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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Richburg, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Richburg:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Richburg, SC

2 more! Fort Mill, Catawba Ridge, Lewisville softball win to head to state championships

As Fort Mill softball coach Chuck Stegall met with media following his team’s Upper State championship game against Dorman, two of his players lurked just behind him with a water cooler. Just as he went to answer one of the questions, a wall of water washed over him.Stegall didn’t seem to mind all that much. To be honest, it was probably the only thing for which he and his team weren’t prepared all night.The Yellow Jackets collected eight hits from the top four spots in their lineup — including four in a...

As Fort Mill softball coach Chuck Stegall met with media following his team’s Upper State championship game against Dorman, two of his players lurked just behind him with a water cooler. Just as he went to answer one of the questions, a wall of water washed over him.

Stegall didn’t seem to mind all that much. To be honest, it was probably the only thing for which he and his team weren’t prepared all night.

The Yellow Jackets collected eight hits from the top four spots in their lineup — including four in a row in a five-run sixth inning — to turn away Dorman, 10-5, and earn a trip to the 5A state softball title series.

Fort Mill is now two wins away from the program’s first state championship. The enormity of it all left Stegall at a loss for words.

“It’s just too much feeling. It’s been 30 years of being out here on the field,” Stegall said. “This group here, we had a lot of them in a camp six or seven years ago. I had thought about getting out at the 25-year mark.

“Watching the light bulb go off in their head and convincing them that they could hit it over the fence, convincing them they could make that double play, convincing them that they could do this … This team is doing it, but all the kids that came before these girls set the standard of what we were gonna do, what we were gonna work for and how we were gonna line up.”

Dorman (23-7) broke the seal just two batters into the contest. Cavalier center fielder Lydia Johnson did the honors, driving a deep fly ball over the wall in left-center and putting the visitors ahead, 1-0.

The advantage was short-lived, though. Brynn Bertolini led off the game with a base hit, while Maddie Drerup was intentionally passed after Bertolini was sacrificed to second. Both runners came around to score on a ball off Trista Reid’s bat that found the outfield grass. The Jackets would go on to leave the bases loaded but hold a 2-1 lead after an inning.

The Cavaliers drew level in their half of the third. Gracie Freeman led off the inning with a sharp single, then ventured home on a Blair Darby grounder to second. Dorman advanced another runner to second, but Drerup stranded the runner to end the frame with no further damage.

The thunder again roared from the top of the Jackets’ order in the bottom of the fourth. Ava Balsinger started the inning with a sharp double to right, which Drerup followed with a double of her own to plate Balsinger. Reid then pummeled a deep fly ball to center, which was enough to plate Drerup and put Fort Mill ahead, 4-2.

“That’s a magical space right there,” Stegall said of the top of the Fort Mill batting order. “When you put those kids back-to-back-to-back, you’ve gotta pick your poison.”

Fort Mill (17-5) added a single run in the fifth, with Balsinger again rapping a solid single to plate a Jacket baserunner. That minor spark turned out to be a preview for the huge fireworks show that would erupt in the sixth.

Vicki Lott started the inning with a line-drive double to right-center. Following the first out of the inning, each of the top four of Bertolini, Balsinger, Drerup and Reid reached base via a base hit. Drerup sandwiched a double among three singles from the foursome. Dorman pitcher Kasey Wolfe righted the ship and retired the Yellow Jackets, but not before the home side batted around and seized a 10-2 advantage heading to the top of the seventh.

The celebration would prove neither quick nor easy. Dorman worked three straight batters on base — scoring each — before recording the second out of the inning. Two more Cavaliers waited on the pillows to further slice into the margin, but Drerup induced a grounder to Emma Tisdale. Tisdale then fielded just in front of the bag, tossed across to Balsinger, and Fort Mill clinched its first trip to the title series.

“We just talked to them and said to get one out at a time and not try to make the hero play. Let’s just do what we do and get an out. If we gave up a run, we were fine,” Stegall said. “It let us relax. If they scored two runs, three runs or four runs — we were concerned about the outs. We were concerned about getting one out at a time.”

Fort Mill welcomes Lexington to The Hive Monday night for game one of the SC 5A state championship series. First pitch is slated for 7 p.m.

The Catawba Ridge Copperheads defeated the York Cougars 7-2 to win the 4A Upper State Championship Friday night in Fort Mill — and in doing so, they earned their first berth to a state championship series in the school’s three-year history.

The Copperheads made the most of six hits in recording the win as they improved to 26-4 on the year. They will play the North Augusta Yellow Jackets in a best-of-three series next week for the state title.

Catawba Ridge rallied for five runs in the third to take a 5-0 lead. Kendra Murray, Janelle Ilacqua, and Braylon Lawrence were all credited with an RBI in the outburst. Sarah Rocheleau’s two-run double was the big hit in the frame.

The Copperheads added two more in the fourth inning. A pair of errors by York and Lawrence’s run-scoring single produced the runs.

York, which lost in the opening round and battled back to reach the championship round, cut the deficit to 7-2 with a pair of runs in the fifth. Avery Smith reached on an error, and Peyton Brooks followed with a single. Both rode home on a double by Marisa Reyes.

Chloe Burger pitched a complete game and recorded the win. She scattered five hits, struck out 11, and walked none.

Layla Clayton took the loss for York, which completed the year with a mark of 15-7. She also pitched a complete game. She allowed only six hits and struck out 10.

The Lewisville Lions edged the McBee Panthers 10-9 in eight innings to claim the 1A Upper State title Friday night in Richburg.

Lewisville will be searching for its second all-time state championship. The school’s only title arrived in 2018.

McBee got off to a quick start, taking a 5-0 lead in the top of the first. The Lions played catch up the rest of the contest.

“We showed our resilience tonight,” said Lewisville head coach Jerry Thomas. “This was a big team win.”

They rallied for four in the third to cut the deficit to 5-4. The Panthers took a 6-4 lead in the top of the fifth, but Lewisville answered with a score in the bottom of the frame to make it 6-5.

McBee added one more in the sixth for a 7-5 advantage. The Lions retaliated in a hurry. A bases-clearing triple by Saleena Rollings in the bottom of the frame gave Lewisville its first lead at 8-7.

“That was a huge hit for us,” added Thomas. “It gave us the lead and some confidence heading down the stretch.”

The Panthers wasted no time. They countered with two in the seventh, but Lewisville tied it with a run in the bottom of the frame to send it to extra innings.

The Lions rallied in the eighth for a run to earn the hard-fought victory. Abby Furr walked to open the inning. She stole second, and when she stole third, the McBee catcher threw the ball into left field to allow the winning run to score.

“Abby is an excellent base runner,” he added. “We knew if we could her on base, she could put some pressure on them.”

Alyssa Rollings and Jordyn Miller led the Lions with two hits each. Savannah Rollins added a hit and drove in a run.

Sarah Owens, who is an eighth grader, worked a complete game and got the win. She allowed 10 hits, struck out four, and walked three.

“We talked to her after the first inning and settled her down,” added Thomas. “She did a wonderful job after that.”

The win, which was the third of the year over McBee, improved the Lions to 23-8. They will take on the Bamberg-Ehrhardt Red Raiders in a best-of-three series next week for the state championship. The opening game in the series is set for Monday in Bamberg.

Friday (First Round)

5A

Fort Mill 2, Dorman 1

Byrnes 12, Clover 3

4A

Catawba Ridge 7, Greenwood 2

Easley 3, York 1

1A

Lewisville 11, Ridge Spring-Monetta 0

Monday (Second Round)

5A

Fort Mill 8, Byrnes 7

Dorman 6, Clover 5

4A

Catawba Ridge 5, Easley 1

York 4, Greeenwood 0

1A

Lewisville 2, Dixie 0

Wednesday (Elimination Round)

4A

York 5, Easley 3

Friday (Championship Round)

5A

Fort Mill 10, Dorman 5

4A

Catawba Ridge 7, York 2

1A

Lewisville 10, McBee 9 (8)

This story was originally published May 20, 2022 10:39 PM.

2 more! Fort Mill, Catawba Ridge, Lewisville softball win to head to state championships

As Fort Mill softball coach Chuck Stegall met with media following his team’s Upper State championship game against Dorman, two of his players lurked just behind him with a water cooler. Just as he went to answer one of the questions, a wall of water washed over him.Stegall didn’t seem to mind all that much. To be honest, it was probably the only thing for which he and his team weren’t prepared all night.The Yellow Jackets collected eight hits from the top four spots in their lineup — including four in a...

As Fort Mill softball coach Chuck Stegall met with media following his team’s Upper State championship game against Dorman, two of his players lurked just behind him with a water cooler. Just as he went to answer one of the questions, a wall of water washed over him.

Stegall didn’t seem to mind all that much. To be honest, it was probably the only thing for which he and his team weren’t prepared all night.

The Yellow Jackets collected eight hits from the top four spots in their lineup — including four in a row in a five-run sixth inning — to turn away Dorman, 10-5, and earn a trip to the 5A state softball title series.

Fort Mill is now two wins away from the program’s first state championship. The enormity of it all left Stegall at a loss for words.

“It’s just too much feeling. It’s been 30 years of being out here on the field,” Stegall said. “This group here, we had a lot of them in a camp six or seven years ago. I had thought about getting out at the 25-year mark.

“Watching the light bulb go off in their head and convincing them that they could hit it over the fence, convincing them they could make that double play, convincing them that they could do this … This team is doing it, but all the kids that came before these girls set the standard of what we were gonna do, what we were gonna work for and how we were gonna line up.”

Dorman (23-7) broke the seal just two batters into the contest. Cavalier center fielder Lydia Johnson did the honors, driving a deep fly ball over the wall in left-center and putting the visitors ahead, 1-0.

The advantage was short-lived, though. Brynn Bertolini led off the game with a base hit, while Maddie Drerup was intentionally passed after Bertolini was sacrificed to second. Both runners came around to score on a ball off Trista Reid’s bat that found the outfield grass. The Jackets would go on to leave the bases loaded but hold a 2-1 lead after an inning.

The Cavaliers drew level in their half of the third. Gracie Freeman led off the inning with a sharp single, then ventured home on a Blair Darby grounder to second. Dorman advanced another runner to second, but Drerup stranded the runner to end the frame with no further damage.

The thunder again roared from the top of the Jackets’ order in the bottom of the fourth. Ava Balsinger started the inning with a sharp double to right, which Drerup followed with a double of her own to plate Balsinger. Reid then pummeled a deep fly ball to center, which was enough to plate Drerup and put Fort Mill ahead, 4-2.

“That’s a magical space right there,” Stegall said of the top of the Fort Mill batting order. “When you put those kids back-to-back-to-back, you’ve gotta pick your poison.”

Fort Mill (17-5) added a single run in the fifth, with Balsinger again rapping a solid single to plate a Jacket baserunner. That minor spark turned out to be a preview for the huge fireworks show that would erupt in the sixth.

Vicki Lott started the inning with a line-drive double to right-center. Following the first out of the inning, each of the top four of Bertolini, Balsinger, Drerup and Reid reached base via a base hit. Drerup sandwiched a double among three singles from the foursome. Dorman pitcher Kasey Wolfe righted the ship and retired the Yellow Jackets, but not before the home side batted around and seized a 10-2 advantage heading to the top of the seventh.

The celebration would prove neither quick nor easy. Dorman worked three straight batters on base — scoring each — before recording the second out of the inning. Two more Cavaliers waited on the pillows to further slice into the margin, but Drerup induced a grounder to Emma Tisdale. Tisdale then fielded just in front of the bag, tossed across to Balsinger, and Fort Mill clinched its first trip to the title series.

“We just talked to them and said to get one out at a time and not try to make the hero play. Let’s just do what we do and get an out. If we gave up a run, we were fine,” Stegall said. “It let us relax. If they scored two runs, three runs or four runs — we were concerned about the outs. We were concerned about getting one out at a time.”

Fort Mill welcomes Lexington to The Hive Monday night for game one of the SC 5A state championship series. First pitch is slated for 7 p.m.

The Catawba Ridge Copperheads defeated the York Cougars 7-2 to win the 4A Upper State Championship Friday night in Fort Mill — and in doing so, they earned their first berth to a state championship series in the school’s three-year history.

The Copperheads made the most of six hits in recording the win as they improved to 26-4 on the year. They will play the North Augusta Yellow Jackets in a best-of-three series next week for the state title.

Catawba Ridge rallied for five runs in the third to take a 5-0 lead. Kendra Murray, Janelle Ilacqua, and Braylon Lawrence were all credited with an RBI in the outburst. Sarah Rocheleau’s two-run double was the big hit in the frame.

The Copperheads added two more in the fourth inning. A pair of errors by York and Lawrence’s run-scoring single produced the runs.

York, which lost in the opening round and battled back to reach the championship round, cut the deficit to 7-2 with a pair of runs in the fifth. Avery Smith reached on an error, and Peyton Brooks followed with a single. Both rode home on a double by Marisa Reyes.

Chloe Burger pitched a complete game and recorded the win. She scattered five hits, struck out 11, and walked none.

Layla Clayton took the loss for York, which completed the year with a mark of 15-7. She also pitched a complete game. She allowed only six hits and struck out 10.

The Lewisville Lions edged the McBee Panthers 10-9 in eight innings to claim the 1A Upper State title Friday night in Richburg.

Lewisville will be searching for its second all-time state championship. The school’s only title arrived in 2018.

McBee got off to a quick start, taking a 5-0 lead in the top of the first. The Lions played catch up the rest of the contest.

“We showed our resilience tonight,” said Lewisville head coach Jerry Thomas. “This was a big team win.”

They rallied for four in the third to cut the deficit to 5-4. The Panthers took a 6-4 lead in the top of the fifth, but Lewisville answered with a score in the bottom of the frame to make it 6-5.

McBee added one more in the sixth for a 7-5 advantage. The Lions retaliated in a hurry. A bases-clearing triple by Saleena Rollings in the bottom of the frame gave Lewisville its first lead at 8-7.

“That was a huge hit for us,” added Thomas. “It gave us the lead and some confidence heading down the stretch.”

The Panthers wasted no time. They countered with two in the seventh, but Lewisville tied it with a run in the bottom of the frame to send it to extra innings.

The Lions rallied in the eighth for a run to earn the hard-fought victory. Abby Furr walked to open the inning. She stole second, and when she stole third, the McBee catcher threw the ball into left field to allow the winning run to score.

“Abby is an excellent base runner,” he added. “We knew if we could her on base, she could put some pressure on them.”

Alyssa Rollings and Jordyn Miller led the Lions with two hits each. Savannah Rollins added a hit and drove in a run.

Sarah Owens, who is an eighth grader, worked a complete game and got the win. She allowed 10 hits, struck out four, and walked three.

“We talked to her after the first inning and settled her down,” added Thomas. “She did a wonderful job after that.”

The win, which was the third of the year over McBee, improved the Lions to 23-8. They will take on the Bamberg-Ehrhardt Red Raiders in a best-of-three series next week for the state championship. The opening game in the series is set for Monday in Bamberg.

Friday (First Round)

5A

Fort Mill 2, Dorman 1

Byrnes 12, Clover 3

4A

Catawba Ridge 7, Greenwood 2

Easley 3, York 1

1A

Lewisville 11, Ridge Spring-Monetta 0

Monday (Second Round)

5A

Fort Mill 8, Byrnes 7

Dorman 6, Clover 5

4A

Catawba Ridge 5, Easley 1

York 4, Greeenwood 0

1A

Lewisville 2, Dixie 0

Wednesday (Elimination Round)

4A

York 5, Easley 3

Friday (Championship Round)

5A

Fort Mill 10, Dorman 5

4A

Catawba Ridge 7, York 2

1A

Lewisville 10, McBee 9 (8)

This story was originally published May 20, 2022 10:39 PM.

MacKenzie Investment Group plans industrial project along Interstate 77 corridor in Chester County

As the Charlotte industrial sector remains red hot, another group is moving into a submarket farther out in the region for a project.Maryland-based MacKenzie Investment Group secured final rezoning approval for a nearly 110-acre site in Chester County last month. Gavin Gill, director of investments for MacKenzie, told the Charlotte Business Journal that the group is plotting a large industr...

As the Charlotte industrial sector remains red hot, another group is moving into a submarket farther out in the region for a project.

Maryland-based MacKenzie Investment Group secured final rezoning approval for a nearly 110-acre site in Chester County last month. Gavin Gill, director of investments for MacKenzie, told the Charlotte Business Journal that the group is plotting a large industrial project there. The site is at S.C. Highway 9 and Interstate 77, just off Exit 65. It neighbors Giti Tire's large Richburg manufacturing plant.

A specific site plan for the project has not yet been finalized, Gill said, but the property can fit around 1.2 million square feet of industrial building space. The largest building at the site will likely land somewhere in the 700,000- to 800,000-square-foot range. Gill and his team are considering both speculative and build-to-suit development at the site.

MacKenzie does not have any active projects currently in the Charlotte region, Gill said, but it is one of the group's target areas because of the region's population growth. The Chester County site's close proximity to I-77 made it attractive to MacKenzie, as it could be an appealing location for distribution and light manufacturing users that need to access ports.

"We think that is where the market is moving in greater Charlotte," Gill said.

Charlotte-based Oak Engineering is working with MacKenzie on the project. Cushman & Wakefield's Matt Treble and Fermin Deoca are leading leasing efforts on behalf of MacKenzie. A firm timeline for the project's construction has not yet been set, Gill said.

Chester County has been referred to by some market observers as an industrial submarket that could heat up as developers look farther out into the region for industrial sites. Its proximity to I-77 makes sense for distribution uses as momentum moves south along the interstate. Much of that momentum has been carrying north along I-77 already, as the Statesville area is seeing a flurry of speculative industrial interest.

Elsewhere in Chester County, a large industrial site is beginning to be unlocked for industrial development. The first building at Magnolia Industrial Park, a 724-acre site in Richburg, was announced in March as a 105,000-square-foot speculative building.

Charlotte region is all clear from severe weather

A line of storms brought the threat of heavy rain, damaging winds, hail, lightning and isolated tornadoes to the Charlotte region Friday.CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A line of severe thunderstorms moved through Charlotte and the Interstate 77 corridor of North Carolina and South Carolina Friday, moving out of the region shortly after 9 p.m.The National Weather Service warned the storms could produce damaging winds up to 60 mph, and hail upwards of 1.75 inches in addition to a possible tornado.Friday was a ...

A line of storms brought the threat of heavy rain, damaging winds, hail, lightning and isolated tornadoes to the Charlotte region Friday.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A line of severe thunderstorms moved through Charlotte and the Interstate 77 corridor of North Carolina and South Carolina Friday, moving out of the region shortly after 9 p.m.

The National Weather Service warned the storms could produce damaging winds up to 60 mph, and hail upwards of 1.75 inches in addition to a possible tornado.

Friday was a Weather Aware Day for the Charlotte region as storms brought the threat of damaging winds, hail and isolated tornadoes to the Carolinas.

A Tornado Watch was in effect for most of the Charlotte area until 8 p.m. Friday. This watch included, but was not limited to: Alexander, Anson, Ashe, Avery, Burke, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Catawba, Cleveland, Gaston, Iredell, Lancaster Lincoln, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Richmond, Rowan, Union and Watauga counties.

Nearly 500 flights out of Charlotte Douglas International Airport were delayed during the severe weather and more than 85 were canceled, according to FlightAware.

Chief Meteorologist Brad Panovich said the risk for severe thunderstorms in Charlotte and surrounding areas increased because of afternoon sunshine, which allowed the atmosphere to heat.

According to NWS, roughly 1.75 inches was reported in the Crouse area around 4:55 p.m., and about 1.75 inches was reported in the Kings Mountain area around 4:50 p.m.

About 1 inch of hail was reported in the Lincolnton area around 4:55 p.m., roughly 1 inch was reported near Crowders around 4:56 p.m., and less than an inch was reported in Shelby around 4:50 p.m.

PHOTOS: May 6 severe weather impacts

About 4,000 people were without power as severe thunderstorms pushed through the at times Carolinas Friday afternoon.

According to Duke Energy, about 2,845 customers in the greater Waxhaw area were reported to be without power around 2:30 p.m. Fewer than 100 customers were without power as of 11 p.m.

Roughly 1,029 were reported to be without power near Richburg, SC just before 2 p.m., according to Duke Energy. As of 11 p.m., roughly 1,000 customers were still without power.

Outages were also reported near Mt. Gilead, NC around 3:45 p.m. As of 11 p.m., roughly 1,000 customers in the Norwood area were still without power.

The biggest threats from Friday's storms were damaging winds, heavy rain, large hail, lightning and isolated tornadoes, with a flood risk for some areas depending on local rain totals.

What to do during a tornado warning

When there is an active tornado warning, you need to know where you should go. No matter where you are, whether it's at home, an apartment, in the car or out and about, you should always have a plan for severe weather.

When at home, you and your family need to go to a safe place. First, go to the lowest level of your home immediately. A basement is ideal, but if you don't have one, find the most interior room of your house away from windows.

Crouch on the floor and cover your head as much as you can. Brad Panovich's family keeps helmets in their safe space, along with other supplies for a tornado warning.

Your safe place should have a flashlight, as well as food and water. You should always wear shoes because if there is damage, you may have to walk through nails or broken glass.

In an apartment building, the same rules apply. You need to head to the lowest level, but use the stairs because the elevator could lose power. A place like under the staircase, an interior hallway or a room with no windows is your safe place. Crouch and cover your head.

This is the riskiest place to be during a tornado. If the tornado is far enough away you can drive away from it at 90-degree angles until you find a safe place. If it is nearby, DO NOT try to outrun it. Instead, pull over. If a sturdy structure is not available, then stay in your car with your seatbelt on. Duck below the dash and cover your head.

An EF1 tornado can push a car and an EF2 can lift it off the road. DO NOT seek shelter under a bridge or overpass. Flying debris tends to move even faster, making it more dangerous.

Most importantly, don't panic. Be mindful of others and move as quickly and safely as possible to an interior bathroom or storage room. Any enclosed place away from windows is your target. Some establishments will have a marked tornado shelter.

What is a severe thunderstorm by definition?

A thunderstorm is only considered severe when it has at least one of these:

When a thunderstorm has either of these criteria, the National Weather Service will issue a Severe Thunderstorm Warning for individual storms.

If storms in the near future are expected to have these criteria, the National Weather Service will issue a Severe Thunderstorm Watch across an entire region. Severe Thunderstorm Warnings could then be issued for individual storms as needed.

What is a tornado warning?

The National Weather Service will issue tornado warnings on individual storms that are likely, or are already producing, a tornado warning.

Similar to thunderstorms, the National Weather Service may issue a Tornado Watch ahead of storms. A watch could expand across an entire region in advance of storms.

Wake Up Charlotte To Go is a daily news and weather podcast you can listen to so you can start your day with the team at Wake Up Charlotte. SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts || Spotify || Stitcher || TuneIn || Google Podcasts

All of WCNC Charlotte's podcasts are free and available for both streaming and download. You can listen now on Android, iPhone, Amazon, and other internet-connected devices. Join us from North Carolina, South Carolina, or on the go anywhere.

Local, state leaders, concerned citizens still waiting for reply from Giti CEO

WBTV is told more than 40 people marched to the front gates of Giti Tire to deliver a letter demanding better working conditions.CHESTER, S.C. (WBTV) - Chester County and state leaders are demanding better working conditions for employees at a tire manufacturing plant in Richburg.The leaders want to meet with the CEO of Giti Tire to discuss workers “being treated without dignity.” They are giving Giti until December 3 to respond.The letter was signed by more than 45 local and state leaders, religious figures ...

WBTV is told more than 40 people marched to the front gates of Giti Tire to deliver a letter demanding better working conditions.

CHESTER, S.C. (WBTV) - Chester County and state leaders are demanding better working conditions for employees at a tire manufacturing plant in Richburg.

The leaders want to meet with the CEO of Giti Tire to discuss workers “being treated without dignity.” They are giving Giti until December 3 to respond.

The letter was signed by more than 45 local and state leaders, religious figures and union representatives demanding a sit-down meeting with Giti’s CEO, but the representative that handed it over does not know if it was delivered. According to him, an officer, who came to clear the group from the front gates, told the group he would deliver the letter to a manager himself.

”I was really disturbed,” says Councilwoman Tabatha Strothers.

Last week, she and about 40 people stood at the front entrance with a handwritten letter for the company’s CEO. The group has been hearing directly from employees who say the working conditions have not been good.

”This is an outrage. Our whole community should be outraged,” she says.

The group, who came here a week ago, included concerned citizens, religious leaders, and several state representatives. They say anonymous reports from workers detail mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, and low wages.

Singapore-owned Giti Tire opened its South Carolina facility in 2017 and employs almost 750 people. When the company signed on to come to Chester County, it promised 1,700 jobs within 10 years. Strothers says the company broke promises, which she feels is unacceptable.

“As elected officials, we need to require more of them and see to it that they live up to what they have promised,” says Strothers.

For her, this also means living up to the promises made by Giti when the company arrived in Chester County in 2017. Despite promises of a $20 wage and 1,700 hired workers, employees say the pay is about $12 for some and less than 750 people are working at the plant according to Chester County Economic Development. In a statement sent to WBTV, Giti says they have 600 workers at the plant. The company is hiring.

”You can’t mistreat people as if it’s ok because it’s not,” says Strothers.

The letter asks Giti to re-establish a commitment to livable wages and the ability to unionize. So far, no response from the company.

”It shows a refusal to answer our calls. And so this is a lesson learned,” says Representative John King, a York representative who was also signed and delivered the letter to Giti.

He says the lesson learned does not mean they give up this current fight for the Giti workers. However, he feels like moving forward, other companies should have some kind of contractually built-in repercussions if workers step forward with major grievances. He says that should be included when discussing tax breaks for new companies that come to the area.

”Just because someone doesn’t respond doesn’t mean we wash our hands of it. No, we’re gonna fight like hell for those people because they have fought for us to represent them and be their voices,” says King.

Giti Tire did respond to our request for comment. The company’s Director of Industry Relations, David Shelton, says “As a member of the Chester County community, Giti Tire always welcomes sincere and legitimate input from our team members and other community members. As a core principle, Giti Tire works very hard to ensure we have all the facts and accurate information before taking action.” The statement did not mention receiving the letter or responding by the deadline.

WBTV asked Strothers what the next steps are if Giti does not comply with their demand to meet by Friday. She says they are working on a plan but did not want to expand on specifics. She did say that they will have more resources and more people to continue the fight.

The full statement from Giti here:

Giti Tire is proud to call South Carolina home to our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility where dedicated team members produce high-quality, American-made tires. We’ve been able to provide an exceptional array of jobs in Chester County for operators, technicians, polymer experts, engineers in chemical, mechanical, civil, computer science, and electrical fields, administrative, finance and accounting, and many others all while providing strong benefits and competitive salaries.

As a member of the Chester County community, Giti Tire always welcomes sincere and legitimate input from our team members and other community members. As a core principle, Giti Tire works very hard to ensure we have all the facts and accurate information before taking action. We certainly hope others will also be diligent in confirming the facts and evaluating items coming from parties outside of our Chester County operations who are providing false and misleading information. We recognize this is part of an organized, union-led effort. People who have been a part of our community, and surrounding communities, know that you can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success. These are facts people need to know before even thinking a union is best for them and their families.

At Giti Tire, we have always recognized that our team members are the strength of our operations and the key to our future success. This was exceptionally clear as the United States reopened from the COVID-19 shutdown. Like many companies, we experienced an increase in demand for our products, requiring a dramatic production response. Our Giti Tire team joined together and sacrificed time and energy to restart operations and serve our customers. Once operations fully restarted and demand normalized, our production and schedules also returned to a more balanced work life experience and we were able to provide a salary increase for many.

Over the last 20 months, Giti Tire has also increased employee communications and engagement as we have worked to navigate the pandemic. Our 600 employees are our number one priority and most valuable asset. We believe they can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.

Therefore, we always welcome the opportunity to hear from employees and provide open lines of communications. We also want to ensure citizens in South Carolina know the facts and we look forward to sharing our story. Chester County is an excellent home for Giti Tire. We are continuing to invest in our South Carolina operations as we plan to be here for many years to come.

Copyright 2021 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Giti Tire responds to local leaders’ complaints of unfair treatment at SC plant

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.“Giti Tire is proud to call South C...

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.

David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.

The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.

Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.

“Giti Tire is proud to call South Carolina home to our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility where dedicated team members produce high-quality, American-made tires. We’ve been able to provide an exceptional array of jobs in Chester County for operators, technicians, polymer experts, engineers in chemical, mechanical, civil, computer science, and electrical fields, administrative, finance and accounting, and many others all while providing strong benefits and competitive salaries.

“As a member of the Chester County community, Giti Tire always welcomes sincere and legitimate input from our team members and other community members. As a core principle, Giti Tire works very hard to ensure we have all the facts and accurate information before taking action. We certainly hope others will also be diligent in confirming the facts and evaluating items coming from parties outside of our Chester County operations who are providing false and misleading information. We recognize this is part of an organized, union-led effort. People who have been a part of our community, and surrounding communities, know that you can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success. These are facts people need to know before even thinking a union is best for them and their families.

“At Giti Tire, we have always recognized that our team members are the strength of our operations and the key to our future success. This was exceptionally clear as the United States reopened from the COVID-19 shutdown. Like many companies, we experienced an increase in demand for our products, requiring a dramatic production response. Our Giti Tire team joined together and sacrificed time and energy to restart operations and serve our customers. Once operations fully restarted and demand normalized, our production and schedules also returned to a more balanced work life experience and we were able to provide a salary increase for many.

“Over the last 20 months, Giti Tire has also increased employee communications and engagement as we have worked to navigate the pandemic. Our 600 employees are our number one priority and most valuable asset. We believe they can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.

“Therefore, we always welcome the opportunity to hear from employees and provide open lines of communications. We also want to ensure citizens in South Carolina know the facts and we look forward to sharing our story. Chester County is an excellent home for Giti Tire. We are continuing to invest in our South Carolina operations as we plan to be here for many years to come.”

A group of concerned citizens walked to the gates of the Giti plant on Nov. 23.

They attempted to hand-deliver a letter signed by a coalition of 27 local leaders, including two S.C. State Representatives, county officials from York and Chester counties, Chester City council members and Chester Mayor Wanda Stringfellow.

They also were joined by representatives of the United Steelworkers Union, which released a statement last March denouncing Giti.

The group was not allowed to leave the letter at the security gate at the entrance to the facility.

A law enforcement officer on the scene took a copy of the letter and promised to contact S.C. State Rep. John King when it had been delivered. As of Tuesday afternoon, King said, to his knowledge, the letter hand not yet reached Giti officials.

The letter, obtained by The Herald, asks for a meeting to discuss unfair working conditions at the plant.

“Workers have reported mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, low wages, and the inability to have time off with their families without retaliation. When workers have raised concerns your company has begun intimidating and even threatening to close the plant if they decide to exercise their right to protected, concerted activity,” the letter reads.

This story was originally published November 30, 2021 3:35 PM.

Gov. Henry McMaster, Lt. Gov. Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster’s Weekly Schedule, March 7, 2022

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Governor Henry McMaster, Lieutenant Governor Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster's schedules for the week of March 7 will include the following:Monday, March 7 at 9:30 AM: Lt. Governor Evette spoke at the YMCA of Greenville’s Annual Day of Giving event, Prisma Health YMCA Branch, 550 Brookwood Point Place, Simpsonville, S.C.Monday, March 7 at 12:00 PM: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Cybersecurity Symposium hosted by South Coast Cyber Center, Tabby Place, 91...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Governor Henry McMaster, Lieutenant Governor Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster's schedules for the week of March 7 will include the following:

Monday, March 7 at 9:30 AM: Lt. Governor Evette spoke at the YMCA of Greenville’s Annual Day of Giving event, Prisma Health YMCA Branch, 550 Brookwood Point Place, Simpsonville, S.C.

Monday, March 7 at 12:00 PM: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Cybersecurity Symposium hosted by South Coast Cyber Center, Tabby Place, 913 Port Republic Street, Beaufort, S.C.

Tuesday, March 8 at 10:00 AM: Gov. McMaster will join the Charleston County Aviation Authority, Explore Charleston, and Breeze Airways for a special announcement, Charleston International Airport, Central Hall, 5500 International Boulevard, Charleston, S.C.

Wednesday, March 9 at 12:15 PM: Gov. McMaster will speak to the South Carolina State Firefighters’ Association luncheon, State House grounds, Columbia, S.C.

Thursday, March 10 at 11:30 AM: Gov. McMaster will present the Order of the Palmetto to Stonewall Richburg, Governor’s Office, State House, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

Saturday, March 12 at 10:00 AM: Lt. Gov. Evette will speak at the Passion FORE Fashion, Empowering our Future Leaders’ Girls Golf event sponsored by First Tee – Upstate South Carolina, The Carolina Country Club, 2355 Carolina Country Club Road, Spartanburg, S.C.

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Gov. Henry McMaster’s Weekly Schedule: February 28, 2022

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Gov. Henry McMaster’s schedule for the week of February 28, 2022, included:

Monday, February 28

2:00 PM: Gov. McMaster and First Lady Peggy McMaster joined the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism for the Tourism Student Awards, Lace House, Governor’s Mansion complex, 803 Richland Street, Columbia, S.C.

4:00 PM: Policy meeting.

6:06 PM: Call with a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives.

Tuesday, March 1

8:30 AM: Gov. McMaster held a COVID-19 briefing call with state agencies.

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, first floor, Columbia, S.C.

10:00 AM: Economic development meeting.

11:00 AM: Policy meeting.

12:15 PM: Media interview.

1:00 PM: Gov. McMaster met with representatives from Clemson University and recognized the National Champion Soccer Team.

1:30 PM: Policy meeting.

2:00 PM: Constituent meeting.

2:30 PM: Policy meeting.

3:00 PM: Constituent meeting.

4:00 PM: Economic development meeting.

5:00 PM: Policy meeting.

6:15 PM: Gov. McMaster and First Lady Peggy McMaster attended the Clemson Day at the State House Reception, The Hall at Senate’s End, 320 Senate Street, Columbia, S.C.

Wednesday, March 2

12:04 PM: Call with a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives.

3:00 PM: Gov. McMaster spoke at the Automotive Summit, Hyatt Regency, Regency Ballroom, 220 N. Main Street, Greenville S.C.

4:15 PM: Economic development meeting.

Thursday, March 3

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, first floor, Columbia, S.C.

9:30 AM: Gov. McMaster held a press conference with law enforcement and agency leaders, State House, north steps, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

12:00 PM: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Greater Indian Land Chamber of Commerce, Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church, 238 Fort Mill Highway, Fort Mill, S.C.

2:00 PM: Gov. McMaster participated in a ribbon cutting, Crossridge One, 3000 WorldReach Drive, Indian Land, S.C.

Friday, March 4

8:45 PM: Gov. McMaster presented the Order of the Palmetto to Stan Smith, honoring his 50-year tennis career and service to Boys & Girls Club, Hilton Head Island community, and South Carolina, Hilton Head Island, S.C.

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Group Seeks Unionization at Giti Tire's South Carolina Plant

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A coalition including state representatives, pastors and union leaders is asking a tire manufacturer to improve conditions at its South Carolina production facilities, including allowing workers to unionize.Tuesday, a group describing itself as “concerned community members, human rights advocates, clergy, elected officials, political activists, labor union leaders, and educators who are committed to ra...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A coalition including state representatives, pastors and union leaders is asking a tire manufacturer to improve conditions at its South Carolina production facilities, including allowing workers to unionize.

Tuesday, a group describing itself as “concerned community members, human rights advocates, clergy, elected officials, political activists, labor union leaders, and educators who are committed to raising standards” planned to deliver a letter to Phang Wai Yeen, CEO of Giti Tire Manufacturing Ltd., according to a copy of the document provided in advance to The Associated Press.

“Workers have reported mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, low wages and the inability to have time off to spend with their family without retaliation,” according to the letter.

In 2014, Giti officials announced to much fanfare that they would build the Singapore-based company's first U.S. plant in Richburg, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of Columbia, starting production three years later, expecting to make several million tires a year when fully operational. The announcement was the culmination of an effort to make South Carolina the nation’s chief tire manufacturer, with other tire makers in the state including Michelin, Bridgestone, Continental and Trelleborg.

The company was central to a 2019 lawsuit by Democratic state Sen. Dick Harpootlian, who said he wanted to force state Commerce Department officials to reveal details of taxpayer-funded incentives intended to lure businesses, including Giti, to the state. Last year, a judge ruled the Commerce Department had violated the state open-records law by keeping from the public details about millions of dollars in state grants and corporate tax incentives.

The Commerce Department has appealed that order, but Harpootlian told the AP earlier this year that he hopes both sides can work out the situation.

Tuesday's letter includes signatures from several labor unions. Those include the United Steelworkers, which already represents some South Carolina workers at Liberty Steel in Georgetown but does not have a contingent at Giti, though members have demonstrated outside the facility before.

Earlier this year, the union criticized the tire maker for “misspending millions in COVID-19 stimulus funds.” That critique followed a report accusing Giti of taking nearly $10 million in federal Paycheck Protection Program funds — including around $8 million at its South Carolina facility — yet not calling 100 employees back to work following a shuttering of several weeks early in the pandemic.

At the time, Giti officials said the company had appropriately qualified for the assistance, and furloughed workers had been offered jobs by August 2020, although some declined.

In an op-ed this summer, Phang wrote that, like others, Giti was “blindsided” by the pandemic but “has no questions about its decision to start its operations in Chester County,” where the company’s commitment “is stronger than ever.”

On Tuesday, a Giti representative said the company welcomed “sincere and legitimate input” but added that, during the pandemic, Giti employees had shifted “to a more predictable work schedule,” and that they “can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.”

“You can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success,” David Shelton, Giti’s industry relations director, told the AP. “These are facts people need to know if deciding whether a union is best for them and their families.”

Asking that Giti affirm “the rights of workers to organize for their own safety and for job security without the fear of harassment, discrimination or job loss,” signatories to the letter — who include several members of the state Legislature who represent the area — requested a meeting with company officials.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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