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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Pineville, NC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Pineville:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Pineville, NC

South Charlotte residents push back on apartment expansion plan

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A push for more housing in south Charlotte is getting pushback from neighbors.Developer Goldberg Companies Inc. proposed adding 212 units to Legacy Arboretum Apartments in south CharlotteNeighbors say the expansion would bring more traffic to an already congested areaThe proposal as it stands would also cut down a significant amount of tree canopyThe developer will take more time to consider community concerns before presenting an updated proposal to city councilGoldberg Companies In...

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A push for more housing in south Charlotte is getting pushback from neighbors.

Developer Goldberg Companies Inc. proposed adding 212 units to Legacy Arboretum Apartments in south Charlotte

Neighbors say the expansion would bring more traffic to an already congested area

The proposal as it stands would also cut down a significant amount of tree canopy

The developer will take more time to consider community concerns before presenting an updated proposal to city council

Goldberg Companies Inc., an Ohio-based developer, wants to add more than 200 units to Legacy Arboretum Apartments off Pineville-Matthews Road that would nearly double the number of residents who live there.

Kevin MacVean, the attorney representing Goldberg, told the city council in last week's zoning meeting his client is considering input from residents.

Longtime neighbors say that will bring more traffic to an already congested area. Tom Seddon describes the commute in front of Providence High School and nearby Elizabeth Lane Elementary as a nightmare during the school year.

“You’ve got one thing backing up into another thing, backing into another thing,” Seddon said. “Like you do here where one school hits another school and hits another school then hits a really busy intersection in Matthews.”“You’ve got one thing backing up into another thing, backing into another thing,” Seddon said. “Like you do here where one school hits another school and hits another school then hits a really busy intersection in Matthews.”

His daughter attended Elizabeth Lane. He’s lived in the area for 10 years and says the drive from his home to the high school takes two minutes during the summer, but it’s a 20-minute drive in the fall.

Goldberg’s plans would also take away tree canopy in the area, which Seddon says goes against the city’s goal to preserve the environment.

“In the 2040 Plan it is one of the key things is to preserve the natural environment and integrate that into the built environment,” he said.

The developer has adjusted its original proposal, reducing the total number of projected units from 500 to 478. Seddon says that’s not enough.

“I guess it’s a nice sign they appear that they need to listen,” he said. “I’m not sure that they’ve listened hard enough just yet.”

The attorney representing the developer did say it's willing to cooperate with the community at last week’s zoning hearing.

Councilman Ed Driggs recently told residents the developer will also take more time to consider community concerns.

The earliest council can vote on the new proposal is Sept. 19.

Public Records for Week of July 14, 2022

Land TransfersThe following land transfers were filed with the Davie Register of Deeds, listed by parties involved, acreage, location and deed stamps purchased, with $2 representing $1,000. nting $1,000.– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, .62 acre, Fulton Township.– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, tracts.– Easystreet Properties to DME Elite Properties, 12.73 acres, Milling Road, Mocksville, $712.– Thom...

Land Transfers

The following land transfers were filed with the Davie Register of Deeds, listed by parties involved, acreage, location and deed stamps purchased, with $2 representing $1,000. nting $1,000.

– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, .62 acre, Fulton Township.

– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, tracts.

– Easystreet Properties to DME Elite Properties, 12.73 acres, Milling Road, Mocksville, $712.

– Thomas Murphy Hooker Jr. to Caroline S. Harrell and James L. Springer Jr., 5.01 acres, Peoples Creek Road, Advance, $1,400.

– Scott A. Jackson and Heather L. Jackson to Joseph Michael Robinson, Brianna Irene Lookabill and Amber Jay Link, 1 acre, Pineville Road, Farmington, $260.

– HPA II Borrower 2019-1 to Eugene Wayne Faircloth and Heather Nicole Johnson, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance, $700.

– Michael T. Munley to Gerald L. Blout and Carolyn S. Blout, 1 villa, Oak Valley, Advance, $890.

– Stephanie Moore Boyce to Jacob Neil and Holly Whitfield, .9 acre, Shady Grove Township, $652.

– Victoria Pless to Joyce B. Bullard, tract, Farmington Township, $356.

– Third Generation Homes to Malcolm Marks and Sharon Marks, 1 lot, Myers Ridge, $1,050.

– Comfort Quality Homes to Aaron L. Hopping and Dannielle C. Hopping, .47 acre, Mocksville Township, $470.

– Charles A. Elmore and Linda D. Elmore to Kevin Mabe and Sherry Mabe, .8 acre, $40.

– Jay S. Matlock to David Lee Dodder and Melissa Dawn Dodder, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance, $900.

– Sherman Desi Arnold to Michael Seamon and Virginia Seamon, 1 lot, Craftwood, Mocksville, $150.

– D.R. Horton Inc. to Kathy Lynn Atkins and Debra Jane Parsons, 1 lot, Highland Place, $564.

– D.R. Horton Inc. to Ruben Gallegos and Christine Melissa Gallegos, 1 lot, Highland Place, $624.

– Earnhardt and Russ Builders to Sue Earnhardt, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township.

– Dalton Realty to Clarence L. Dalton III and Alice P. Dalton, 2.4 acres, Fulton Township.

– Anthony J. Cameron Sr. and Robin Elaine Cameron to Anthony J. Cameron II, 1 lot, Farmington Township.

– Reverse Mortgage Funding to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, 1 lot, Fieldcrest Subdivision.

– Wilmington Savings Fund to Rosa Elva Santiago Martinez and Alejandro Mejia Bustos, 1 lot, Fieldcrest Subdivision, $230.

– Angela Warner, trustee to Cameron Warner, part of 2 lots, Mocksville Township.

– Jeffery Eaton and Ann Eaton to Larry Preston Dishmond, 1 lot, Sheffield Acres, Clarksville Township, $613.

– Vanessa Berrios to Anibal Tomas Pestamo-Aguilo, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance.

– Wanda Jean Bailey and Bruce Bailey, Mitchell Loren Wolford and Carla L. Wolford, and Michael Lawrence Wolford and Dale Lee Wolford to Sigifredo Acevedo Gama and Jazmine Acevedo, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $376.

– Mitchell L. Link and Stephanie Link to MCM Holdings SC, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township, $216.

– Angela Dawn Tedder to Angela Dawn Tedder and Jason Christopher Tedder, 3 lots, Woodland Subdivision, Mocksville Township.

– Brenda Joyner Legg to Angela Dawn Tedder, 1 villa, Milling Way, Mocksville.

– Zoobie Holdings to Michael H. Forman and Stephanie T. Forman, trustees, .87 acre, Kinderton Place, Farmington Township, $2,750.

– Julianne O. Hanes to Joseph M. Miles and Jane V. Miles, 10.13 acres, $530.

– James C. Winchester IV to FKH SFR Propco K, 1 lot, Redland Way, Farmington Township, $845.

– Christopher Andrew Vest and Stephanie Myers Vest to Kenneth S. White, .52 acre, $30.

– Grace Smith Hoots to Jamie Richard White and Wendi Jones White, .25 acre, Calahaln Township.

– Grace Smith Hoots to Jamie R. White and Melissa W. Hill, tract, Calahaln Township.

– Jacob Nisley to Ragland Holdings, 1.78 acres, Calahaln Township, $490.

– Bobby Joe McDaniels and Deborah S. McDaniels to Sujit Naik, tract, Pineville Road, Farmington, $40.

– Marklin Family Properties to Neil R. Menius, 3 lots, Mocksville Township, $40.

– Barry Dean Hauser to Barry Dean Hauser and Kristy Diane Owens, 1.65 acres.

– Charles S. King and Chantal King to ABCS Holdings, tracts, Mocksville Township, $374.

– Braxton Real Estate and Development to D.R. Horton Inc., tracts, Highlands Place, $2,697.

– Lena Renee Makas and Jerry Wayne Makas to Carlos Villatoro Bonilla, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $276.

Arrests

The following were arrested by the Davie County Sheriff’s Office.

July 9: Marlene Odili Alvarenga Medina, 32, of E. Lake Drive, Mocksville, fleeing to elude arrest in a vehicle, reckless driving, DWI, driving left of center, misdemeanor child abuse.

July 8: Debora Renae Osborne, 63, of Juney Beauchamp Road, Advance, misuse of 911 system.

July 7: James Timothy Benfield, 46, of Hamptonville, failure to appear in court; Damien Botteon, 54, of Salisbury, failure to appear in court; Derrick Deangelo Jones, 57, of Marconi St., Mocksville, second-degree sexual offense; Douglas Lee Little, 36, of US 601 N., Mocksville, probation violations, failure to appear in court; Mandie Michelle O’Neal, 47, of Creason Road, Mocksville, felony probation violation; James Joshua Rogers, 42, of Juniors Way, Mocksville, breaking, entering and larceny.

July 6: Michael Wayne Horne, 40, of Salisbury, failure to appear in court; Amy Lynn Lilly, 46, of Duke St., Cooleemee, communicating threats; Christopher James Saul, 47 of Ruffin, failure to appear in court.

July 5: Michael Eugene Jackson, 25, of Mt. Airy, breaking, entering and larceny; Phillip Craig Robertson, 45, of Yadkinville, larceny; Cody Scott Tharpe, 35, of S. Main St., Mocksville, violation of court order.

Sheriff’s Office

The following are from Davie County Sheriff’s Office reports.

July 9: domestic disturbance, NC 801 S., Advance; disturbing the peace, Mountview Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, NC 801 S., Mocksville; fireworks, Deer Run Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Thousand Trails Drive, Advance; disturbance, W. Kinderton Way, Bermuda Run; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, NC 801 S., Mocksville; larceny, Cooper Creek DRive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious package, Beauchamp Road, Advance; trespassing, Wall St., Mocksville; harassment, US 601 S., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Pepperstone Place, Mocksville; larceny, Ivy Circle, Bermuda Run; damage to property, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, FArmington Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Mr. Henry Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Meadowview Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Four Corners Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Legion Hut Road, Mocksvile; suspicious activity, Martin Luther King Jr. Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mocksville.

July 8: suspicious activity, Speaks Road, Advance; disturbance, US 158, Bermuda Run; harassment, Bridgewater Drive, Bermuda Run; fraud, Crepe Myrtle Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Junction Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Duke St., Cooleemee; larceny, James Road, Advance; disturbance, Northridge Court, Advance; assault, Willhaven Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Swicegood St., Mocksville; disturbance, Juney Beauchamp Road, Advance; suspicious activity, Salisbury Road, Mocksville.

July 7: domestic disturbance, Creekside Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, N. Main St., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Eastcoast Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; harassmetn, Watt St., Cooleemee; domestic assist, Nolley Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Casa Bella Drive, Advance; trespassing, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; trespassing, Galadrim Way, Advance; larceny, Madison Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Northridge Court, Mocksville; disturbance, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; harassment, W. Kinderton Way, Bermuda Run; disturbance, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; assault, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; disturbance, W. Brickwalk Court, Mocksville; harassment, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; burglary, Redland Road, Mocksville; runaway, Shutt Road, Advance; suspicious activity, Meadowview Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Will Boone Road, Mocksville.

July 6: suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mcoksville; larceny, Woodlee Drive, Advance; disturbance, Calvin Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, Golfview Drive, Bermuda Run; disturbance, Gladstone Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Milling Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Hospital St., Mocksville; fraud, North Forke Drive, Bermuda Run; larceny, NC 801 S., Cooleemee; suspicious activity, Abbey Lane, Mocksville; fraud, E. Depot St., Mocksville; burglary, Powell Road, Mocksville; larceny, Fireside Lane, Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, Pointe House Lane, Mocksville; larceny, Sheffield Road, Harmony; suspiciuos activity, US 64 W., Mocksville; suspicious package, Government Center Drive, Mocksville.

July 5: suspicious activity, Cummings Lane, Mocksville; harassment, Speer Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Fairfield Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Guinevere Lane, Mocksville; disturbance, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; damage to property, US 64 E., Mcoksville; damage to property, Clark Road, Mocksville; larceny, Elrica Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mcoksville; fraud, N. Main St., Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 S., Bermuda Run; harassment, Boxwood Church Road, Mocksville; harassment, Fulton Road, Advance; suspicious activity, N. Main St., Mocksville; larceny, Underpass Road, Advance; suspicious activity, N. Main St., Mocksville; harassment, Hobson Drive, Mocksville.

July 4: fireworks, Kelly Ave., Mocksville; fireworks, Childrens Home Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Dutchman Trail, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Farmington Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Shiloh Court, Mocksville; suspicioius activity, Allen Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Underpass Road, Advance; fireworks, Riverbend Drive, Bermuda Run; fireworks, Ponderosa Drive, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; fireworks, Bermuda Run Drive, Bermuda Run; larceny, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; fraud, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; larceny, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; fraud, US 64 E., Mocksville; disturbance, Creason Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Madison Road, Mocksville; larceny, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Juney Beauchamp Road, Advance; fraud, Bing Crosby Blvd., Bermuda Run; damage to property, Boone Lane, Mocksville; suspicious activity, I-40MM170, Mocksville; larceny, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; fireworks, Sain Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Will Boone Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Marginal St., Cooleemee; fireworks, NC 801 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Fox Trot Lane, Mocksville; fireworkds, Camden Point Court, Mocksville; fireworks, Pointe House Lane, Mocksville; fireworks, Underpass Road, Advance; disturbance, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Cana Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Bermuda Village Drive, Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, I-40 MM 177; noise complaint, Dutchman Trail, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Hobson Drive, Mocksville.

July 3: suspicious activity, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, US 601 N., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; damage to property, US 601 S., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Mullins Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cornatzer Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Ijames Church Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 601 N., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Hobson Drive, Mocksville;p fireworks, Foxdale Court, Mocksville; noise complaint, Mountview Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Watt St., Cooleemee.

More News

‘I have nothing left’: Families displaced after flames gut Pineville apartments

PINEVILLE, N.C. — Dozens of firefighters were called to battle a massive apartment fire that left several families displaced early Monday in Pineville.The fast-moving flames broke out just after midnight at the apartment complex along Plum Creek Lane, near Johnston and Park roads.Channel 9 crews on the scene could see intense flames shooting from the apartment units and second-floor balconies as firefighters tried to get the blaze under control.Tenants were forced to flee their homes but officials told Channel 9 th...

PINEVILLE, N.C. — Dozens of firefighters were called to battle a massive apartment fire that left several families displaced early Monday in Pineville.

The fast-moving flames broke out just after midnight at the apartment complex along Plum Creek Lane, near Johnston and Park roads.

Channel 9 crews on the scene could see intense flames shooting from the apartment units and second-floor balconies as firefighters tried to get the blaze under control.

Tenants were forced to flee their homes but officials told Channel 9 that no injuries were reported.

Within minutes, dozens of firefighters from Pineville and Charlotte arrived and immediately went door to door, trying to get neighbors out.

“I probably would have ended up dead if they hadn’t knocked on my door and woke me up, baby,” said resident Barbra Burch. “I’m going to my girlfriend’s house. I guess you got to take me shopping or go shopping for me because I ain’t got no clothes except for my gown. Oh Lord, have mercy.”

Many residents grabbed what they could, and then watched their homes burn while they stood outside in the frigid weather.

Channel 9 spoke with Arritta Pruitt, a resident at the apartment complex.

“My apartment is gone,” Pruitt said. “There’s nothing…it’s gone.”

Pruitt took a deep breath and pointed to what had been her home for seven years, until Sunday night.

“Someone knocked on my door -- they were knocking on everyone’s door screaming, ‘Fire! Fire! Get out, get out,’” she said.

Fire officials said at least 16 apartment units were destroyed or damaged. Those units were unlivable.

The night was breathing fire and spitting smoke into the darkness as the Pineville Fire Department told Channel 9 they struggled to get enough water pressure into their lines. Flames raced from one end of the building to the other.

“It was like trinklets of water and it just took a while,” Pruitt said. “It started on that end down there and everything burned down.”

“This is scary, this is scary stuff,” Burch said. “And everything I owned is up in that apartment, burnt up.”

Channel 9 crews could see dozens of people standing outside as the fire burned, and firefighters were still working to put out hot spots around 2 a.m.

“I have nothing left but what I have in my car and on my back,” said resident Ashawnda Martin.

(WATCH BELOW: Reporter Anthony Kustura’s LIVE updates from the scene)

Several CATS busses were brought to the complex to help keep those displaced warm. The American Red Cross was also called to help those who may have lost so much, right before the holidays.

“Hopefully, they can still celebrate a little bit and be cheerful around this time,” said witness Lana Gibson.

“That’s what we are going to focus on next, salvage some things that are near and dear to them,” said Pineville Fire Chief Mike Gerin. “You know, they face these challenges being displaced, so if we can give a little back to them, that’s our main focus now.”

Gerin said he was one of the first firemen to arrive.

“I know there was water coming off the hydrant,” Gerin said. “I can’t tell you exactly how many gallons per minute was coming off the hydrant, but at the end of the day, do I wish I had an infinite amount of water? Yes, 100%.”

At least 12 people were displaced by the fire, which destroyed 14 units, according to the Red Cross.

“I’m in good spirits because I’m still here,” Pruitt said. “I can replace all those things. There are things I can’t replace, but I’m here.”

The Pineville Fire Department was investigating what could have sparked the fire. Channel 9 asked about the reason for low water pressure and officials did not seem to know just yet. The apartment complex has its own hydrant system which they’re in charge of maintaining, but there is no information yet saying if that was a factor.

“At the end of the day, we consider it a win when there’s no loss of life, there’s no injuries,” Gerin said. “Buildings can be rebuilt. Lives cannot.”

Pineville apartment fire A massive apartment fire left more than a dozen families displaced Monday, Nov. 15, 2021. (WSOC)

Resident Jackie Black said there has been issues with the water pressure in the past.

“Yes, a lot. A lot,” Black said. “About three times a month the water will be cut off all day.”

Check back with wsoctv.com for updates on this story.

(WATCH BELOW: Massive fire destroys several apartment units in Pineville)

Massive fire destroys several apartment units in Pineville

©2021 Cox Media Group

I-485 outer loop fully reopened after truck runs off roadway

PINEVILLE, N.C. — All lanes of the Interstate 485 outer loop in south Charlotte between Interstate 77 and South Boulevard have reopened following a crash late Monday morning.A tractor-trailer partially drove off the road near the overpass with Westinghouse Boulevard, a photo from the North Carolina Department of Transportation shows.No one was injured in the crash, according to Medic. No other vehicles could be see...

PINEVILLE, N.C. — All lanes of the Interstate 485 outer loop in south Charlotte between Interstate 77 and South Boulevard have reopened following a crash late Monday morning.

A tractor-trailer partially drove off the road near the overpass with Westinghouse Boulevard, a photo from the North Carolina Department of Transportation shows.

No one was injured in the crash, according to Medic. No other vehicles could be seen in the photo provided by NCDOT.

The outer loop carries traffic towards Pineville. At their height, delays stretched back to the I-485 exit with South Tryon Street.

The inner loop lanes remained open to traffic.

It was not immediately known publicly what caused the crash.

Rainy conditions overnight through Monday morning have saturated roadways, and as can be seen in the NCDOT photo, caused loose and muddy ground along the roadway shoulder.

Drivers are advised to look for the ponding of water on area roadways.

This section of roadway is currently under construction to add toll lanes for the future I-485 express lane project.

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New Pineville school immerses all students in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English

Inside a newly-renovated building in a Pineville shopping center, you’ll hear young children learning in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English.ILIM School, short for the International Language Immersion Montessori School, offers a new twist on a growing educational option. Language immersion means classes are conducted in the language students are trying to learn.ILIM students also learn about global cultures. Dina Ahmed, Arabic teacher who came fro...

Inside a newly-renovated building in a Pineville shopping center, you’ll hear young children learning in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English.

ILIM School, short for the International Language Immersion Montessori School, offers a new twist on a growing educational option. Language immersion means classes are conducted in the language students are trying to learn.

ILIM students also learn about global cultures. Dina Ahmed, Arabic teacher who came from Dubai, recently told her students about the drummer in many Arabic-speaking countries who awakens people before dawn during Ramadan, when Muslims fast between sunrise and sunset.

"In Arabic we would say, ‘Esha ya nayem,’ " she said, clapping to demonstrate the rhythm. "This means, 'Wake up, everyone asleep, just wake up to eat something and then just off to work!' "

She offers the English translation only when the children aren’t in the room. When they’re present she speaks only in Arabic, using props and body language to help them understand.

Immersion is booming

As strange as that may seem to many adults, it’s an increasingly common experience for children, says Donna Podgorny. She’s an officer in a national network of language immersion educators and works for Union County Public Schools.

"It’s just really exploded exponentially in the last 15, 20 years because people have seen the great benefits of learning another language," Podgorny said.

Last year the American Councils for International Education tallied more than 3,600 public schools in America offering language immersion, including 229 in North Carolina.

Union County, for instance, offers Spanish and Mandarin. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools offers dual-immersion programs, where students learn in English half the day and Spanish the other half. That’s fairly common across the country.

CMS also has a magnet school that offers immersion in four world languages. But students who enroll pick only one of them.

At ILIM School, students learn in all four languages every day.

"I’m not familiar with those kind of programs," Podgorny said. "That would be new to me."

But she also notes that around the world, most children grow up learning several languages at the same time.

How it began

ILIM School was created by Dria Etienne, a mother of three who works in commercial real estate and development. Her husband is in finance, and they travel globally for work and pleasure. Plus his family is Haitian: "They speak Creole. They speak French. They speak Spanish and they speak English," Etienne said.

They enrolled their oldest child in a Mandarin immersion charter school in Charlotte, then in a CMS immersion magnet. During the coronavirus pandemic, she home-schooled her son for a year with a Chinese tutor.

Etienne says she also wants her children to learn with Montessori and Reggio Emilia techniques, which emphasize child-centered exploration. She began talking with other families about pooling their resources to start a small school.

"And then it got much larger very quickly, so now we’re in a 38,000-square-foot space," Etienne said.

Etienne says she tapped her business development background to raise $2 million. Investors included prospective parents and people in Charlotte’s international community.

She got a 10-year lease on the space in a shopping center just off I-485 and Highway 51 in Pineville. And she decided to offer immersion in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English because "these are the four most widely spoken languages in the world, and so when we think about developing a global citizen, to be able to go into these dominant languages for the world, that was important."

Doing immersion in more than two languages is uncommon, experts say, but not unheard of. While she was planning her school Etienne visited a private school in Florida that teaches in three languages while using the Montessori method.

UNC Charlotte’s Department of Languages and Culture Studies signed an agreement with ILIM School to provide unpaid interns. Etienne says she leveraged that to overcome the biggest hurdle for any language immersion school: Finding teachers who are fluent in world languages. Institutions of higher education and nonprofit entities that are affiliated with them are exempted from the limit on H1B visas for specialized occupations.

"We’re a for-profit school with a non-profit arm," Etienne said, and that has allowed her school to recruit teachers by offering the visas.

But UNCC spokesperson Buffie Stephens said Tuesday the university was surprised to learn that Etienne was using the partnership that way. The agreement does not extend to UNCC sponsoring or supporting visas for ILIM teachers, she said.

Etienne looks for native speakers who can teach using Montessori and/or Reggio methods. Because the school is private, the teachers don’t have to be licensed in North Carolina.

Start-up challenges

Etienne had planned to open ILIM in September. She says families had put down deposits for about 100 students, with tuition ranging from $15,500 to $17,500 a year depending on age. But delays renovating the building pushed the opening to late November and some families pulled out.

Currently, the school has 56 children, from toddlers to 8-year-olds, and 17 teachers. Etienne says that means she’s subsidizing operations from the money raised for opening, but she expects to hit her break-even point of 80 students next year.

Etienne eventually hopes to enroll 180 students in preschool and elementary grades, then expand into middle school.

Two of the current students are the children of Jillian Wegner, who teaches in the UNCC Languages and Culture Studies program. Wegner speaks German, Spanish and English, and had already started her daughter in a Spanish immersion public school. She switched when ILIM opened.

"And then now she’s been here for two months and she can count to 50 in both Arabic and Mandarin. She says a lot of phrases at home," Wegner said.

Wegner’s 3-year-old son is also at ILIM, and she hopes he’ll pick up four languages even more readily.

"It’s just really neat to kind of hear them play on their own and you’ll pick up different languages," she said. "And again they’re learning multiple alphabets because it’s not — with Arabic and Mandarin it’s not what we’re used to with English and Spanish being the same alphabet."

Will it stick?

Podgorny, the Union County schools language immersion specialist, says the challenge of learning more than one language is good for a child’s brain development.

"The brain is very capable of learning many languages from an early age," she said.

As for what parents can expect long term, that’s a trickier question. The answer, Podgorny says, depends partly on how long children stick with all four languages and how much exposure they get outside of school. At the least, she says, exposing children to the four languages means they’re likely to recognize a wider range of sounds and words.

"There’s exposure, there’s familiarity, and then there’s proficiency," she said. "To be proficient in even two languages is a challenge."

Learning to read and write in four languages is an even bigger challenge, especially given the dramatic differences in the way the four are written. The ILIM School has an array of books, posters, maps and hands-on learning materials that feature all four languages.

The school’s mission also focuses on making children more aware of world cultures. Podgorny says that has value in itself and is part of what drives the language immersion movement.

"I think people are very aware of the power that language can give us," she said, "how it can make us more capable and hopefully more sympathetic and understanding of other cultures."

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