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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Monroe, NC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Monroe:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Monroe, NC

Monroe City Council votes to fire city manager and city attorney

MONROE, N.C. — It was an unexpected shakeup this week as Monroe City Council members voted to oust the city’s manager and attorney, and neither of them say they saw this coming.The now former city attorney and city manager tell Channel 9 they were blindsided by the decision by a divided city council. It’s the latest turmoil at Monroe City Hall, which hasn’t had consistent leadership for the past decade.“This is the most aggressive, audacious, arrogant, unethical motion I have ever been asked to vot...

MONROE, N.C. — It was an unexpected shakeup this week as Monroe City Council members voted to oust the city’s manager and attorney, and neither of them say they saw this coming.

The now former city attorney and city manager tell Channel 9 they were blindsided by the decision by a divided city council. It’s the latest turmoil at Monroe City Hall, which hasn’t had consistent leadership for the past decade.

“This is the most aggressive, audacious, arrogant, unethical motion I have ever been asked to vote on,” said Monroe City Council Member Freddie Gordon.

Gordon, along with Monroe Mayor Marion Holloway, praised the work of former city manager Brian Borne and former city attorney Mujeeb Shah-Khan, saying there was no logical reason for their firings.

But Gordon and Holloway were outnumbered, and the rest of the council members voted to fire Borne and Shah-Khan.

Channel 9′s Genevieve Curtis tried to get more information, but council members Gary Anderson, James Kerr, and Julie Thompson wouldn’t share their reasoning for the shakeup.

Shah-Khan says he’s witnessed council turn over city managers, but now he finds himself on the outs.

“It’s a challenge for the citizens of Monroe who have to ask themselves what their leaders are doing,” he said.

Borne has worked for the city nearly 15 years, and he’s the eighth city manager in that time span.

“It’s not a good track record. Monroe has an excellent, very professional staff, and it’s unfortunate we have to work in this climate, but it is what it is,” Borne told Channel 9.

The move appeared to be a precursor to the city replacing Borne with Mark Watson, the recently fired Union County manager.

Shah-Khan says he made the council aware that Watson is under investigation for malfeasance, but he’s distancing himself from the council.

“I don’t have those legal concerns anymore because as of a few minutes ago, it’s not my problem, that’s an issue the citizens of Monroe need to take a look at,” said Shah-Khan.

Council member Lynn Keziah told Channel 9 that the dismissals on Tuesday came down to a difference in direction and personalities.

“When you hire someone, you hope they’re going to fit, and he didn’t fit,” Keziah said.

That difference in personality and direction is going to end up costing Monroe taxpayers more than half a million dollars. Borne will receive a severance of $270,610 while Shah-Khan will receive $213,399.

Keziah also defended Watson, saying that he was “following what county commissioners told him to do.”

We asked if there were any complaints filed against either employee, and council members told us there were none.

(WATCH: Police drone locates teens accused of throwing rocks off bridge over Monroe Expressway)

Developers hoping to build massive 55+ community in Monroe

The plans for the active living community include 670 homes, a nature preserve, and commercial space near Lake Lee.MONROE, N.C. — A massive new community could be coming to Monroe.The project would offer an active living community for people ages 55 and older on Lake Lee.City leaders are deciding on the project next week, but nearby neighbors want it to be downsized if it's approved. For the latest breaking news, weather a...

The plans for the active living community include 670 homes, a nature preserve, and commercial space near Lake Lee.

MONROE, N.C. — A massive new community could be coming to Monroe.

The project would offer an active living community for people ages 55 and older on Lake Lee.

City leaders are deciding on the project next week, but nearby neighbors want it to be downsized if it's approved.

For the latest breaking news, weather and traffic alerts, download the WCNC Charlotte mobile app and enable push notifications.

Nick Waddell and his family live on almost 50 acres of land on Lake Lee. Their property is directly next to a portion of the proposed site.

"I grew up in a rural area of Charlotte and kind of had this development happening around us and we just decided we wanted to be out of the city and in a quieter place," Waddell told WCNC Charlotte.

Lake Lee is a drinking water source for the city. Waddell worries a large development hoping to move in next door could harm it.

"Wildlife, runoff into drinking water, just wanting to take all of these things into account," Waddell added.

The project is called Eagle's Rest and would consist of 670 homes and commercial space on 340 acres of land on either side of Marion Lee Road. Waddell wants to see the number of homes reduced.

"The vision that the developer has for the property we're really happy with," said Waddell. "Our biggest issue is just the housing density."

The plan conserves 20 acres of woods for the existing Eagle’s Nest near Waddell's house.

The Monroe Planning Board pushed the project forward to the city council in October.

"Monroe's just seen tremendous growth over the last three or four years and this is a project that we've been looking for for a very long time," board member Margaret Desio told WCNC Charlotte.

Desio added that Eagle’s Rest will not impact the community as much as previous proposals for the land that were denied for being too dense.

"Since this is over 55, over 65, it's not going to impact our schools," explained Desio. "And these people don't travel and go to work at eight o'clock in the morning like all the rest of us do."

You can stream WCNC Charlotte on Roku, Amazon Fire TV and Apple TV, just download the free app.

Waddell hopes the builder will work with neighbors to reduce units and preserve more nature. Monroe City Council is set to vote on the project on Nov. 14.

At the time of this story's publication, the developer, the Moser Group, has not responded to WCNC Charlotte's multiple requests for comment.

Massive 55+ community coming to Monroe

MONROE, North Carolina — A massive active adult community is coming to Monroe.Tuesday night, the Monroe City Council approved plans for the 340-acre development off Highway 601, which is getting mixed reviews from the community. Neighbors spoke both for and against the project, which is called"Eagle’s Rest," at...

MONROE, North Carolina — A massive active adult community is coming to Monroe.

Tuesday night, the Monroe City Council approved plans for the 340-acre development off Highway 601, which is getting mixed reviews from the community.

Neighbors spoke both for and against the project, which is called"Eagle’s Rest," at the meeting.

For the latest breaking news, weather and traffic alerts, download the WCNC Charlotte mobile app and enable push notifications.

Some people hoped that city leaders would delay the vote until more research was done on the project. However, the council unanimously approved it.

The land was zoned for low-density housing in a rural area. Now, it is rezoned for 670 homes, amenities like pools and a fitness club, plus commercial space.

"Eagle's Rest at Lake Lee is where active adult living meets exclusive comfort," Tom Crouch with the development team said during his presentation to the city council.

RELATED: Low-income renters feeling priced out amid years-long housing waitlist

The developers of "Eagle's Rest" said the 55-plus community will take advantage of Lake Lee and the surrounding beauty of nature.

"Just over 40% of our site is common open space," Crouch said.

Some neighbors are worried about the high number of homes and possible negative impacts on the lake and animals that currently live in the woods.

"I find it ironic you’re calling it, "Eagle's Rest" when you’re displacing the very inhabitants that live there now," one woman said while speaking in opposition to the development.

You can stream WCNC Charlotte on Roku, Amazon Fire TV and Apple TV, just download the free app.

About 20 acres of woods are preserved in the plan for an existing eagle's nest on the property. Crouch said the nest is currently abandoned.

The developers tell WCNC Charlotte they plan to break ground by spring 2025 at the latest.

Monroe denies rezoning, annexation of housing development

MONROE, N.C. — The Monroe City Council voted, 4-2, Tuesday against the rezoning and annexation of the Wildwood Development.Neighbors against a proposed development took their fight to the city council.They spoke out against the rezoning of more than 100 acres along Weddington Road. Homeowners didn’t want the city council to annex the land and approve a development for more than 200 homes.Previous coverage:If the council gives the Wildwood Project the green light, the view of the woods behind Tam...

MONROE, N.C. — The Monroe City Council voted, 4-2, Tuesday against the rezoning and annexation of the Wildwood Development.

Neighbors against a proposed development took their fight to the city council.

They spoke out against the rezoning of more than 100 acres along Weddington Road. Homeowners didn’t want the city council to annex the land and approve a development for more than 200 homes.

Previous coverage:

If the council gives the Wildwood Project the green light, the view of the woods behind Tammy Millward’s home would be replaced by five houses along her property alone.

“It’s just heartbreaking,” Millward told Channel 9.

RELATED: New development in Monroe sparks concerns about traffic, safety

In September, homeowners told Channel 9 they’d rather see a neighborhood similar to theirs built.

“We aren’t going to stop them, we know that but, there’s no reason why it can’t be a nicer development,” Carol Williams said.

Since then, the developer submitted new plans that lower the number of homes from 260 to 236, but that’s little comfort to Millward.

“It just makes you cry. They want us to think they want to be good neighbors and work with us, but yet from the beginning, they haven’t addressed one of our major concerns,” Millward said.

The concerns include the proposed new road that would connect the entrance to the Willoughby Woods subdivision to other busy streets, bringing more traffic through the neighborhood.

Neighbors that Channel 9 spoke to say they will urge the council to consider current residents.

“Growth in Union County, the infrastructure and the roads, need to be addressed and taken care of before any more homes are even approved,” Millward said.

Channel 9 reached out to the group behind the development but they told us it would be premature to comment.

Wildwood is one of two housing projects being considered by city council.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: New development in Monroe sparks concerns about traffic, safety

Monroe residents take fight against proposed development to city council

Charter Schools Review Board approves application for Union County charter school

Decision overturns State Board of Education rulingOverturning a previous State Board of Education ruling, the new Charter Schools Review Board on Tuesday approved a charter application for American Leadership Academy Monroe (ALA Monroe) in Union County.The 6-1 vote in favor of the application means the K-8 school will move to the ready-to-open phase to prepare for an August 2024 opening. Plans call for ALA-Monroe to open as a K-8 school with 450 students. By Year Four, enrollment is projected to increase to 1,100 students. Sc...

Decision overturns State Board of Education ruling

Overturning a previous State Board of Education ruling, the new Charter Schools Review Board on Tuesday approved a charter application for American Leadership Academy Monroe (ALA Monroe) in Union County.

The 6-1 vote in favor of the application means the K-8 school will move to the ready-to-open phase to prepare for an August 2024 opening. Plans call for ALA-Monroe to open as a K-8 school with 450 students. By Year Four, enrollment is projected to increase to 1,100 students. School officials said there are 1,118 families representing 2,000 potential students on the school’s wait list.

Tuesday was the first chance the new review board has had to overturn a state board decision since new legislation stripped the state board of power to approve charters.

It will get a second chance Wednesday when it reconsiders Heritage Collegiate Leadership Academy’s charter application, which the state board also denied.

The state board twice denied ALA Monroe’s application after the former Charter School Advisory Board (CSAB) recommended approval. The Review Board replaced the CSAB.

In denying ALA Monroe’s application, the state board cited concerns about a potential conflict of interest between ALA Monroe’s board Chairman Mitchell Schwab and his former employer Charter One, which is the education management organization the Board of Directors hired to manage the school. State board members also questioned the academic performance of Charter One managed schools in North Carolina and the management contract between Charter One and the ALA Monroe board.

Schwab, an attorney who works with charter schools, told the review board that there is no conflict of interest. He offered to resign as ALA’s board chairman if the board sees it as a conflict that would prevent it from approving ALA Monroe’s charter.

“I know the term conflict of interest has come up,” Schwab said. “If there is a conflict of interest, I don’t know what it is because I receive no personal financial benefit to this. I am a volunteer on this board.”

As NC Newsline previously reported, the new rules governing charter approvals were established under House Bill 618. The law gives the review board many of the state board’s oversight responsibilities. It has the power to grant, amend, terminate and renew charter applications.

The CSAB had limited powers. It only made recommendations to the state board, and didn’t have the authority to approve, terminate, amend or renew charters. The new law allows charter applicants to request that the Review Board reconsider state board decisions made after July 1, 2022, in cases where they contradicted the advisory panel’s recommendations.

Despite near unanimous review board approval, ALA Monroe leaders did not have an easy go of it on Tuesday. Alex Quigley, a former CSAB chairman who was recently reappointed to the board, peppered Schwab and Charter One officials about the academic performances of five schools Charter One currently manages in North Carolina.

Only one of the five schools met academic growth, which Quigley said is a major concern. He put Charter One officials on notice, warning them that it will be difficult to win his approval for additional schools until existing schools, at a minimum, meet growth targets.

“It’s [meeting growth] highly doable,” Quigley said. “I’m not even talking about exceeding growth, I’m talking about [met] growth. Met is a low bar.”

Quigley was critical of school leaders and Charter One officials after they were unable to immediately explain a $124,000 budget line item.

“I think your budget should be perfect,” Quigley said. “You guys have like five schools, 10,000 kids. You guys are going to be the largest EMO [education management organization] in North Carolina. I’ll be honest, you guys should know the answer to these questions.”

Charter One officials later explained that the line item reflected a 15% management fee that was broken into two parts. One part reflects a 12% or $500,000 management fee the other a 3% fee for financial services — the $124,000.

Charter One is a for-profit charter management firm based in Mesa, Arizona. It’s founder Glenn Way has been heavily scrutinized for his business dealings. The Arizona Republic reported in 2021 that businesses owned or tied to Way made as much a $37 million in no-bid deals by using Way’s company to build charter schools, then leasing or selling the properties to schools he manages.

Schwab said Charter One is held to higher standards and has been “put on the grindstone a lot with most of the boards they come before.”

“Had this school itself not had an EMO contract, would any of these same questions be asked,” Schwab said.

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