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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Mount Pleasant, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Mount Pleasant:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Mt. Pleasant adjusting short-term rental rules, number cap and taxes

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - Mount Pleasant is changing its options and limits on short-term rental regulations. The town first implemented a short-term rental policy in 2020.The planning committee decided rentals should not make up more than 1% of the town’s residential property, and owners would have to apply for a permit and pay a special tax. The 1% calculation allowed 437 rental properties in the town.Planning Director Michele Reed says short-term property ordinances are new to a lot of cities in the past few years....

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - Mount Pleasant is changing its options and limits on short-term rental regulations. The town first implemented a short-term rental policy in 2020.

The planning committee decided rentals should not make up more than 1% of the town’s residential property, and owners would have to apply for a permit and pay a special tax. The 1% calculation allowed 437 rental properties in the town.

Planning Director Michele Reed says short-term property ordinances are new to a lot of cities in the past few years.

“About four years ago, they decided to have staff start kind of conducting some public meetings and start doing some research on what are other municipalities doing and we did we looked at we looked at Folly Beach and Sullivan’s Island, the City of Charleston, and then we looked at municipalities and cities in other states to see how other folks did in other areas of the country,” Reed says.

Now the city is working to refine the ordinance. They will cap applications at 400 short-term rentals and offer two types of applications for owners. Owners who rent out between 24 and 72 nights a year, will pay a $250 application fee and a 4% tax on their property. Owners who rent out more than 72 nights a year will pay a $1,500 application fee and a 6% tax on their property.

“You recognize things as it’s put in place and you begin to administer it. You can’t write the perfect ordinance. So you see where there’s loopholes or you see where there’s problems or the language isn’t crystal clear. And so you see where those changes need to be made. We’ve done that a few times. And now we’re seeing, people do this for different reasons. And have different needs. So maybe we can accommodate that through changing up the program and how we operate it a little bit,” Reed says.

Reed says the application fees basically cover the cost to the planning department to operate the program. When it comes to the rental taxes, between the county and other sources, Mount Pleasant gets about 1% of the money from short-term rentals.

“I think council will recognize that if they didn’t, it could get out of control. And to kind of, not only protect those that want to operate, but also to protect the existing quality of our neighborhoods and the community so that they wouldn’t overtake neighborhoods and things like that,” Reed says.

Reed says all current short-term rental operators will have a chance to reapply before opening the applications to new properties until they hit 400 units.

Kerry Dawson, a Carolina One real estate agent, says she has long and short-term rentals and thinks the city is doing a good job so far.

“That’s how I get my income. I applied for the business license and permit from the get-go. So, I was probably one of the pioneers of that. And it’s been a really simple process,” Dawson says. “It’s been pretty good pretty easy. They’ve kept us informed of any changes. Or anything we need to do as far as taxes that kept it really simple. The little books that they send us each month, and it’s, it’s a good thing, I think.”

One owner, who preferred to remain anonymous, says his rental property is actually a future investment, that he rents to try and offset the cost of owning it.

“Our big desire to purchase this property that we have is not an income generator, but it’s to ensure that my kids are taken care of and have property to live on one day before it’s too expensive to buy,” he says.

He says his property is on the waitlist for the short-term rental, and the cap number could mean he doesn’t get a permit. That would be detrimental to him, as he tries to rent the property to cover the cost of buying and owning it.

“I should have the ability to rent long term and short term and that’s my perspective since I own it. I’m paying probably three times the property taxes on this rental property because it’s a secondary property, and I don’t have the rights to do what I want to,” he says.

The changes are currently in the beginning stages of discussions in the planning committee. The committee will hold a public hearing on the changes at its Aug. 24 meeting at 5 p.m. Reed encourages any owners to come to the meeting or to send their comments through the town website to be a part of the discussion.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Personal finance course to become requirement for SC high school students

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCSC) - To graduate from high school, students probably had to learn the Pythagorean Theorem, memorize the three branches of government and their functions, and read a little Shakespeare.But in the future, South Carolina students will also need to learn skills like managing credit cards and filing taxes to get their diplomas.This upcoming requirement to take a personal finance course comes after a multi-year, bipartisan push at the State House to make sure South Carolina students are financially literate and pre...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCSC) - To graduate from high school, students probably had to learn the Pythagorean Theorem, memorize the three branches of government and their functions, and read a little Shakespeare.

But in the future, South Carolina students will also need to learn skills like managing credit cards and filing taxes to get their diplomas.

This upcoming requirement to take a personal finance course comes after a multi-year, bipartisan push at the State House to make sure South Carolina students are financially literate and prepared for life after high school.

“I think it’s so important to try to teach some of these fundamental skills to these kids as soon as they can so they just get off on the right foot,” Bill Joy said.

Joy teaches a personal finance class at Lucy Beckham High School in Mount Pleasant, where students have to take the course during their sophomore year.

His lessons cover units on budgeting, checking, savings, and more.

“We actually teach kids how to prepare taxes, and actually some of those kids have gone on to prepare taxes for their parents. So these are the type of sort of life skills that I think are really valuable,” Joy said.

Soon, all South Carolina high schoolers will have to learn these skills to graduate.

A law written into the current state budget directs the South Carolina Department of Education to develop the regulations for a required high school course in personal finance by the end of September, to be approved by the State Board of Education.

“We all understand our students need this. They need the foundation and the background knowledge and the schema and the financial literacy, rather than finding it out when it’s too late,” David Mathis, the deputy superintendent for SCDE’s Division of College and Career Readiness, said.

Those regulations include how the half-credit requirement will fit in with the 24 credits needed to graduate and which graduating class will be the first that will have to pass the course to earn their diplomas.

Mathis said they want to be able to offer different options for students to complete this requirement, which could include taking the course virtually, as an elective, or as part of their career and technology education requirement.

The new personal finance requirement will not be in place for the upcoming school year, as Mathis said it could take around a year just to develop the course standards.

“Once that is done, we have to build the coursework around that. We have to secure materials and resources that districts can choose from,” Mathis said.

The Department of Education will also have to work in time for professional development and to train teachers on the new course.

But at least one teacher, Joy, said it is worth it.

“Everybody living in the state, I really think it’s going to better prepare our kids to deal responsibly with money,” Joy said.

Personal finance is a required course to graduate high school in more than a dozen states, including most in the southeast.

Among neighboring states, North Carolina already has a personal finance requirement in place, while Georgia just passed a law this year adding it.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

The 18th annual Sweetgrass Festival in Charleston, SC

Photo by ZACHARY STAINES on UnsplashThe 18th annual Sweetgrass Festival is back tomorrow, July 23. Beginning in 2005, the Mount Pleasant festival has been a celebration of the Gullah Geechee people’s history, culture, and traditions (especially sweetgrass basket arts)....

Photo by ZACHARY STAINES on Unsplash

The 18th annual Sweetgrass Festival is back tomorrow, July 23. Beginning in 2005, the Mount Pleasant festival has been a celebration of the Gullah Geechee people’s history, culture, and traditions (especially sweetgrass basket arts).

Here’s what to expect at this year’s event — be sure to keep an eye on the Facebook page for updates.

About sweetgrass basket weaving

Sweetgrass basket weaving is integral to the culture of Mount Pleasant, which is known as the home of the Original Sweetgrass Basket Makers.

What began as a tool for rice production, the sweetgrass basket has transformed into a decorative art and honors a tradition of artistry dating back to the 1700s. DYK a portion of Highway 17 has been coined the Sweetgrass Basket Makers Highway?

The Sweetgrass Festival provides an opportunity for local artists to showcase + sell their sweetgrass goods.

The details

This year’s festival is on Sat., July 23 and runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Memorial Waterfront Park (99 Harry Hallman Jr. Blvd., Mount Pleasant). Admission to the festival is free.

The stage schedule features performances from local musical group The Plantation Singers and the Wona Womalan West African Drum & Dance Ensemble, plus various programs including demonstrations, discussions, and storytelling held at the Cooper River Room. In short: There’s something for everyone at the event.

Be sure to swing by the Sweetgrass Basket & Craft Show to explore unique, handmade Lowcountry creations including basketry, arts, crafts, and jewelry.

A Taste of Sweetgrass Culture Dinner Experience

Can’t wait for the festival? This evening, celebrate Gullah culture with food and drinks with the African American Settlement Community. In attendance will be guest speaker Reggie Love, personal aide to former President Barack Obama. All-inclusive tickets are $60 each.

Offseason Grind: The Group of Eagles Playing Summer Baseball

YPSILANTI, Mich. (EMUEagles) – The collegiate regular season may be over for the Eastern Michigan University baseball team, but a large portion of the team's roster is staying busy by participating in summer leagues across the country.A total of 12 players are currently playing on 12 different teams across 10 different leagues.In the Great Lakes League, Glenn Miller (Pentwater, Mich.-Pentwater) is...

YPSILANTI, Mich. (EMUEagles) – The collegiate regular season may be over for the Eastern Michigan University baseball team, but a large portion of the team's roster is staying busy by participating in summer leagues across the country.

A total of 12 players are currently playing on 12 different teams across 10 different leagues.

In the Great Lakes League, Glenn Miller (Pentwater, Mich.-Pentwater) is playing for the Royal Oak Leprechauns, Ryan Lux (Shelby Township, Mich.-Stevenson) is playing for the Jet Box Baseball Club while Grant Reising (Canton, Mich.-Divine Child) is hurling for the Lima Locos.

Miller and Lux were both selected as all-stars in the Great Lakes League earlier this summer for their stellar performances.

Further south, Logan Hugo (Essexville, Mich.-Essexville Garber) is playing for the Johnson City Doughboys of the Appalachain League, Jad Oestrike (Tomball, Texas-Tomball Memorial) is competing in the Five Tool Summer Collegiate League for the Texas Freedom, Jarrett Bach (Smithton, Penn.-Yough) is pitching for the Buckeyes in the Mahoning Valley League while fellow hurler Nick Chittum (Grosse Ile, Mich.-Gosse Ile) is playing down in Virginia in the Valley Baseball League for the Waynesboro Generals.

Cory Taylor (Shelbyville, Ind.-Shelbyville) is playing his summer ball for the Alexandria Aces of the Cal Ripken Collegiate Baseball League while Darren Kraft (Mount Pleasant, S.C.-Oceanside Collegiate Academy) is playing in the Ripken Experience MB Summer Collegiate League for the Ocean Forest O's.

Aaron Dolney (Plymouth, Mich.-Detroit Country Day (Nebraska)) is playing his summer ball in the Northwoods League for the Battle Creek Battle Jacks. Finally, Tyler Helgeson (Portage, Mich.-Portage Northern) is hurling for the Bomb Squad of the Grand Park Summer Collegiate League while Zach Gillig (Valley Center, Kan.-Valley Center) is playing for the Newton Rebels in the Sunflower Collegiate League.

The Eagles will link back up in Ypsilanti in the fall semester as the team will begin fall workouts. To stay up to date with all things EMU baseball throughout the offseason, continue to check EMUEagles.com, or follow the team on Twitter, @EMU_Baseball.

Georgia football: Kelton Smith highlights of new Dawgs' 4-star OL commitment

HighlightsShare Videofacebook twitter emaillink<div>http://www.hudl.com/v/2G21Y1</div>CopiedRewind 10 SecondsNext UpLive00:0000:0000:00ChromecastClosed CaptionsShare VideoSettingsFullscreenError loading media:File could not be played 48 Play In his first cycle on board Kirby Smart's staff, assistant Stacy...

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In his first cycle on board Kirby Smart's staff, assistant Stacy Searels is in need of a few talented offensive linemen with size and versatility. He took a big step in that direction on Friday, as Columbus (Ga.) Carver four-star Kelton Smith has committed to Georgia over Texas A&M, Florida State, LSU, and 10 other offers.

Watch his junior highlights above. At 6-foot-5 300 pounds, Smith is the nation's No. 218 overall prospect and No. 10 interior offensive lineman per the industry-generated 247Sports Composite. He's also the No. 20 player in the state of Georgia. On 247Sports, he is the No. 178 overall prospect, No. 8 interior offensive lineman, and No. 14 overall recruit in the state of Georgia. Smith has made several trips to Georgia to date. He was on campus in March to watch the team practice and again in April for G-Day. Smith attended the National Championship celebration in January and was also in town to see Georgia beat UAB last Sept. He took his official visit to Georgia on June 10 and returned to Athens with his teammates and father for the 7-on-7 at Georgia a few days later.

Searels adds Smith to an offensive line class that also includes Fairburn (Ga.) Langston Hughes four-star offensive tackle Bo Hughley, and Colonial Heights (Va.) Life Christian Academy interior offensive lineman Joshua Miller. He is in pursuit of another offensive tackle, with Mount Pleasant (S.C.) Oceanside Collegiate Academy Top 100 prospect Monroe Freeling very high on the board.

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