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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in North Charleston, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in North Charleston:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in North Charleston, SC

New North Charleston pedestrian bridge connects Riverfront Park

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – After two years of construction, the Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge is now complete, and Wednesday, a ceremony was held to officially open the bridge.Connecting the past to the present.“We had a golf course that was on both sides when the Navy was here and we took that away to make a park for the public,” North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey said. “This is an extension of that park on this side of the river, but we had no way to access it unless you went out on the road.&...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – After two years of construction, the Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge is now complete, and Wednesday, a ceremony was held to officially open the bridge.

Connecting the past to the present.

“We had a golf course that was on both sides when the Navy was here and we took that away to make a park for the public,” North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey said. “This is an extension of that park on this side of the river, but we had no way to access it unless you went out on the road.”

In 2020, North Charleston leadership wanted to build a bridge that connects Riverfront Park with the north side of Noisette Creek, but not just any bridge.

“We came up with the idea let’s build a bridge that’s unlike any other bridge in the word,” Summey said.

Two years later, that’s exactly what they’ve done.

“This bridge has been ranked the number six bridge in the world for pedestrian walking,” Summey said, “and that’s quite an accomplishment, so we’re proud to be able to have that.”

The 230-foot bridge that has two 55-foot-tall steel arches is special for many reasons, including the one person who was instrumental in making the project come to fruition.

“Ray Anderson,” Summey said, “who worked with me and passed away about six, seven weeks ago, had most to do of anybody in the city on this project. He was out here all the time and then come back to report to me.”

Anderson served as Mayor Summey’s special assistant for 27 years and he will soon be honored for his commitment to ensuring the bridge was complete.

“Later we will come back out and name the bridge after Ray Anderson,” Summey said.

Now that the bridge has connected the past to the present, Mayor Summey says this new structure is the start of a bright future for North Charleston.

“We’re going to create a community,” he said, “a whole community, on this base from the commercial node or the industrial node, all the way down through until we get back to Park Circle. Eventually, we’ll see high-rises, hotels, apartment complexes and businesses located on this track.”

'Absolutely gorgeous': Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge now open to public

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — North Charleston hosted a grand opening on Wednesday for a new structure designed to lead pedestrians into the city’s future.The Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge is officially open.The close-to-$8-million project took two years of const...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — North Charleston hosted a grand opening on Wednesday for a new structure designed to lead pedestrians into the city’s future.

The Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge is officially open.

The close-to-$8-million project took two years of construction and design.

"When it's lit up at night, it's absolutely gorgeous," said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey. "There's not another one like it in the world. It's just been named by a magazine of designers, the seventh most beautiful walking bridge in the world. And so we're very pleased with that."

The Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge connects Riverfront Park to the north side of Noisette Creek.

"You can have family parties. You can have a wedding ceremony."

Mayor Summey says this is part of the city’s overall vision for the development of the former Navy base.

"This will not be industrial within the next five to 10 years. It will be high-rise apartments, hotels, and shopping events. It’s going to be great for the community, but yet we will have the park right here next to parking garages, and it connects to the other side where we're starting within the next six months or so selling lots, selling the old houses to be restored and open that housing area back up that hasn’t been open in 25, 26 years," Mayor Summey said.

Ray Anderson, special assistant to the mayor, helped lead the effort to finish this bridge.

Mayor Summey says the city will name the span after him.

"Ray Anderson was one of my assistants in charge of this project for me, and he passed away about two months ago unexpectedly, so it's wonderful to be out here tonight. I just feel like he's with us as well," Mayor Summey said.

Now that the bridge is open, the mayor says it's for everyone in North Charleston and visitors to enjoy.

"It will start and it will eventually transfer into something that I may not be here when it's all finished, but I can tell you my heart's in it. My wife has been in it, and I'll be recovering it somewhere and enjoying it." Mayor Summey said.

Eveon Containers Inc. Proudly Selects Charleston, SC for Their North American Headquarters

This press release is submitted and shown here in its original form, unedited by Furniture Today.Charleston, SC – ...

This press release is submitted and shown here in its original form, unedited by Furniture Today.

Charleston, SCEveon Containers Inc. is proud to announce it has selected the Lowcountry as their North American headquarters. A global provider of sustainable building, shipping and storage solutions, Eveon has European headquarters in Rotterdam, Netherlands and operations in Germany and Canada. The company, which launched in the US with three hubs the summer of 2021, is experiencing rapid growth reflective of the demand for sustainable online container options. Eveon can now provide decommissioned containers from 30 nationwide hubs.

The privately held start-up sells decommissioned 20ft, 40ft & 40ft HC High Cube shipping containers online, hoping to change the way consumers looking for storage needs or transportation for goods perceive the Conex dry box. Generally ignored as they rumble down the highway, Eveon’s goal is for consumers to give these used steel and wood containers a second life on land. Shipping containers are available for purchase 24/7 online with delivery available within a few hundred miles of each of the 30 hubs across the country, from Long Beach to Newark.

“We don’t just sell containers, we sell opportunities for customers to launch a business, start a pop-up restaurant or simply to save money on storage,” said Eveon CEO, Aad Storm. “With 45 million containers in the world, our goal is to recycle, repurpose and reduce emissions one container at a time. We believe these containers once retired from sea, can serve another purpose on land.”

Launched in 2019, the global start-up sees the coastal city of Charleston as an ideal match, both professionally and culturally. While 4,262 miles apart, Charleston and Rotterdam share many unique similarities including being steeped in history, having a reputation for being friendly, and both thriving port cities. Eveon’s native country of The Netherlands, or Nederland in Dutch, literally translates as “Low Land” or “Lowcountry.”

“Rotterdam is the tenth largest port in the world and like Charleston, our economy and business environment depend on the waterways. Being near the port and on east coast times are both logical moves for Eveon,” Storm noted.

Eveon has already begun operating out of Charleston, continuing best of class sourcing and delivery of containers across the country within 5-10 business days. As part of its US expansion, it has filled local Marketing & Communications, Customer Service and Logistics positions both locally within Charleston and nationally.

“We want customers to find our business as warm and approachable as the ‘Holy City.’ We look forward to what the future entails and bringing a little of the Charleston way and approachability to our global brand. As we expand across the country, we can’t think of a better city for our US team to call home.”

About Eveon Containers Inc. Eveon’s convenient online webshop provides 24/7 purchasing options for sustainable 20ft & 40ft Shipping Containers. We proudly offer a 30-Day Money Back Guarantee, upfront pricing, military discounts & fast delivery. For more information or to learn about our commitment sustainability visit Eveon Containers Inc.

Businesses soon to be displaced as North Charleston redevelops former Navy base

NORTH CHARLESTON — Elizabeth and Chris Fisher moved their glass recycling company into an old warehouse on the former Charleston Naval Base around 2006. They were expecting to be an integral part in the city’s plan for transforming the old military complex into a vibrant, mixed-use community along the Cooper River.“We were going to be the place where Noisette people were going to bring their recycling,” said Elizabeth Fisher, referring to North Charleston’s massive Noisette master plan that sought to rede...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Elizabeth and Chris Fisher moved their glass recycling company into an old warehouse on the former Charleston Naval Base around 2006. They were expecting to be an integral part in the city’s plan for transforming the old military complex into a vibrant, mixed-use community along the Cooper River.

“We were going to be the place where Noisette people were going to bring their recycling,” said Elizabeth Fisher, referring to North Charleston’s massive Noisette master plan that sought to redevelop several hundred acres across the base. That plan, announced two decades ago, ended in foreclosure.

Now, more than 15 years since its arrival, Fisher Recycling is having to find a new home.

North Charleston is preparing to demolish the city-owned, 84,000-square-foot warehouse at 2750 Avenue B, home to Fisher and a handful of artisans and locally owned businesses, as part of a plan to transform the northern end of the base.

The Fishers, who relocated years ago from Mount Pleasant to Park Circle, have grown attached to the community, Elizabeth Fisher said. Additionally, the area is conveniently located near the bustling Interstate 526. The couple believes the city’s redevelopment plans will be a positive change for the community. They also acknowledged that the municipality has worked to help the recycling business find a new place to do business.

The couple just wishes they could stay in the neighborhood to be part of the upcoming change.

“It definitely is for the better for the city from a revenue standpoint,” Elizabeth Fisher said. “But I won’t sugarcoat it. I’d rather stay here.”

Fisher Recycling and several other locally owned businesses, including a bike shop, beverage and snack distributor, furniture maker and a carpenter, must vacate the warehouse by the end of January.

Locating a new space to do business has been challenging, particularly for those who want to remain in North Charleston, where rent and property values are becoming more expensive.

Property costs have risen dramatically over the past decade in the city’s Park Circle area, now a booming enclave of new apartments, restaurants, recreational spaces and single-family houses.

Additionally, industrial properties are becoming increasingly rare in North Charleston, long a haven for the manufacturing industry.

Near the former Navy complex the city is considering rezoning a handful of industrial parcels to general business, a decision that was met with opposition from several of the properties’ owners during the Oct. 10 Planning Commission meeting.

Chris Fisher said he plans to ask city officials at a committee meeting next month to allow one of the lots along Rivers Avenue to remain industrial so that the recycling business could use the site as its new home.

The city’s plans for the old base aren’t a surprise. Occupants on the northern end have known for years of the city’s intentions to revitalize that section of the complex.

Some companies have already moved. Others have remained, with some hoping that the Navy base redevelopment plans would continue to stall as they had for more than a decade.

But reality began to settle in last year when construction crews began installing the new, winding pedestrian bridge at Noisette Creek.

Businesses in the warehouse then received letters in June informing them of a Dec. 31 deadline, and that the city would not charge them rent for the remainder of the year, said city spokesman Ryan Johnson. The December deadline has since been extended to the end of January.

“It’s been no secret that the redevelopment was going to happen,” Johnson said.

The occupied warehouse sits beside an abandoned storage space that will also be demolished. Both are located at the foot of the bridge.

The city’s vision calls for the transformation of about 90 acres at the foot of the bridge to include a fishing pier along Noisette Creek, condos, restaurants, green space and possibly a water taxi. About 60 of those acres are owned by the city, while the rest is currently occupied by the federal government, a nonprofit and a brewery.

Cities with the most home value appreciation in South Carolina

Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of September 2022. The charts in this story were created automatically using Matplotlib. The most expensive city on the list has a typical home value of $3,548,993 which is 1,086% higher than the state a...

Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of September 2022. The charts in this story were created automatically using Matplotlib. The most expensive city on the list has a typical home value of $3,548,993 which is 1,086% higher than the state average of $299,173.

Metros with the most cities in the top 30 in South Carolina#1. Charleston-North Charleston, SC: 14#2. Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC: 5#3. Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC: 3#3. Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC: 3#5. Greenville-Anderson, SC: 2#6. Columbia, SC: 1#6. Georgetown, SC: 1#6. Seneca, SC: 1

Read on to see which cities made the list.

#30. Six Mile

– Typical home value: $401,797– 1-year price change: +25.6%– 5-year price change: +56.6%– Metro area: Greenville-Anderson, SC

#29. North Myrtle Beach

– Typical home value: $411,008– 1-year price change: +32.9%– 5-year price change: +84.1%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC

#28. Clover

– Typical home value: $417,035– 1-year price change: +23.4%– 5-year price change: +72.7%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC

#27. Chapin

– Typical home value: $439,894– 1-year price change: +23.7%– 5-year price change: +60.4%– Metro area: Columbia, SC

#26. Saint Helena Island

– Typical home value: $459,710– 1-year price change: +36.5%– 5-year price change: +72.5%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

#25. Pinopolis

– Typical home value: $468,088– 1-year price change: +17.7%– 5-year price change: +72.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#24. Hollywood

– Typical home value: $475,989– 1-year price change: +24.2%– 5-year price change: +68.2%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#23. Bluffton

– Typical home value: $477,569– 1-year price change: +30.1%– 5-year price change: +72.4%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

#22. Surfside Beach

– Typical home value: $482,270– 1-year price change: +30.9%– 5-year price change: +84.7%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC

#21. Pawleys Island

– Typical home value: $494,053– 1-year price change: +28.4%– 5-year price change: +63.5%– Metro area: Georgetown, SC

#20. Salem

– Typical home value: $509,521– 1-year price change: +28.6%– 5-year price change: +84.1%– Metro area: Seneca, SC

#19. Ravenel

– Typical home value: $511,699– 1-year price change: +23.8%– 5-year price change: +80.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#18. Fort Mill

– Typical home value: $512,577– 1-year price change: +24.8%– 5-year price change: +70.3%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC

#17. Charleston

– Typical home value: $529,058– 1-year price change: +23.4%– 5-year price change: +65.5%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#16. Tega Cay

– Typical home value: $557,175– 1-year price change: +23.1%– 5-year price change: +82.3%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC

#15. Edisto Beach

– Typical home value: $624,491– 1-year price change: +20.7%– 5-year price change: +51.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#14. Wadmalaw Island

– Typical home value: $644,313– 1-year price change: +28.1%– 5-year price change: +67.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#13. Awendaw

– Typical home value: $650,655– 1-year price change: +22.4%– 5-year price change: +54.8%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#12. Okatie

– Typical home value: $667,687– 1-year price change: +31.6%– 5-year price change: +67.5%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

#11. Meggett

– Typical home value: $716,086– 1-year price change: +23.3%– 5-year price change: +57.8%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#10. Mount Pleasant

– Typical home value: $759,596– 1-year price change: +26.6%– 5-year price change: +65.2%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#9. Hilton Head Island

– Typical home value: $769,280– 1-year price change: +32.0%– 5-year price change: +84.6%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

#8. Seabrook Island

– Typical home value: $886,593– 1-year price change: +32.7%– 5-year price change: +79.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#7. Briarcliffe Acres

– Typical home value: $917,680– 1-year price change: +33.9%– 5-year price change: +93.3%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC

#6. Sunset

– Typical home value: $1,260,785– 1-year price change: +37.1%– 5-year price change: +69.5%– Metro area: Greenville-Anderson, SC

#5. Folly Beach

– Typical home value: $1,364,941– 1-year price change: +32.7%– 5-year price change: +88.7%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#4. Isle of Palms

– Typical home value: $1,675,689– 1-year price change: +36.1%– 5-year price change: +93.8%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#3. Kiawah Island

– Typical home value: $1,902,975– 1-year price change: +34.3%– 5-year price change: +69.7%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

#2. Sheldon

– Typical home value: $2,407,403– 1-year price change: +32.6%– 5-year price change: +59.5%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

#1. Sullivans Island

– Typical home value: $3,548,993– 1-year price change: +33.7%– 5-year price change: +94.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

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