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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Richburg, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Richburg:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Richburg, SC

Giti Tire responds to local leaders’ complaints of unfair treatment at SC plant

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.“Giti Tire is proud to call South C...

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.

David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.

The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.

Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.

“Giti Tire is proud to call South Carolina home to our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility where dedicated team members produce high-quality, American-made tires. We’ve been able to provide an exceptional array of jobs in Chester County for operators, technicians, polymer experts, engineers in chemical, mechanical, civil, computer science, and electrical fields, administrative, finance and accounting, and many others all while providing strong benefits and competitive salaries.

“As a member of the Chester County community, Giti Tire always welcomes sincere and legitimate input from our team members and other community members. As a core principle, Giti Tire works very hard to ensure we have all the facts and accurate information before taking action. We certainly hope others will also be diligent in confirming the facts and evaluating items coming from parties outside of our Chester County operations who are providing false and misleading information. We recognize this is part of an organized, union-led effort. People who have been a part of our community, and surrounding communities, know that you can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success. These are facts people need to know before even thinking a union is best for them and their families.

“At Giti Tire, we have always recognized that our team members are the strength of our operations and the key to our future success. This was exceptionally clear as the United States reopened from the COVID-19 shutdown. Like many companies, we experienced an increase in demand for our products, requiring a dramatic production response. Our Giti Tire team joined together and sacrificed time and energy to restart operations and serve our customers. Once operations fully restarted and demand normalized, our production and schedules also returned to a more balanced work life experience and we were able to provide a salary increase for many.

“Over the last 20 months, Giti Tire has also increased employee communications and engagement as we have worked to navigate the pandemic. Our 600 employees are our number one priority and most valuable asset. We believe they can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.

“Therefore, we always welcome the opportunity to hear from employees and provide open lines of communications. We also want to ensure citizens in South Carolina know the facts and we look forward to sharing our story. Chester County is an excellent home for Giti Tire. We are continuing to invest in our South Carolina operations as we plan to be here for many years to come.”

A group of concerned citizens walked to the gates of the Giti plant on Nov. 23.

They attempted to hand-deliver a letter signed by a coalition of 27 local leaders, including two S.C. State Representatives, county officials from York and Chester counties, Chester City council members and Chester Mayor Wanda Stringfellow.

They also were joined by representatives of the United Steelworkers Union, which released a statement last March denouncing Giti.

The group was not allowed to leave the letter at the security gate at the entrance to the facility.

A law enforcement officer on the scene took a copy of the letter and promised to contact S.C. State Rep. John King when it had been delivered. As of Tuesday afternoon, King said, to his knowledge, the letter hand not yet reached Giti officials.

The letter, obtained by The Herald, asks for a meeting to discuss unfair working conditions at the plant.

“Workers have reported mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, low wages, and the inability to have time off with their families without retaliation. When workers have raised concerns your company has begun intimidating and even threatening to close the plant if they decide to exercise their right to protected, concerted activity,” the letter reads.

This story was originally published November 30, 2021 3:35 PM.

Gov. Henry McMaster, Lt. Gov. Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster’s Weekly Schedule, March 7, 2022

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Governor Henry McMaster, Lieutenant Governor Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster's schedules for the week of March 7 will include the following:Monday, March 7 at 9:30 AM: Lt. Governor Evette spoke at the YMCA of Greenville’s Annual Day of Giving event, Prisma Health YMCA Branch, 550 Brookwood Point Place, Simpsonville, S.C.Monday, March 7 at 12:00 PM: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Cybersecurity Symposium hosted by South Coast Cyber Center, Tabby Place, 91...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Governor Henry McMaster, Lieutenant Governor Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster's schedules for the week of March 7 will include the following:

Monday, March 7 at 9:30 AM: Lt. Governor Evette spoke at the YMCA of Greenville’s Annual Day of Giving event, Prisma Health YMCA Branch, 550 Brookwood Point Place, Simpsonville, S.C.

Monday, March 7 at 12:00 PM: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Cybersecurity Symposium hosted by South Coast Cyber Center, Tabby Place, 913 Port Republic Street, Beaufort, S.C.

Tuesday, March 8 at 10:00 AM: Gov. McMaster will join the Charleston County Aviation Authority, Explore Charleston, and Breeze Airways for a special announcement, Charleston International Airport, Central Hall, 5500 International Boulevard, Charleston, S.C.

Wednesday, March 9 at 12:15 PM: Gov. McMaster will speak to the South Carolina State Firefighters’ Association luncheon, State House grounds, Columbia, S.C.

Thursday, March 10 at 11:30 AM: Gov. McMaster will present the Order of the Palmetto to Stonewall Richburg, Governor’s Office, State House, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

Saturday, March 12 at 10:00 AM: Lt. Gov. Evette will speak at the Passion FORE Fashion, Empowering our Future Leaders’ Girls Golf event sponsored by First Tee – Upstate South Carolina, The Carolina Country Club, 2355 Carolina Country Club Road, Spartanburg, S.C.

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Gov. Henry McMaster’s Weekly Schedule: February 28, 2022

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Gov. Henry McMaster’s schedule for the week of February 28, 2022, included:

Monday, February 28

2:00 PM: Gov. McMaster and First Lady Peggy McMaster joined the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism for the Tourism Student Awards, Lace House, Governor’s Mansion complex, 803 Richland Street, Columbia, S.C.

4:00 PM: Policy meeting.

6:06 PM: Call with a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives.

Tuesday, March 1

8:30 AM: Gov. McMaster held a COVID-19 briefing call with state agencies.

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, first floor, Columbia, S.C.

10:00 AM: Economic development meeting.

11:00 AM: Policy meeting.

12:15 PM: Media interview.

1:00 PM: Gov. McMaster met with representatives from Clemson University and recognized the National Champion Soccer Team.

1:30 PM: Policy meeting.

2:00 PM: Constituent meeting.

2:30 PM: Policy meeting.

3:00 PM: Constituent meeting.

4:00 PM: Economic development meeting.

5:00 PM: Policy meeting.

6:15 PM: Gov. McMaster and First Lady Peggy McMaster attended the Clemson Day at the State House Reception, The Hall at Senate’s End, 320 Senate Street, Columbia, S.C.

Wednesday, March 2

12:04 PM: Call with a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives.

3:00 PM: Gov. McMaster spoke at the Automotive Summit, Hyatt Regency, Regency Ballroom, 220 N. Main Street, Greenville S.C.

4:15 PM: Economic development meeting.

Thursday, March 3

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, first floor, Columbia, S.C.

9:30 AM: Gov. McMaster held a press conference with law enforcement and agency leaders, State House, north steps, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

12:00 PM: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Greater Indian Land Chamber of Commerce, Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church, 238 Fort Mill Highway, Fort Mill, S.C.

2:00 PM: Gov. McMaster participated in a ribbon cutting, Crossridge One, 3000 WorldReach Drive, Indian Land, S.C.

Friday, March 4

8:45 PM: Gov. McMaster presented the Order of the Palmetto to Stan Smith, honoring his 50-year tennis career and service to Boys & Girls Club, Hilton Head Island community, and South Carolina, Hilton Head Island, S.C.

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Florida dog lost amid SC crash. But thanks to community, Goofuss is now safely home

On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.Firefighters and other emergency...

On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.

There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.

Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.

Firefighters and other emergency workers responded to the crash that night. They looked for the chihuahua that had dashed into the woods.

“He had darted into the woods and we just couldn’t find him,” said T. Melton, chief at Richburg Fire & Rescue. “It was dark.”

The owner of the dog, Jean Powers, was a woman in her 80s from Florida, Melton said. This was not just some dog. It was family.

Powers had adopted the dog years ago and the two had been inseparable.

Powers and family members including John Ladd of Union County, N.C., searched for days for the dog and kept in touch with Melton and others. Firefighters searched and volunteers searched. Chester County Animal Control assisted with a humane trap that was put near the site where the crash happened, Ladd said.

“It was heartbreaking,” Ladd said.

Powers herself stayed in Chester County for days and searched near the scene, said Ladd.

“She was out there looking at age 87,” Ladd said.

Ladd said Powers finally returned to Florida while others continued to look.

Richburg Fire & Rescue posted on its Facebook page -- a page that is a central way of communicating in rural Chester County -- about the missing dog. The word spread as the posts were shared.

Then on Tuesday, more than two weeks after the dog was lost, Melton’s cellphone rang. In a small rural place, people have the fire chief’s number.

It was a lady who works at the BP station near the highway. She told how a Chester County couple had seen the social media postings and believed the missing dog had wandered to their house, Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control officers and firefighters rushed to the home of Amber Moore to see if the dog’s microchip matched the owner.

“Sure enough, it was the same dog,” Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control Director Kelli Simoneau said Jesse Rucker-Roof and Trish Zimmerman from her office confirmed the identity of Goofuss and arranged for the dog to be picked up late Tuesday by Ladd.

Ladd’s wife drove Goofuss all the way to Florida Wednesday.

“So many people pulled together to help out,” Ladd said. “It is just wonderful.”

Powers said in a Facebook posting that her prayers had been answered with Goofuss being found and returned.

“I owe a great deal of thanks to all the people who have made this possible,” Powers wrote.

In a phone interview Thursday from her Florida home, Powers said she and the searchers in Chester County -- a rural county hundreds of miles from her home and located about half way between Charlotte and Columbia-- never gave up, even though after two weeks hope was waning.

“The people there were just wonderful” Powers said.

Powers said Goofuss, age 6, back home in Florida spent the first day relaxing.

“I gave him treats and he’s relaxing” Powers said.

Simoneau of animal control in Chester said the combined efforts of all involved brought a lady from Florida in her 80s her dog after it was lost following a traffic collision. She urged all pet owners to have a microchip placed on a pet so that there is no confusion about if the dog is the right dog.

Goofuss sure was the right dog.

Animal control does the microchip service, Simoneau said.

Richburg is a small place, with less than 1,000 residents but with a busy . It sits in a rural county with around 32,000 residents between Rock Hill and Columbia.

But the people there care about each other and look out for each other.

The job is help people. Work together. That’s what people in rural Chester County did yet again when there was a need, Melton said.

The public, the firefighters, the animal control workers.

“There’s a word for it,” Melton said. “Community.”

This story was originally published August 5, 2022 7:57 AM.

Group Seeks Unionization at Giti Tire's South Carolina Plant

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A coalition including state representatives, pastors and union leaders is asking a tire manufacturer to improve conditions at its South Carolina production facilities, including allowing workers to unionize.Tuesday, a group describing itself as “concerned community members, human rights advocates, clergy, elected officials, political activists, labor union leaders, and educators who are committed to ra...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A coalition including state representatives, pastors and union leaders is asking a tire manufacturer to improve conditions at its South Carolina production facilities, including allowing workers to unionize.

Tuesday, a group describing itself as “concerned community members, human rights advocates, clergy, elected officials, political activists, labor union leaders, and educators who are committed to raising standards” planned to deliver a letter to Phang Wai Yeen, CEO of Giti Tire Manufacturing Ltd., according to a copy of the document provided in advance to The Associated Press.

“Workers have reported mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, low wages and the inability to have time off to spend with their family without retaliation,” according to the letter.

In 2014, Giti officials announced to much fanfare that they would build the Singapore-based company's first U.S. plant in Richburg, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of Columbia, starting production three years later, expecting to make several million tires a year when fully operational. The announcement was the culmination of an effort to make South Carolina the nation’s chief tire manufacturer, with other tire makers in the state including Michelin, Bridgestone, Continental and Trelleborg.

The company was central to a 2019 lawsuit by Democratic state Sen. Dick Harpootlian, who said he wanted to force state Commerce Department officials to reveal details of taxpayer-funded incentives intended to lure businesses, including Giti, to the state. Last year, a judge ruled the Commerce Department had violated the state open-records law by keeping from the public details about millions of dollars in state grants and corporate tax incentives.

The Commerce Department has appealed that order, but Harpootlian told the AP earlier this year that he hopes both sides can work out the situation.

Tuesday's letter includes signatures from several labor unions. Those include the United Steelworkers, which already represents some South Carolina workers at Liberty Steel in Georgetown but does not have a contingent at Giti, though members have demonstrated outside the facility before.

Earlier this year, the union criticized the tire maker for “misspending millions in COVID-19 stimulus funds.” That critique followed a report accusing Giti of taking nearly $10 million in federal Paycheck Protection Program funds — including around $8 million at its South Carolina facility — yet not calling 100 employees back to work following a shuttering of several weeks early in the pandemic.

At the time, Giti officials said the company had appropriately qualified for the assistance, and furloughed workers had been offered jobs by August 2020, although some declined.

In an op-ed this summer, Phang wrote that, like others, Giti was “blindsided” by the pandemic but “has no questions about its decision to start its operations in Chester County,” where the company’s commitment “is stronger than ever.”

On Tuesday, a Giti representative said the company welcomed “sincere and legitimate input” but added that, during the pandemic, Giti employees had shifted “to a more predictable work schedule,” and that they “can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.”

“You can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success,” David Shelton, Giti’s industry relations director, told the AP. “These are facts people need to know if deciding whether a union is best for them and their families.”

Asking that Giti affirm “the rights of workers to organize for their own safety and for job security without the fear of harassment, discrimination or job loss,” signatories to the letter — who include several members of the state Legislature who represent the area — requested a meeting with company officials.

Local Veteran, educator turns 100; honored by County Council, Columbia Mayor, and S.C. Governor

The Richburg family is honored to celebrate the 100th birthday of patriarch Stonewall McKinney Richburg on Saturday, August 14 at Spring Valley High School. Festivities begin with a birthday drive-by at 10 a.m. and conclude with a proclamation from Richland County Council, a presentation of the Centenarian Award from the Office of Governor Henry McMaster, and anticipated remarks from Steve Benjamin, Mayor of the City of Columbia.Stonewall McKinney Richburg was born in Tuskegee, Alabama on August 14, 1921. Richburg began serving his co...

The Richburg family is honored to celebrate the 100th birthday of patriarch Stonewall McKinney Richburg on Saturday, August 14 at Spring Valley High School. Festivities begin with a birthday drive-by at 10 a.m. and conclude with a proclamation from Richland County Council, a presentation of the Centenarian Award from the Office of Governor Henry McMaster, and anticipated remarks from Steve Benjamin, Mayor of the City of Columbia.

Stonewall McKinney Richburg was born in Tuskegee, Alabama on August 14, 1921. Richburg began serving his country upon induction into the United States Army in 1943. His first assignment was to the Columbia (SC) Army Air Base. In 1945, he completed the Army Engineer Officer Candidate School, where he was among the top ten of 91 graduates (and the only African-American) from a class of 334 candidates. He served in the Philippines during World War II from 1945-1946 and in the Korean conflict from 1951-1952. Richburg retired from the military in 1961 as Captain in the Army Reserve Corps of Engineers.

While serving in the Army, Richburg made Columbia his home and began his career as an educator in 1946. While attending church service with his future wife and her family, Richburg was introduced to Mr. C. A. Johnson, then Supervisor of Negro Schools. Shortly thereafter, Johnson offered Richburg a position at Booker T. Washington High School (“BTWHS”), a segregated school in Columbia, as its first teacher of mechanical drawing and blueprint reading. Richburg became principal of BTWHS in 1965. His seven years as principal included the beginning of desegregation and the start of the integration of Richland County schools. Public school desegregation in the state and the expansion of the University of South Carolina led to the closing of BTWHS in 1974. At that time, Richburg began working at the school district office.

Richburg retired from education in 1983, after 37 years of service in Columbia and Richland County School District One. Following his retirement, he continued to work for the district as a substitute for administrators and maintained his membership in the National Education Association, the South Carolina Education Association, the Richland County Education Association, and other professional education organizations including Phi Delta Kappa. In 2011, Richburg was one of six inductees into the district’s Hall of Fame, the highest honor bestowed upon individuals by the district’s Board of School Commissioners.

Richburg maintains membership in several organizations, to include the Booker T. Washington High School Foundation and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated. He is featured in the University of South Carolina Museum of Education’s “So Their Voices Will Never Be Forgotten” exhibition. Richburg visited the university to discuss the struggle for civil rights and the desegregation of schools in Columbia with students pursuing careers in education. Richburg is an alumnus of Columbia’s Alpha Iota Boulé of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity— the oldest African-American Greekletter fraternity.

Richburg, who is affectionately called “Stoney,” was blessed with 71 years of marriage to the late Geneva Smith, a Columbia native. Together, they share four children, eight grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren —many of whom will be participating in the birthday drive-by in Columbia to commemorate this milestone birthday and legacy.

Florida woman’s dog lost in South Carolina crash found weeks later

RICHBURG, S.C. (AP) — On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.Firefighters and other emergency workers responded to the crash that night. They lo...

RICHBURG, S.C. (AP) — On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.

There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.

Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.

Firefighters and other emergency workers responded to the crash that night. They looked for the chihuahua that had dashed into the woods

“He had darted into the woods and we just couldn’t find him,” said T. Melton, chief at Richburg Fire & Rescue. “It was dark.”

The owner of the dog, Jean Powers, was a woman in her 80s from Florida, Melton said. This was not just some dog. It was family.

Powers had adopted the dog years ago and the two had been inseparable.

Powers and family members including John Ladd of Union County, North Carolina, searched for days for the dog and kept in touch with Melton and others. Firefighters searched and volunteers searched. Chester County Animal Control assisted with a humane trap that was put near the site where the crash happened, Ladd said.

“It was heartbreaking,” Ladd said.

Powers herself stayed in Chester County for days and searched near the scene, said Ladd.

“She was out there looking at age 87,” Ladd said.

Ladd said Powers finally returned to Florida while others continued to look.

Richburg Fire & Rescue posted on its Facebook page — a page that is a central way of communicating in rural Chester County — about the missing dog. The word spread as the posts were shared.

Then on Aug. 2, more than two weeks after the dog was lost, Melton’s cellphone rang. In a small rural place, people have the fire chief’s number.

It was a lady who works at the BP station near the highway. She told how a Chester County couple had seen the social media postings and believed the missing dog had wandered to their house, Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control officers and firefighters rushed to the home of Amber Moore to see if the dog’s microchip matched the owner.

“Sure enough, it was the same dog,” Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control Director Kelli Simoneau said Jesse Rucker-Roof and Trish Zimmerman from her office confirmed the identity of Goofuss and arranged for the dog to be picked up Aug. 2 by Ladd.

Ladd’s wife drove Goofuss all the way to Florida the next day.

“So many people pulled together to help out,” Ladd said. “It is just wonderful.”

Powers said in a Facebook posting that her prayers had been answered with Goofuss being found and returned.

“I owe a great deal of thanks to all the people who have made this possible,” Powers wrote

In a phone interview from her Florida home, Powers said she and the searchers in Chester County — a rural county hundreds of miles from her home and located about half way between Charlotte and Columbia– never gave up, even though after two weeks hope was waning.

“The people there were just wonderful” Powers said.

Powers said Goofuss, age 6, back home in Florida spent the first day relaxing.

“I gave him treats and he’s relaxing” Powers said.

Simoneau of animal control in Chester said the combined efforts of all involved brought a lady from Florida in her 80s her dog after it was lost following a traffic collision. She urged all pet owners to have a microchip placed on a pet so that there is no confusion about if the dog is the right dog.

Goofuss sure was the right dog.

Animal control does the microchip service, Simoneau said.

Richburg is a small place, with less than 1,000 residents but with a busy . It sits in a rural county with around 32,000 residents between Rock Hill and Columbia.

But the people there care about each other and look out for each other. The job is help people. Work together. That’s what people in rural Chester County did yet again when there was a need, Melton said. The public, the firefighters, the animal control workers.

“There’s a word for it,” Melton said. “Community.”

ETSU Football Scrimmage Report #2

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (Aug. 20, 2022) – On the final day of preseason camp, the ETSU football team held its second scrimmage on a sunny Saturday afternoon inside Greene Stadium.OFFENSIVE HIGHLIGHTS ETSU’s run game accounted for 183 of the 298 yards on Saturday with sophomore Trey Foster (Knoxville, Tenn.) totaling 64 yards and one touchdown on the ground. Foster, who averaged 12.8 yards per carry, scored on a 49-yard burst up the middle.Preseason Southern Confe...

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (Aug. 20, 2022) – On the final day of preseason camp, the ETSU football team held its second scrimmage on a sunny Saturday afternoon inside Greene Stadium.

OFFENSIVE HIGHLIGHTS

ETSU’s run game accounted for 183 of the 298 yards on Saturday with sophomore Trey Foster (Knoxville, Tenn.) totaling 64 yards and one touchdown on the ground. Foster, who averaged 12.8 yards per carry, scored on a 49-yard burst up the middle.

Preseason Southern Conference Offensive Player of the Year Jacob Saylors (Jasper, Tenn.), who didn’t see action in last week’s scrimmage, rushed for 41 yards on five carries and scored on 21-yard scamper.

Jawan Martin (Decatur, Tenn.) led the backs with six carries and recorded 31 yards on the ground.

In total, the Buccaneer running backs averaged 5.2 yards per carry on Saturday.

Quarterbacks Tyler Riddell (Tampa, Fla.), Baron May (New Philadelphia, Ohio) and Brock Landis (Hoschton, Ga.) combined for 13 completions and 115 yards in the air with one touchdown. Riddell led the group with 63 yards passing, while Landis threw the lone touchdown – a 10-yard strike to Solomon Dunn (Johnson City, Tenn.) – marking Dunn’s second straight scrimmage with a score. May led the trio of quarterbacks with five completions.

Ten different Buccaneer receivers hauled in at least one catch with freshman Tommy Winton, III (Knoxville, Tenn.) leading the group with three receptions.

Red-shirt freshman Adriel Clark (Suwanee, Ga.) paced the Bucs with 42 receiving yards, including a 34-yard catch from Riddell.

DEFENSIVE HIGHLIGHTS

ETSU’s defense registered 47 tackles, two sacks, three tackles for loss, one interception and five pass breakups on Saturday.

Sophomore defensive back Sheldon Arnold, II (Loganville, Ga.) notched the lone defensive turnover of the two scrimmages as he intercepted Tyler Riddell in the end zone. To go with his pick, Arnold also totaled two solo tackles.

Red-shirt freshman linebacker Chandler Martin (Lithonia, Ga.) led the group with five tackles.

Red-shirt sophomore linebacker Zach West (Boone, N.C.) and red-shirt freshman defensive lineman Trey Richburg (Matthews, N.C.) posted the sacks on Saturday – both coming against Riddell. West finished with three solo hits and Richburg collected two tackles.

Sophomore linebacker Paxton Corkery (Jefferson, Ga.) added the final tackle for loss, while Mike Price (Stockbridge, Ga.), Alijah Huzzie (Franklin, Ga.), Jayvon Henderson (Auburn, Ga.), Jaden Walker (Summerville, S.C.) and Marquez Henry (Phenix City, Ala.) all made their presence felt in the secondary by registering at least one pass break up.

SPECIALISTS

Tyler Keltner (Tallahassee, Fla.), an all-SoCon kicker, drilled a 47-yard field goal on the Bucs’ first possession of the scrimmage. Keltner also connected on his one extra-point attempt following the Saylors score.

Trace Kelly (Gallatin, Tenn.) took the final two PAT tries and was successful on both.

SEASON OPENER

ETSU opens the 2022 season on Thursday, Sept. 1 against Mars Hill. To purchase season tickets, please call the ETSU ticket office at 423-439-3878 or visit ETSUTickets.com.

For more information on Buccaneer football, visit ETSUBucs.com and click on the football tab.

Florida woman’s dog lost in SC crash found weeks later

RICHBURG, S.C. (AP) — On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, becaus...

RICHBURG, S.C. (AP) — On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.

There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.

Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.

Firefighters and other emergency workers responded to the crash that night. They looked for the chihuahua that had dashed into the woods

“He had darted into the woods and we just couldn’t find him,” said T. Melton, chief at Richburg Fire & Rescue. “It was dark.”

The owner of the dog, Jean Powers, was a woman in her 80s from Florida, Melton said. This was not just some dog. It was family.

Powers had adopted the dog years ago and the two had been inseparable.

Powers and family members including John Ladd of Union County, North Carolina, searched for days for the dog and kept in touch with Melton and others. Firefighters searched and volunteers searched. Chester County Animal Control assisted with a humane trap that was put near the site where the crash happened, Ladd said.

“It was heartbreaking,” Ladd said.

Powers herself stayed in Chester County for days and searched near the scene, said Ladd.

“She was out there looking at age 87,” Ladd said.

Ladd said Powers finally returned to Florida while others continued to look.

Richburg Fire & Rescue posted on its Facebook page — a page that is a central way of communicating in rural Chester County — about the missing dog. The word spread as the posts were shared.

Then on Aug. 2, more than two weeks after the dog was lost, Melton’s cellphone rang. In a small rural place, people have the fire chief’s number.

It was a lady who works at the BP station near the highway. She told how a Chester County couple had seen the social media postings and believed the missing dog had wandered to their house, Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control officers and firefighters rushed to the home of Amber Moore to see if the dog’s microchip matched the owner.

“Sure enough, it was the same dog,” Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control Director Kelli Simoneau said Jesse Rucker-Roof and Trish Zimmerman from her office confirmed the identity of Goofuss and arranged for the dog to be picked up Aug. 2 by Ladd.

Ladd’s wife drove Goofuss all the way to Florida the next day.

“So many people pulled together to help out,” Ladd said. “It is just wonderful.”

Powers said in a Facebook posting that her prayers had been answered with Goofuss being found and returned.

“I owe a great deal of thanks to all the people who have made this possible,” Powers wrote

In a phone interview from her Florida home, Powers said she and the searchers in Chester County — a rural county hundreds of miles from her home and located about half way between Charlotte and Columbia– never gave up, even though after two weeks hope was waning.

“The people there were just wonderful” Powers said.

Powers said Goofuss, age 6, back home in Florida spent the first day relaxing.

“I gave him treats and he’s relaxing” Powers said.

Simoneau of animal control in Chester said the combined efforts of all involved brought a lady from Florida in her 80s her dog after it was lost following a traffic collision. She urged all pet owners to have a microchip placed on a pet so that there is no confusion about if the dog is the right dog.

Goofuss sure was the right dog.

Animal control does the microchip service, Simoneau said.

Richburg is a small place, with less than 1,000 residents but with a busy . It sits in a rural county with around 32,000 residents between Rock Hill and Columbia.

But the people there care about each other and look out for each other.

The job is help people. Work together. That’s what people in rural Chester County did yet again when there was a need, Melton said.

The public, the firefighters, the animal control workers.

“There’s a word for it,” Melton said. “Community.”

S.C. State alumni members celebrate 109th, 105th, 100th birthdays in September

ORANGEBURG, S.C. (WCIV) — Three graduates of South Carolina State University celebrated birthdays of at least 100 years during the month of September.***The following biographical information is provided by SC State University.Ms. Ethel Margaret Richburg turned 109 on Sept. 5.She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from SC State, leading to a 40-year career as an elementary school teacher in Clarendon and Berkeley counties. In 1994, she was inducted into the...

ORANGEBURG, S.C. (WCIV) — Three graduates of South Carolina State University celebrated birthdays of at least 100 years during the month of September.

***The following biographical information is provided by SC State University.

Ms. Ethel Margaret Richburg turned 109 on Sept. 5.

She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from SC State, leading to a 40-year career as an elementary school teacher in Clarendon and Berkeley counties. In 1994, she was inducted into the Clarendon County Education Hall of Fame.

Richburg also worked the polls for every election for two decades.

She now lives in Nashville, Tennessee, with her 86-year-old daughter.

Mrs. Mae Cora Peterson, Class of 1937, turned 105 years old on Tuesday, Sept. 14.

She was born in Columbia, but her family moved to Orangeburg shortly after her birth. Her father, Elliott Lee Stewart, cut timber for buildings at The Colored Normal, Industrial, Agricultural, and Mechanical College of South Carolina -- now known as South Carolina State University. He also taught brick masonry at the school.

It was at SC State that she became a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority in its first pledge class of 1934. She later attended graduate school at the University of Michigan.

She relocated to Fort Worth, Texas, on her own to start her career as executive secretary for the segregated branch of the Fort Worth WYCA in 1943. She married in 1947 and had three children.

Mrs. Peterson was an educator at various schools and became dean of girls at the Fort Worth’s Dunbar High School, where she worked 27 years before retiring in 1980. She has stayed active with community organizations, including Senior Services of Greater Tarrant County, and has been an avid supporter of the Fort Worth Symphony.

She now resides in a senior living facility in Mansfield, Texas, and remains active in the Dallas-Fort Worth Chapter of the SC State National Alumni Association. She served as the speaker at the chapter’s first scholarship banquet in 2016. She was featured as a Stellar Alumnae in the month of April in the SCSU 2017 calendar.

Ms. Johnnie Mae Lee, Class of 1943, celebrated her 100th birthday on Sept. 10.

She is a native of Anderson, South Carolina and the first of 11 children of the late Cyrus S. and Mabel Coaxum Lee.

At an early age she attended Bethel A.M.E. Church in Anderson and was involved in many of the church and community activities. She received her earliest education at South Fant Street School and later attended Reed Street High School graduating with honors as the salutatorian of her class.

Ms. Lee received a scholarship and attended South Carolina A & M (now SC State University), earning a bachelor’s degree in education in 1943. She returned to Anderson as a teacher at Reed Street School for a year.

Later, relocating to New York City, she pursued graduate studies at Teacher’s College at Columbia University and Brooklyn College. She accepted a position with the city’s Department of Health. Later, with a promotion, she transferred to the Department of Finance as a principal Administrative Associate. Ms. Lee retired after 37 years of service with NYC Government.

Ms. Lee has traveled extensively and has a beautiful and loving relationship with her family of six siblings and many nieces, nephews and friends.

She has resided in Cambria Heights, New York, for 43 years.

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