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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Nexton, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Nexton:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Nexton, SC

Office Vacancy Story Reversed In Some Smaller Southeastern Markets

There’s been no shortage of news over the past 30 months about office vacancies. In large gateway cities, office occupancies fell dramatically during the pandemic as staffs found they could work from home. Moreover, occupancies have remained stubbornly low, as employers and staff faced off over remote work.Though the weeks since Labor Day have seen a number of firms’ employees return to in-office mode, many corporate tenants in the nation’s biggest office markets are downsizing to considerably less space.But l...

There’s been no shortage of news over the past 30 months about office vacancies. In large gateway cities, office occupancies fell dramatically during the pandemic as staffs found they could work from home. Moreover, occupancies have remained stubbornly low, as employers and staff faced off over remote work.

Though the weeks since Labor Day have seen a number of firms’ employees return to in-office mode, many corporate tenants in the nation’s biggest office markets are downsizing to considerably less space.

But let’s pause before assuming the well-reported empty office is the ubiquitous norm. In an assortment of cities in the Southeast U.S., the opposite trend has taken hold. Developers and communities in Alabama and South Carolina, for instance, have noted growing tenant interest in office space, particularly in high-end office buildings.

No vacancies

The Jasper, a luxury 12-story, mixed-use structure in the historic downtown district of Charleston, S.C., features 75,000 square feet of AAA office space, as well as 25,000 square feet of first-floor retail space and 219 luxury multifamily units. All spaces in The Beach Company building, which touts its riverside geography, are currently filled.

The Range, situated within a designated Opportunity Zone in the western end of downtown Huntsville, Ala., not far from acclaimed restaurants, museums and parks, is a commercial office development offering three floors and 49,000 square feet of Class A commercial office space. Walking a fine line between big-city office environments and those with a small-town vibe, The Range offers pedestrian-friendly access to a variety of the Rocket City’s most popular dining, retail and entertainment options. That may be why it recently welcomed two new corporate tenants, Eyecare Partners and Bridgeworth Financial Services.

“People are leaving western and northeastern markets for small and mid-sized Southern cities like Huntsville,” says J.C. Darby, development manager at The Beach Company. “In the past decade Huntsville has become Alabama’s No. 1 city with the addition of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in investment from companies like Mazda, Toyota, The Boeing Company and Remington, all things The Beach Company looks for when scouting development sites.

“The Range is equidistant to the Interstate and all of Huntsville’s economic drivers, including the medical district, Cummings Research Park, NASA’s Space Flight Center and Redstone Arsenal. And we are predicting occupancy growth as a result of this, its walkability and the structure’s distinctive modern design.”

Near job hubs

Meanwhile, demand for office space sparked the development of two new office buildings in Nexton, a master-planned Summerville, S.C. community situated near the region’s top employers, including Volvo and Boeing. One, Atelier Downtown Nexton, offers two-story buildings featuring 2,500 to 18,000-square-foot spaces in a campus like setting where office structures are connected by walking trails.

Developed by Sharbell Development Corp. of New Jersey, the development is the latest within the live-work-play milieu of Downtown Nexton. “The Southeastern U.S. has appealed to Sharbell for years, especially South Carolina, due to its population and job growth, as well as its burgeoning diversity,” says the company’s Thomas Troy.

“Many companies are relocating to the South in search of lower costs and higher quality of life for employees, and our developments reflect that shift.”

Not to be outdone, Workplace at Nexton, a Class A office park within the community, offers 3,000 to 20,000-square-foot spaces, and connectivity to Nexton’s residential side. Residents can walk to Nexton Square’s shopping, hotel and other commercial businesses. Workplace at Nexton’s office spaces had all been claimed before construction was completed, and there’s been no attrition.

“Garden office space with minimal shared common spaces, private entrances and outdoor parks have become the gold standard for commercial leasing in the Charleston, S.C. region,” says Cassie Cataline, Nexton director of marketing.

“Leasing interest for Workplace at Nexton was so great we are developing additional commercial campuses, such as The Hub, to provide office, retail and medical space to address this demand.”

Rotary rails over I-26 expansion roundabouts

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.Wood, a construction service...

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.

During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.

Wood, a construction services project manager for the HDR design firm of North Charleston, led off the PowerPoint overview by describing the multilayered roadwork as a “substantial” and “challenging” project aimed at expanding seven miles of the I-26 from mile marker 187 to mile marker 193. Further, the one-time Naval officer walked the audience through a summary of an interchange construction — in the form of a 192-foot bridge — at Ridgeville Road to promote better traffic flow.

The mere mention of the soon-to-be-built interchange set off a series of questions from multiple club members in attendance, with one Rotarian pointedly asking Wood to list the advantages— if any — of two roundabouts and/or traffic signal/signage alternatives near the Walmart storage facility.

The civil engineer offered that the tight circular roundabout structures serve the purpose of adding a constant flow of traffic that — he estimated — works well with mid-level conditions of highway car travel.

“In other words, this isn’t high volume yet, so it keeps traffic moving under mid-level volumes of traffic,” detailed Wood, who reminded listeners that he is neither the design engineer nor a DOT authority who selected the roundabout method.

A fellow PE in the room questioned the functionality and purpose of roundabouts and the difficulties that they would present to regular drivers in light of the preponderance of large trucks that would traversing the make-shift, circular junction.

Wood explained that the roundabouts would be large enough to handle trucks coming from the Walmart site. He also mentioned how the curving of the circling structures would allow the trucks to navigate the roundabouts, while pointing out that the surrounding concrete would be sturdy enough to withstand the weight of the large vehicles.

Roundabouts are nothing new and have, in fact, been in existence for over 100 years, according to reports. However, their usage hasn’t always garnered public support due to instances where cars entering the traffic circle wind up frequently having the right-of-way over cars that are already in that same circle.

Other traditional cons concerning the viability of roundabouts stem from driver uncertainty about yielding, the overabundance of merge points, driver speed, motorists who try to cut the roundabout and cyclist/pedestrian shoulder lanes that are sometimes deemed as too narrow, potentially endangering those parties.

Wood’s description of the work continued with his narration of project elements regarding the construction of the S-32 Cypress Campground Road Bridge and the new I-26 bridge over Cypress Swamp.

The most formidable challenge of the DOT venture, he observed, is the installation of six box culverts (i.e. structural drainage that spans from one side of the road to the other).

“They’re substantial in size. You’re talking about this one here is a 287-foot, triple-barrel, 10′ x 9′ box culvert across the highway, so I mean, I hope it would be adequate to prevent situations like what you’re talking about,” said Wood in response to a Rotarian’s recollection of the addition of the 1-26 negatively impacting and/or impeding the backflow of area waterways.

“I would think that the new systems would be larger than the existing [ones] to handle these larger rain events. You make me want to check that when I go back, but rarely do you ever go smaller for a box culvert or any drainage component,” replied Wood.

In closing, the presenter maintained that the DOT is doing a fine job of planning ahead in reference to three future bill packages impacting the I-26, U.S. Highway 176 and South Carolina Highway 187.

Other details communicated by Wood pertaining the 1-26 widening and new interchange/bridge construction included a Nov. 30, 2026 contract completion date, as Banks Construction of North Charleston has been hired to handle the labor-and-materials aspect of the project.

“In summary, I’d just like to say that the I-26, mile marker 187 is a major component to the South Carolina transportation planning, which supports the local growth by improving the essential freight corridor essentially out of Charleston with all the port activities and with Walmart, Volvo and other companies moving in,” concluded the married father of three, who has previously managed over $200 million of construction in the Lowcountry.

Berkeley voters pass 2 referendums to fund roads, schools

MONCKS CORNER — Voters approved two separate 1 percent sales taxes to pay for infrastructure and school construction projects in rapidly developing Berkeley County.The infrastructure tax, which will be collected by the county, passed with 74 percent of the vote. The education capital improvements tax, which will be collected by the Berkeley County School District, passed with 71 percent of the vote.The infrastructure tax is a continuation of a seven-year tax voters first approved in 2008 to pay for road improvements throu...

MONCKS CORNER — Voters approved two separate 1 percent sales taxes to pay for infrastructure and school construction projects in rapidly developing Berkeley County.

The infrastructure tax, which will be collected by the county, passed with 74 percent of the vote. The education capital improvements tax, which will be collected by the Berkeley County School District, passed with 71 percent of the vote.

The infrastructure tax is a continuation of a seven-year tax voters first approved in 2008 to pay for road improvements throughout the county. Officials have touted the completion of projects like Phase 1 of the widening on Clements Ferry Road as proof of the tax’s success.

The referendum also asked voters to approve $89 million in obligation bonds to pay for initial projects while the tax is first being collected. It will be repaid with money from the tax. Voters passed it with 71 percent of the vote.

The infrastructure tax will pay for a $74 million second phase of widening Clements Ferry on Daniel Island; two phases, each about $30.4 million, of widening Henry Brown Boulevard in Goose Creek; $58 million worth of widening and intersection improvements along Interstate 26 in the Jedburg area; and a $61 million widening project of U.S. Highway 176 between U.S. 17A and Nexton Parkway.

Ten percent of the money collected from the tax will go to preserve green space throughout the county. It received support from several conservation groups, including the Coastal Conservation League and the Conservation Voters of South Carolina.

“In poll after poll, voters say Berkeley County is growing too fast, leading to record losses of open space and wildlife habitat, polluting our rivers and lakes, and threatening our quality of life,” John Tynan, executive director of CVSC, said in a statement. “With today’s overwhelming YES vote on the transportation and greenspace referendum, Berkeley County voters sent a resounding message that they value their quality of life and the environment.”

The education capital projects is a new seven-year tax that will pay for three new schools, additions to four more and improvements to each of the high schools’ athletic facilities.

“I want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our community for their support and commitment to our students and schools,” said district Superintendent Deon Jackson in a statement Nov. 9. “Our students deserve first class facilities and ample space to learn. With this overwhelming vote in favor of the educational capital improvements referendum, we will get to work planning for and completing the projects as approved.”

The district is growing by as many as 1,000 students a year as more people move into developments like Nexton, Carnes Crossroads and Cane Bay.

District officials have said they will look into other ways to fund the capital projects if the referendum does not pass.

Next community in Nexton to break ground

Contributing WriterThe local master planned community named the best in the nation has begun work on another phase, on the way to 7,500 residences. This new phase of the Nexton community in Summerville and Berkeley County is expected to add apartments for rent, hotel, office space and 150,000 square feet of shopping and dining space when it is completely built out over the next five to seven years.Nexton has sold nearly ...

Contributing Writer

The local master planned community named the best in the nation has begun work on another phase, on the way to 7,500 residences. This new phase of the Nexton community in Summerville and Berkeley County is expected to add apartments for rent, hotel, office space and 150,000 square feet of shopping and dining space when it is completely built out over the next five to seven years.

Nexton has sold nearly 24 acres to Charlotte-based Crosland Southeast, which plans to develop the new One Nexton segment in multiple phases, starting this coming summer. The first phase of One Nexton will include 351 new apartments and 37,500 square feet of retail space anchored by a Publix supermarket.

One Nexton is consistent with the mixed-use development philosophy of the larger Nexton community, which sits between Interstate 26 and U.S. Highway 176 and was named the “Master-Planned Community of the Year” in 2021 by the National Association of Homebuilders.

Nexton sold 456 homes in 2020 and another 576 in 2021 to earn a spot on the RCLCO Real Estate Advisors list of fastest-growing planned communities. More than 1,800 homes currently comprise greater Nexton, including 250 under construction.

Located at the northeast corner of Brighton Park Boulevard and Nexton Parkway, the first phase of One Nexton will break ground in the summer and is expected to be complete in the fall of 2024.

“One Nexton illustrates that Nexton continues to be a national leader in modern community design,” said Brent Gibadlo, vice president and general manager of Nexton. “By fostering thoughtful commercial and residential growth along Charleston’s I-26 growth corridor, we can provide everything our residents want and need while cutting down on commute times and improving quality of life by allowing them to live, work and play and shop all within a short walk or drive from their homes.”

One Nexton will include green space, parks and trails that connect to the rest of Nexton. The master plan for the entire Nexton development calls for 50 miles of walking/biking trails; 2,000 of the total 5,000 acres set aside for woodlands, wetlands and open space; and 400 acres of office, commercial and retail.

One Nexton is the latest phase of the community, built one section at a time over the past decade. Originally developed by WestRock, the real estate company that was formed from lumber giant MeadWestvaco. Today, the development is under development by Brookfield Residential, which acquired the previous developer, Newland, last year.

Nexton’s previous phase to begin development was Midtown, five districts built around a central area of shops, restaurants and a wellness center complete with tennis center, lap pool, yoga studio and more. That followed on the heels last year of Downtown Nexton, 100 acres between Sigma Drive and Brighton Park offering the same amenities and walkability.

Try This: Viva Chicken in Nexton

Tatum here. Did you know there’s a new Viva Chicken location in Nexton? If you love chicken, Peruvian food, or exploring Nexton’s restaurant scene, this spot should be on your radar.Viva Chicken is a Peruvian rotisserie chicken joint whose co-founder is from Peru. The menu includes bowls, salads, sandwiches, and rotisserie chicken or pollo a la brasa.I recently got to check out the new...

Tatum here. Did you know there’s a new Viva Chicken location in Nexton? If you love chicken, Peruvian food, or exploring Nexton’s restaurant scene, this spot should be on your radar.

Viva Chicken is a Peruvian rotisserie chicken joint whose co-founder is from Peru. The menu includes bowls, salads, sandwiches, and rotisserie chicken or pollo a la brasa.

I recently got to check out the new location in Summerville. Keep reading for insider tips (read: what to order) + discover how you can Try This.

What we tried (with pricing):

I tried the quarter chicken with yuca + plantains ($9.55), the maracuya juice ($3.25), and a churro ($3.50). My pollo a la brasa was crisped to perfection + I got the huacatay sauce for a bit of a kick.

When I bit into the yuca (which is like a potato) I thought I’d fried + gone to heaven. Pro tip: Dip the yuca in the huancaina cheese sauce or pair it with maracuya for a sweet and tangy complement.

What not to miss:

If you’re craving pollo, order the quarter, half, or whole chicken with sides like cilantro rice, green beans, and plantains. The chicken is charcoal-fired + marinated in spices.

The eatery has plenty of healthy options like the Andina Power Food or the Inca Wrap. Plus, the menu is 70% vegetarian with the option to add a protein.

Choose from three sauces (all made in-house daily):

And wet your whistle with one of three signature juices:

What we’re still talking about: I learned that Viva Chicken partnered with No Kid Hungry and donates 50 cents for every churro sold. Talk about a win-win.

Also, the outdoor patio was the perfect spot to eat. If it’s a nice day, order on the app ahead of time + enjoy your food in the sunshine. ??

How you can experience this:

There are several ways to get your fix — order through the Viva Chicken App, online, curbside, in-store, or over the phone. Pro tip: Download the app, make an account + start earning VivaPoints. Earn 750 points to reach Aji Status and receive $5 off, 2,000 points to reach Haucatay Status and receive $7.50 off, and 3,500 points to reach Rocoto Status and receive $10 off.

Getting there: After turning left onto Nexton Square Drive, turn left again when you see Poogan’s Southern Kitchen + Viva Chicken is up ahead. Luckily, there’s plenty of parking.

Things to know if you go:

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