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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Richburg, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Richburg:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Richburg, SC

Lander University professor caught on camera comforting student’s baby during class

A Lander University professor was recently caught on camera comforting a student's baby during classGREENWOOD, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - Peterra Richburg brought an unexpected guest to her Math 201 class at Lander University, her two-month-old daughter Aria.“I was really nervous like everybody was going to be like why does she have a baby with her,” said Richburg.After a change in childcare that day, Richburg brought her daughter to class.Her classmates and professor, Dr. Samuel Reed, were excited for Aria...

A Lander University professor was recently caught on camera comforting a student's baby during class

GREENWOOD, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - Peterra Richburg brought an unexpected guest to her Math 201 class at Lander University, her two-month-old daughter Aria.

“I was really nervous like everybody was going to be like why does she have a baby with her,” said Richburg.

After a change in childcare that day, Richburg brought her daughter to class.

Her classmates and professor, Dr. Samuel Reed, were excited for Aria to join them for the hour and 15-minute class.

Aria fell asleep after being fed, but when Richburg went to the restroom, her daughter woke up and started crying.

“I thought, well, I could either just pick her up and see if I could comfort her or I could let her keep crying and try to teach over top of a crying baby,” said Reed.

So the Associate Professor of Mathematics at Lander University comforted the two-month-old while teaching the day’s lesson.

“Some of my students were like, oh my goodness, he just picked up this baby. And I quickly reassured them I’m a dad, I know what I’m doing. Everything is going to be okay,” he said.

Richburg took some photos of Reed holding her child and shared them on social media.

“From the time I told my advisor that I was pregnant and like I was scared I was going to leave Lander, move back to Charleston and just go to Charleston Southern and be two years behind. I was like I have to leave because I was like I don’t know what I was going to do but they helped me every step of the way,” she said.

On top of studying Elementary Education, Richburg is raising her newborn, commutes an hour one way to get to class, and drives DoorDash some nights to earn extra money.

“It’s hard, but I got it,” said Richburg.

Doctor Reed wants to help Richburg achieve her goals in any way he can, just like many other professors at Lander University.

“She is just such a bright and capable student I really couldn’t be more proud,” he says. “We’re dedicated to serving our students.”

Reed says Aria is welcome back to his class anytime. However, while Richburg wants to bring her back to campus at some point, she doesn’t know if Aria will be in attendance for Math 201 again anytime soon.

Copyright 2022 WHNS. All rights reserved.

College student was in ‘quandary’ after childcare change — then a professor stepped in

A South Carolina mom had a change in her childcare routine — then experienced a moment of “compassion.”When other plans fell through, college student Peterra Richburg was left in a “quandary.” Her only option was to bring her 2-month-old daughter to campus with her, to the delight of her classmates at Lander University, the school said Sept. 9 in a news r...

A South Carolina mom had a change in her childcare routine — then experienced a moment of “compassion.”

When other plans fell through, college student Peterra Richburg was left in a “quandary.” Her only option was to bring her 2-month-old daughter to campus with her, to the delight of her classmates at Lander University, the school said Sept. 9 in a news release.

But when Richburg, a senior elementary education major, left math class to go to the restroom, her baby started making a fuss, WHNS reported.

“I figured we could ignore her cries until Mom returned, or I could hold her and see if I could help,” Samuel Reed, an assistant mathematics professor, said in the release. “So, I picked her up and continued teaching.

“I also wanted Peterra to not feel distracted and be able to actively participate with her peers around her. Plus, who doesn’t want to hold a cute baby!?”

Photos shared on social media show the professor comforting his student’s baby, allowing her to focus on taking notes during class. Several people who commented online praised Reed for his actions.

“The world needs more people like this man,” one Facebook user wrote.

Another person commented: “I love this! So glad we have professors who can adjust to our students and their needs when home and school life collides!”

Reed, himself the dad of a toddler, said he’s “not a unique Lander professor who goes out of their way to accommodate students.” In 2016, one of his colleagues gained attention after holding a student’s sleeping baby, according to the school.

After the latest gesture, Richburg said she appreciated the attention given to her young daughter, Aria.

“My baby is only two months old and she’s already in college,” Richburg wrote in a Facebook post. “I love my University and Dr. Reed for supporting me, thanks guys.”

Lander University is a public school that had nearly 4,000 students in fall 2021. The campus is in Greenwood, roughly 55 miles south of Greenville.

Giti Tire responds to local leaders’ complaints of unfair treatment at SC plant

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.“Giti Tire is proud to call South C...

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.

David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.

The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.

Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.

“Giti Tire is proud to call South Carolina home to our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility where dedicated team members produce high-quality, American-made tires. We’ve been able to provide an exceptional array of jobs in Chester County for operators, technicians, polymer experts, engineers in chemical, mechanical, civil, computer science, and electrical fields, administrative, finance and accounting, and many others all while providing strong benefits and competitive salaries.

“As a member of the Chester County community, Giti Tire always welcomes sincere and legitimate input from our team members and other community members. As a core principle, Giti Tire works very hard to ensure we have all the facts and accurate information before taking action. We certainly hope others will also be diligent in confirming the facts and evaluating items coming from parties outside of our Chester County operations who are providing false and misleading information. We recognize this is part of an organized, union-led effort. People who have been a part of our community, and surrounding communities, know that you can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success. These are facts people need to know before even thinking a union is best for them and their families.

“At Giti Tire, we have always recognized that our team members are the strength of our operations and the key to our future success. This was exceptionally clear as the United States reopened from the COVID-19 shutdown. Like many companies, we experienced an increase in demand for our products, requiring a dramatic production response. Our Giti Tire team joined together and sacrificed time and energy to restart operations and serve our customers. Once operations fully restarted and demand normalized, our production and schedules also returned to a more balanced work life experience and we were able to provide a salary increase for many.

“Over the last 20 months, Giti Tire has also increased employee communications and engagement as we have worked to navigate the pandemic. Our 600 employees are our number one priority and most valuable asset. We believe they can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.

“Therefore, we always welcome the opportunity to hear from employees and provide open lines of communications. We also want to ensure citizens in South Carolina know the facts and we look forward to sharing our story. Chester County is an excellent home for Giti Tire. We are continuing to invest in our South Carolina operations as we plan to be here for many years to come.”

A group of concerned citizens walked to the gates of the Giti plant on Nov. 23.

They attempted to hand-deliver a letter signed by a coalition of 27 local leaders, including two S.C. State Representatives, county officials from York and Chester counties, Chester City council members and Chester Mayor Wanda Stringfellow.

They also were joined by representatives of the United Steelworkers Union, which released a statement last March denouncing Giti.

The group was not allowed to leave the letter at the security gate at the entrance to the facility.

A law enforcement officer on the scene took a copy of the letter and promised to contact S.C. State Rep. John King when it had been delivered. As of Tuesday afternoon, King said, to his knowledge, the letter hand not yet reached Giti officials.

The letter, obtained by The Herald, asks for a meeting to discuss unfair working conditions at the plant.

“Workers have reported mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, low wages, and the inability to have time off with their families without retaliation. When workers have raised concerns your company has begun intimidating and even threatening to close the plant if they decide to exercise their right to protected, concerted activity,” the letter reads.

This story was originally published November 30, 2021 3:35 PM.

Florida dog lost amid SC crash. But thanks to community, Goofuss is now safely home

On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.Firefighters and other emergency...

On July 17, a tiny dog from Florida named “Goofuss” ran from a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate 77 in rural Chester County in South Carolina.

There were tears. There were searches. There were Facebook posts. And there were good people doing good things for a stranger they had never met.

Now, Goofuss is safe. Goofuss is home in Florida, because the good people of Chester County cared.

Firefighters and other emergency workers responded to the crash that night. They looked for the chihuahua that had dashed into the woods.

“He had darted into the woods and we just couldn’t find him,” said T. Melton, chief at Richburg Fire & Rescue. “It was dark.”

The owner of the dog, Jean Powers, was a woman in her 80s from Florida, Melton said. This was not just some dog. It was family.

Powers had adopted the dog years ago and the two had been inseparable.

Powers and family members including John Ladd of Union County, N.C., searched for days for the dog and kept in touch with Melton and others. Firefighters searched and volunteers searched. Chester County Animal Control assisted with a humane trap that was put near the site where the crash happened, Ladd said.

“It was heartbreaking,” Ladd said.

Powers herself stayed in Chester County for days and searched near the scene, said Ladd.

“She was out there looking at age 87,” Ladd said.

Ladd said Powers finally returned to Florida while others continued to look.

Richburg Fire & Rescue posted on its Facebook page -- a page that is a central way of communicating in rural Chester County -- about the missing dog. The word spread as the posts were shared.

Then on Tuesday, more than two weeks after the dog was lost, Melton’s cellphone rang. In a small rural place, people have the fire chief’s number.

It was a lady who works at the BP station near the highway. She told how a Chester County couple had seen the social media postings and believed the missing dog had wandered to their house, Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control officers and firefighters rushed to the home of Amber Moore to see if the dog’s microchip matched the owner.

“Sure enough, it was the same dog,” Melton said.

Chester County Animal Control Director Kelli Simoneau said Jesse Rucker-Roof and Trish Zimmerman from her office confirmed the identity of Goofuss and arranged for the dog to be picked up late Tuesday by Ladd.

Ladd’s wife drove Goofuss all the way to Florida Wednesday.

“So many people pulled together to help out,” Ladd said. “It is just wonderful.”

Powers said in a Facebook posting that her prayers had been answered with Goofuss being found and returned.

“I owe a great deal of thanks to all the people who have made this possible,” Powers wrote.

In a phone interview Thursday from her Florida home, Powers said she and the searchers in Chester County -- a rural county hundreds of miles from her home and located about half way between Charlotte and Columbia-- never gave up, even though after two weeks hope was waning.

“The people there were just wonderful” Powers said.

Powers said Goofuss, age 6, back home in Florida spent the first day relaxing.

“I gave him treats and he’s relaxing” Powers said.

Simoneau of animal control in Chester said the combined efforts of all involved brought a lady from Florida in her 80s her dog after it was lost following a traffic collision. She urged all pet owners to have a microchip placed on a pet so that there is no confusion about if the dog is the right dog.

Goofuss sure was the right dog.

Animal control does the microchip service, Simoneau said.

Richburg is a small place, with less than 1,000 residents but with a busy . It sits in a rural county with around 32,000 residents between Rock Hill and Columbia.

But the people there care about each other and look out for each other.

The job is help people. Work together. That’s what people in rural Chester County did yet again when there was a need, Melton said.

The public, the firefighters, the animal control workers.

“There’s a word for it,” Melton said. “Community.”

Lander University professor comforts crying classroom 'visitor,' offering 'Compassion in Class'

GREENWOOD, S.C. —(This article was submitted to WYFF4.com by Karen Petit, Writer, University Relations and Publications, Lander University.)The challenges of a college math class can reduce many students to tears.But when a visitor to Dr. Samuel Reed’s class at Lander University began crying, he did the unexpected. The assistant professor of math education picked up the visitor and continued teaching.The “visitor” was Aria, the 2-month-old daughter of Peterra Richb...

GREENWOOD, S.C. —

(This article was submitted to WYFF4.com by Karen Petit, Writer, University Relations and Publications, Lander University.)

The challenges of a college math class can reduce many students to tears.

But when a visitor to Dr. Samuel Reed’s class at Lander University began crying, he did the unexpected. The assistant professor of math education picked up the visitor and continued teaching.

The “visitor” was Aria, the 2-month-old daughter of Peterra Richburg, a senior majoring in elementary education and a student in Reed’s class.

A last-minute change in childcare put Richburg in a quandary. Should she stay home and miss class or go to campus? Richburg, determined to stay on track for her May 2023 graduation, put Aria in the car and headed to Lander. “I didn’t have time to let Dr. Reed know that I was bringing her with me. I was so nervous about it.”

While their arrival may have been a surprise to her classmates, the response was joyous. “They were saying, ‘there’s a baby in the class,’ ” said Richburg, who was grateful for the welcoming reception Aria received.

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When Aria became a bit fussy, Reed scooped her up and continued teaching so that Richburg could take notes. Aria was comforted, and the class continued.

“She was alert and looking around when Dr. Reed was holding her,” she said. “It was very sweet.”

Richburg snapped a photo and shared it on social media with the tag “Compassion In Class.” It caught the attention of people on campus and beyond.

Aria is the first baby to attend one of Reed’s classes.

“I was surprised and excited by baby Aria's visit to the class! Peterra had not brought her to class this semester, and I did not even know she was a new mom,” he said.

When Aria became fussy, “I figured we could ignore her cries until Mom returned, or I could hold her and see if I could help. So, I picked her up and continued teaching,” said Reed, who was leading a class on how to teach addition to students. “I also wanted Peterra to not feel distracted and be able to actively participate with her peers around her. Plus, who doesn't want to hold a cute baby!? Guests, especially cute babies, are always a pleasant visit.”

The father of a 2-year-old child, Reed said, “As a parent, I think I have always had a healthy expectation that ‘my community is going to help me raise this child, right?’ I feel it would be rather hypocritical of me to not be willing to turn around and help another parent who needs a little love and compassion in the moment.”

Reed said he is very fortunate to be a faculty member at Lander and to be a member of the Lander community.

“I am not a unique Lander professor who goes out of their way to accommodate students. In fact, I am not even the first of my colleagues in the mathematics department to go viral for holding a student's baby and continuing to teach,” he said.

Reed is referring to Dr. Josie Ryan. In 2016, a photo of Ryan holding a baby during her class received national and international attention. The viral moment occurred when a student began the academic year and gave birth during the second week. Ryan asked her the new mother, Sarah Thompson, to bring the newborn to class. Sarah was hesitant at first. But a hectic day sent her and son, Isaiah, to class. Ryan taught with the sleeping baby in her arms, and Isaiah went to the class on other occasions.

Richburg, a Charleston native, hopes to return to the Lowcountry and teach at Charleston Morningside Middle, where she once was a student. For now, she juggles her classes with a one-hour commute to Lander and student teaching. “I get up every morning after having no rest,” she said. “I don’t mind. Aria is my world. I love her so much.”

Will Aria return to Lander?

“Dr. Reed said that I can bring Aria back any time,” Richburg said. “I’m not sure when that will be, but maybe on a day when I’m not student teaching.”

And in another 18 years or so, maybe Aria can be a Lander Bearcat, too.

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