became a type of makeshift family for him during his trek. He explained that everyone has a nickname on the trail, and when asked what his was, he shared how he became “Banana Boat” or “Boat” for short. “I got sunburned in Georgia, so I bought some 100 SPF Banana Boat sunblock. It would not come off my skin, no matter how much I tried. Some of my gear still has it on,” he said. He explained that Taxi had an issue with a previously injured leg. “Taxi followed us in his car and would drive ahead to our daily destination and hike back to meet us,” he said.

CAMARADERIE Frieden said he and his small group traveled well together. They passed countless people, and most of the hikers they encountered were “very awesome and very generous.” “Out of the dozens of people we met, there were only about three I didn’t want to be around,” he said. When asked if anything ever happened to really scare him, he shared an incident which occurred one night in Virginia. “We were in our tents and I heard this awful screaming. A homeless guy had broken into Karma’s tent (Karma is both vision- and hearing-impaired). Eventually the guy’s companion pulled him off and they left. After that, we packed up our stuff and got out of there,” he said. Other surprises along the trail included 17 black bears, one moose, and countless rattlesnakes and porcupines.

THE DAILY FARE Frieden said the average AT hiker burns between 6,000-8,000 calories per day, so it is difficult to typically ingest enough food to keep weight on. Frieden, however, managed to gain three pounds during the trip, while Charger and Lightfoot each lost over 50 lbs. (less than 25 percent of hikers who set out to conquer the trail ever finish the journey, according to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.) How did he do it? By eating junk, he said. “I started out my day eating Pop Tarts and Honey Buns. It was the Breakfast of Champions,” he quipped. For lunch, Frieden would eat some tortillas with tuna or chicken for protein and cook eggs in a skillet or ramen noodles over the flame from a white gas cylinder. He also carried a three-foot Avengers fishing pole he bought at Walmart. “We did a lot of fishing. Maine had some nice trout,” he said. Water was taken from streams or springs they encountered and poured through a “Platypus” water filter into a one-liter bottle.

HARDSHIPS While Frieden enjoyed the time he spent on the AT, he said there were a few times he missed the dryness and comfort of his own bed. In northern Virginia, he battled a bad case of Trench Foot. “The bottom of my foot looked like it had been through a cheese grater,” he said, adding he wrapped his feet in Leukotape, a popular sports tape used by hikers, until it healed. He added,” Me and Charger both got sick once. It could have been one of the natural water sources,” he said. From Virginia to Pennsylvania, the bugs were almost unbearable. In addition, water became scarce as they traveled north, due to a record drought. “The northeast had had its biggest drought in years and there were many empty stream beds. In New York, we found only one water source and there were some long water carries,” he said.

HIKER-FRIENDLY Frieden explained that for all of the hardships, there were many things that made life easier for them. “There are many hiker-friendly towns near the trail,” he said. They hiked through the middle of five towns, and there are a total of 52 towns within one and 20 miles of the trail. “I ended up changing out most of my gear. My pack broke around 150 miles into the trip and I changed it out at about 207 miles in Hot Springs, NC,” he said. “Most towns have outfitters which cater to hikers.”

WHAT HE LEARNED Frieden said he learned a lot during his first hiking journey of such great length, including how to rid his pack of unneeded weight. At the onset of the trip, his pack weighed 25 lbs., or 34 lbs. packed with food. He left home with five books, which just added weight, and he ditched them about 100 miles into the trip. By the end of the journey, he had switched his original pack out for a 12 lb. pack that weighed 18 lbs. loaded. He had been through five pairs of shoes, four trekking poles and two tents.

THE TAKEAWAY When asked what other types of things he learned from the experience, he said, “I definitely learned people skills.” He said the trip reaffirmed his “faith in humanity.” “I learned there are a lot more good people than bad people out there,” he said, adding his traveling companions “will easily be some of my best friends for the rest of my life. They’re very great people.”

WHAT’S NEXT? Frieden said his first adventure in hiking went so well, he has plans to continue his travels. “I definitely want to hike the Pacific Crest Trail (2,653 miles) through California, Oregon and Washington from Mexico to Canada, and the Continental Divide Trail (3,028 miles) from Mexico to Canada… Both before I’m 25,” he said.

Yellowstone's Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel To Remain Closed This Winter

Ongoing repairs to the wastewater treatment system that serves the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel in Yellowstone National Park will require that the hotel stay closed to overnight guests this winter, though some visitor services will be available.The system was severely damaged in June when historic flood waters roared through the northern portion of the park. Currently, a new wastewater treatment system is being built to serve the Mammoth area, however, the temporary sy...

Ongoing repairs to the wastewater treatment system that serves the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel in Yellowstone National Park will require that the hotel stay closed to overnight guests this winter, though some visitor services will be available.

The system was severely damaged in June when historic flood waters roared through the northern portion of the park. Currently, a new wastewater treatment system is being built to serve the Mammoth area, however, the temporary system is not ready to support hotel operations this winter, a park release said Wednesday.

The hotel closed immediately after the historic flood because of damage to the area’s wastewater system. While there will be no overnight lodgings available this winter at the hotel, its gift shop, coffee and beverage service, lobby and ski shop will be open. Regularly scheduled tours and snowcoach service between Mammoth Hot Springs, Old Faithful and other iconic locations will be available.

In June, unprecedented rainfall caused severe damage to the North Entrance Road between Mammoth Hot Springs and the park’s North Entrance in Gardiner, Montana. In addition, a sewer line adjacent to the road that carried wastewater from Mammoth Hot Springs to a sewage treatment plant in Gardiner was ruptured. Staff quickly rerouted the wastewater into percolator ponds used between the 1930s and 1960s, allowing for summer day-use visitors and residents to stay in the area.

Currently, park officials anticipate a reopening of the hotel in the spring. The hotel concessioner is in the process of notifying guests with reservations about the situation.

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Hot Springs Is The Best Small Town In North Carolina For A Weekend Escape

From far-flung villages in the Outer Banks to tight-knit communities in Appalachia, North Carolina is brimming with small towns worthy of a visit. In fact, you could easily devote an entire lifetime to uncovering all these gems offered in the way of delicious food, traditions, and history. Yet, there’s one tucked away in the Appalachian Mountains, just a stone’s throw away from the Tennessee border, with all of the qualities that make ...

From far-flung villages in the Outer Banks to tight-knit communities in Appalachia, North Carolina is brimming with small towns worthy of a visit. In fact, you could easily devote an entire lifetime to uncovering all these gems offered in the way of delicious food, traditions, and history. Yet, there’s one tucked away in the Appalachian Mountains, just a stone’s throw away from the Tennessee border, with all of the qualities that make small towns in North Carolina so lovable.

Not only is Hot Springs visually stunning — the river and mountain views are abundant — but it’s also filled with fascinating attractions, including the geothermal waters for which the town is named. Whether you’re soaking in a mineral tub overlooking the French Broad River or walking the famous Appalachian Trail which passes through downtown, you’ll feel as though you’ve discovered your home away from home.

From the Hawaiian Island of Oahu to the coast of Massachusetts and everywhere in between, come along with OnlyInYourState as we introduce you to the best Small Town Getaways you can take this year. From nature lovers and foodies to history buffs and shopaholics, there’s something for everyone within these unforgettable, two-day itineraries curated by our local travel experts just for you.

Is Hot Springs worth visiting?

How To Get To Hot Springs

How To Get Around Hot Springs

Best Time To Visit Hot Springs

Where To Stay In Hot Springs

Morning One: Coffee And Hiking

Afternoon One: A Llama Trek, Mineral Soak, And Trailside Dinner

Morning Two: Coffee And Crafts

Afternoon Two: Rafting, Live Music, And Craft Beer

Before Heading Home: Grab A Cinnamon Roll For The Road

So there you have it: an entire weekend itinerary for visiting Hot Springs, North Carolina. We hope you’ve enjoyed this Hot Springs travel guide, complete with a list of Hot Springs attractions and an overview of activities in Hot Springs. From outdoor activities to impressive artwork, fascinating history, and the delightful small-town culture, you’ll find there’s a lot to love about this corner of the Tar Heel State. Do you agree that Hot Springs is one of the best small towns in North Carolina for a weekend trip? Share your thoughts and experiences with us in the comments.

Of course, your adventures don’t have to end here. Check out this waterfall loop in North Carolina that’s just a short drive away!

To discover even more about Hot Springs, North Carolina, in a fun, easily-digestible manner, tune in to OnlyInYourState’s brand new podcast, Not Your Average Bucket List, where we talk all about this charming town. Listen now on Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

Fountain of youth: 'Mystical' healing spring from the 1800s still flows through this NC park

This is a modal window.No compatible source was found for this media.FUQUAY-VARINA, N.C. — Where is the fountain of youth hidden?Tucked away in a small park, an unassuming creek flows beneath an arched bridge. Families picnic nearby. At first glance, you may not realize you're looking at one of North Carolina's 'healing' mineral springs.Ever since the spring was discovered in the 1800s, people have traveled from across the state just to get a taste of its water. The drawing power of the spring was so ...

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FUQUAY-VARINA, N.C. — Where is the fountain of youth hidden?

Tucked away in a small park, an unassuming creek flows beneath an arched bridge. Families picnic nearby. At first glance, you may not realize you're looking at one of North Carolina's 'healing' mineral springs.

Ever since the spring was discovered in the 1800s, people have traveled from across the state just to get a taste of its water. The drawing power of the spring was so strong that an entire town sprung up around it - the town of Fuquay Springs, today known as Fuquay-Varina.

Mineral spring discovered on a family farm

The mineral spring was first discovered in 1858 on the farm of a Revolutionary War veteran named William Fuquay.

Historians still debate who first discovered the mineral spring – whether it was Fuquay's son Stephen or grandson David Crockett. Regardless, the family directed the water into a pool and began drinking from it regularly. They hung a gourd from a nearby tree, according to most accounts, and the community began sipping from it regularly.

Then something strange began to happen: Locals who drank often from the mineral spring began reporting recovering from their ailments.

An exhibit on the Mineral Spring at the Fuquay-Varina Museums shared some of the claims from the era:

"For complaints of the kidneys, liver and stomach, the water has afforded complete relief. Many cases of heart trouble, brought on and accentuated by indigestion, have disappeared entirely."

"More than one person has arrived at the Spring nearly bent double with rheumatism and left after a few weeks perfectly well."

The spring was described as "bubbling up through a bed of solid rock," and when tested, the water was shown to have: Potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, magnesium bicarbonate, magnesium sulphate, calcium bicarbonate, calcium sulphate, calcium silicate, iron and aluminum oxides and silica.

"When you look at the list of minerals, you can see how the spring water may have helped people find relief from some ailments,"says Shirley Simmons, Volunteer Director of Fuquay-Varina Museums.

A healing hotspot: Attraction draws crowds from across NC

As "taking the waters" grew into a popular attraction, especially for those with ailments, the community grew rapidly around it.

"Three major things contributed to the growth of Fuquay-Varina," says Simmons. "The mineral spring, the railroad and tobacco."

Around the same time, as the springs grew in fame, the railroad was built through the town, allowing easy access for visitors from around the state. Meanwhile, hotels and shops popped up around the spring, catering to the growing crowds. Some visitors stayed around for weeks at a time, hoping to heal from constant access to the water.

"There was even a day-trip train from Raleigh," says Simmons. "It was advertised that people in Raleigh could get on board, come to the healing springs for a picnic and a drink, then go back home."

The immense demand for the spring water also lead to popular celebrations on Easter Monday and the Fourth of July. Photos from the early 1900s show crowds gathered in their Sunday finest for a day at the healing mineral springs.

Saving the history of Fuquay-Varina

Even with their importance to the history of the town, the mineral springs were almost completely overgrown and forgotten at one point, according to Simmons.

Fortunately, the spring was sold to the town and restored into a park the public can visit once again.

Simmons has spent decades working to preserve the history of Fuquay-Varina at the museum complex in downtown. The museum has rescued several priceless artifacts and historic buildings -- like an original two-room schoolhouse from the 1800s, which once stood near the spring.

Aside from the schoolhouse, the museum grounds also allow visitors to explore an authentic early 1900s post-office, a century-old tobacco barn, a vintage playhouse for kids and a real train caboose.

Visitors can explore all of these historic places, as well as the mineral spring, on Saturday, May 7, as part of the Heritage Day celebration. All buildings will be open for exploration from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

The Fuquay Mineral Spring Park is open to the public.

Note: WRAL News has not verified the safety of drinking from the spring in modern times. For information on the water safety, contact the Fuquay Mineral Spring Park.

• Credits

Hot Springs recognized as state's 'best small town for a weekend escape'

HOT SPRINGS - For the second time this year, a major national publication has recognized a small mountain town in Madison County.Only In Your State, an online travel publication that launched in 2015, named Hot Springs "the best small town in North Carolina for a weekend escape.""Not only is Hot Springs visually stunning — the river and mountain views are abundant — but it&rs...

HOT SPRINGS - For the second time this year, a major national publication has recognized a small mountain town in Madison County.

Only In Your State, an online travel publication that launched in 2015, named Hot Springs "the best small town in North Carolina for a weekend escape."

"Not only is Hot Springs visually stunning — the river and mountain views are abundant — but it’s also filled with fascinating attractions, including the geothermal waters for which the town is named," the article said. "Whether you’re soaking in a mineral tub overlooking the French Broad River or walking the famous Appalachian Trail which passes through downtown, you’ll feel as though you’ve discovered your home away from home."

The article gives nod to a number of local businesses in the piece, too.

"From opportunities to explore the famous Appalachian Trail to the beautiful banks of the French Broad River, Hot Springs offers an abundance of recreational activities," the author, Beth, said. "Equally impressive are the locally-owned businesses dotting the historic downtown. The combination of all of these things is what makes Hot Springs truly unique."

Big Pillow Brewing, Hot Springs Resort & Spa, Smoky Mountain Diner, Spring Creek Tavern, Artisun Gallery & Cafe, Vaste Riviere Provisions and Hot Springs Rafting Company are all named in the feature piece.

The glowing review marks the second such recognition bestowed on Hot Springs recently, as Travel + Leisure also named Hot Springs one of the "10 best small towns on the East Coast."

Hot Springs Mayor Abby Norton said she was in favor of the Only In Your State article.

"The author captured the essence of Hot Springs when she said it offers 'an endless supply of adventure and charm,'" Norton said. "Hot Springs offers that, and more. Our visitors experience a sense of belonging due to the hospitality of business owners and residents alike. I've always said we live in the best place on earth."

Other county residents were not as supportive of the recognition.

Walnut resident Chris Heaney said she commutes to Hot Springs often and worries that the town's recognition could potentially attract more visitors than the town's infrastructure can handle.

"(There is only) one major road through," Heaney said. "Whenever traffic is rerouted and 25/70 is blocked, it creates unsafe conditions on the few other roads in town. Parking is deficient in both Marshall and Hot Springs because the terrain prohibits many level places. There is only one bridge over the river. There's only one way to get there from any direction across the river. If the town is clogged with drive-through tourists, local folks will have a hard time parking and shopping."

Hot Springs resident Wendy Stancil said she is used to the trend of Hot Springs being recognized and feels the concerns about lack of infrastructure may be overblown.

"This happens every few years — an article comes out or we make a top 10 list and we see a bump in tourism that season, and then things morph back to the steadiness we know," Stancil said. "It’s a fact, in Hot Springs anyway: We don’t have enough parking, and it’s a real conundrum because there really isn’t any additional land downtown available for it. So the town has a maximum amount of 'busy,' regardless of how many articles are written."

Instead, Stancil said she feels the town's biggest issue may be a lack of affordable housing.

"The issue seems to be countrywide, but it is affecting the service industry that serves all the people that flock here because employees don’t have places," Stancil said. "There was a trend for many years that each summer a few more folks would move here, work for the summer and end up becoming residents, myself included. That just doesn’t happen anymore because of the vacation rental market."

To view the article, visit https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/north-carolina/small-town-getaways-hot-springs-nc/.

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