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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Richburg, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Richburg:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Richburg, SC

Interstate 77 northbound reopens in Chester County

RICHBURG, S.C. — All lanes of Interstate 77 in Chester County near Richburg, South Carolina were closed because of a crash midday Friday.A short time later, officials were able to open one of the two lanes but delays remained.Northbound drivers can detour beginning at Exit 48, where they can take State Highway 200 west and then State Highway 901 north. U.S. Route 21 through Great Falls and U.S. 321 through the city of Chester can also be used as detours....

RICHBURG, S.C. — All lanes of Interstate 77 in Chester County near Richburg, South Carolina were closed because of a crash midday Friday.

A short time later, officials were able to open one of the two lanes but delays remained.

Northbound drivers can detour beginning at Exit 48, where they can take State Highway 200 west and then State Highway 901 north. U.S. Route 21 through Great Falls and U.S. 321 through the city of Chester can also be used as detours.

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While the southbound lanes remained open, southbound drivers were also experiencing delays.

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The southbound delays begin before Exit 65 for Lancaster Highway.

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How SC's rural Chester County landed $1.3B Albemarle Corp. lithium project

Kris Phillips helped lead Chester County Economic Development's charge to land a major project from Albemarle Corp.He hoped to land the $1.3 billion investment to make Chester County a pillar of Albemarle's lithium ecosystem in the Charlotte region. Phillips, assistant director of the economic development group, chased the project under t...

Kris Phillips helped lead Chester County Economic Development's charge to land a major project from Albemarle Corp.

He hoped to land the $1.3 billion investment to make Chester County a pillar of Albemarle's lithium ecosystem in the Charlotte region. Phillips, assistant director of the economic development group, chased the project under the code name Project Raven for nearly a year.

When asked about the emotional toll of such a pursuit, Phillips admitted the process was exhausting.

He replied: "You got about three hours to go through that?"

In the end, though, it was worth it.

In March, the Charlotte-based company's $1.3 billion lithium hydroxide processing facility in Richburg was formally announced. Construction on the project is expected to begin next year on the roughly 800-acre Richburg Magnolias site. On that timeline, operations would begin in 2026.

Tyler Windsor, Albemarle's operations manager for the Chester County facility, was the keynote speaker at yesterday's S.C. I-77 Alliance annual economic development summit. The infrastructure around the Richburg site was critical to Albemarle choosing to land there. The decision was validation for Phillips and Robert Long, director of the county's economic development team, after they worked to court Albemarle for 11 months.

"We identified the project from the very start as being a really good fit for Chester County because (Albemarle) needed rail and they need a lot of natural gas, which are two things we can provide to projects like that," Phillips said. "From the very beginning, we knew we would be a good fit but we also knew it would be very competitive. At that time, there were at least three or four states in consideration."

Along with the rail access, Windsor said proximity to ports and Interstate 77 was appealing for Albemarle, as was the broader region's workforce.

The Richburg Magnolias site along S.C. Highway 9 has long been touted by local leaders as one with potential. In early 2022, a plan was hatched to develop much of the site as a multi-building industrial park. The first building there was expected to be a speculative project of 105,000 square feet, and a pad was put down on the site as part of that effort.

However, Phillips and his team thought the site was a good fit for a major project from a single user. It was considered as a potential home for another marquee Chester County project — E. & J. Gallo Winery's massive East Coast operations hub. Gallo began operations late last year at its chosen site in Fort Lawn.

While the Richburg Magnolias was not chosen for that project in 2021, the process of getting it ready to pitch was productive. Gallo considering the site laid the groundwork for Albemarle to land there.

"We were able to leverage that project to get a lot of due diligence done," Phillips said of Gallo's interest in the Richburg site. "Having that information already in place was a huge, huge benefit to when we started to get into the weeds with Albemarle."

Albemarle is expected to create over 300 jobs at the Chester County facility, which will be developed in two phases. Those jobs will have average annual wages of $93,000, Windsor said yesterday. He added that the site's size leaves room for potential future expansions after the current project is completed.

Landing Albemarle, alongside other notable projects in the area such as Gallo, was a key victory for Chester County.

"There were times we hit some panic modes, but we stuck with it, found solutions and, 11 months later, we got that announcement on March 22," Phillips said.

A new 700-acre manufacturing project in Chester County is taking shape - quickly

Details continue to take shape, quickly, on a new Chester County manufacturing project spanning 700 acres.Chester County Council passed the first of three votes needed to rezone the property, on Wednesday night. The county planning commission had narrowly voted to approve the zoning changes. With two special called meetings, county council could finalize the zoning changes by March 13.“This thing is time sensitive,” Council Chairman Joe Branham.Richburg Magnolias of Chester applied to rezone two properties. T...

Details continue to take shape, quickly, on a new Chester County manufacturing project spanning 700 acres.

Chester County Council passed the first of three votes needed to rezone the property, on Wednesday night. The county planning commission had narrowly voted to approve the zoning changes. With two special called meetings, county council could finalize the zoning changes by March 13.

“This thing is time sensitive,” Council Chairman Joe Branham.

Richburg Magnolias of Chester applied to rezone two properties. The larger is 470 acres at 4375 Lancaster Highway, near Richburg Road. The smaller is 218 acres of unaddressed property off Lancaster Highway (S.C. 9). Advanced Chester of Sumter applied to rezone 22 acres at 510 Juniors Place.

The total property is east of I-77, between Richburg and Fort Lawn. County land records show the properties were involved in a 2018 sale for $4.5 million.

The new company hasn’t been named.

Kris Phillips with Chester County Economic Development updated county council last week on changes proposed by the company based on the planning commission meeting.

A rail line would be moved from the northeastern corner of the site near Bryant Corner Road, to the northwestern side to be farther away from homes on Bryant Corner. Only an administration building on a slab for a former spec facility, and not any manufacturing, would be within a 1,000-foot setback of nearby properties. There would be no road access off Bryant Corner to the adminstrative building.

“There’s no manufacturing, no processing there,” Phillips said.

All truck access would come off Lancaster Highway. The company would build a bridge over the highway for a rail line. Chemicals brought in wouldn’t be flammable or designated as high-risk to the environment by federal regulations, Phillips said.

Matt Gedney with L&C Railroad owner Gulf & Ohio Railways said the local line tries to steer clear of hazardous material transport and the new company would be no different.

“Nothing that is outside the mix of what we currently bring in,” Gedney said.

L&C serves some chemical and polymer facilities in the area. There’s a propane terminal in Lancaster County. But not sites with federally designated hazardous chemicals. The growing number of manufacturing facilities in Chester County also helps with safety concerns, Gedney said, as rail travels at a relatively low speed.

Phillips said the company is looking at sound walls and structures to avoid sound or light issues. The company intends to rely mostly on rail, but will evaluate what truck traffic the site will create. The company has spent tens of millions, Phillips said, at other sites to make sure environmental damage or air quality won’t be an issue.

Phillips said there will be significant activity on site.

“It’ll be a 24-7 operation,” Phillips said.

The planning commission voted 3-2 to recommend two of the zoning changes. The other, the largest property farthest from neighboring homes, got a 4-1 vote for recommendation.

Councilwoman Erin Mosley cast the only council vote against the zoning changes. Mosley said it wasn’t a slight to the company, but instead she felt more time is needed to study plans.

Plans would include a new 20-foot high by 40-foot wide berm to further insulate the site. Another part of the decision states if the property is rezoned and the company doesn’t bring the planned business, the zoning would revert to what it is now by November.

Local Veteran, educator turns 100; honored by County Council, Columbia Mayor, and S.C. Governor

The Richburg family is honored to celebrate the 100th birthday of patriarch Stonewall McKinney Richburg on Saturday, August 14 at Spring Valley High School. Festivities begin with a birthday drive-by at 10 a.m. and conclude with a proclamation from Richland County Council, a presentation of the Centenarian Award from the Office of Governor Henry McMaster, and anticipated remarks from Steve Benjamin, Mayor of the City of Columbia.Stonewall McKinney Richburg was born in Tuskegee, Alabama on August 14, 1921. Richburg began serving his co...

The Richburg family is honored to celebrate the 100th birthday of patriarch Stonewall McKinney Richburg on Saturday, August 14 at Spring Valley High School. Festivities begin with a birthday drive-by at 10 a.m. and conclude with a proclamation from Richland County Council, a presentation of the Centenarian Award from the Office of Governor Henry McMaster, and anticipated remarks from Steve Benjamin, Mayor of the City of Columbia.

Stonewall McKinney Richburg was born in Tuskegee, Alabama on August 14, 1921. Richburg began serving his country upon induction into the United States Army in 1943. His first assignment was to the Columbia (SC) Army Air Base. In 1945, he completed the Army Engineer Officer Candidate School, where he was among the top ten of 91 graduates (and the only African-American) from a class of 334 candidates. He served in the Philippines during World War II from 1945-1946 and in the Korean conflict from 1951-1952. Richburg retired from the military in 1961 as Captain in the Army Reserve Corps of Engineers.

While serving in the Army, Richburg made Columbia his home and began his career as an educator in 1946. While attending church service with his future wife and her family, Richburg was introduced to Mr. C. A. Johnson, then Supervisor of Negro Schools. Shortly thereafter, Johnson offered Richburg a position at Booker T. Washington High School (“BTWHS”), a segregated school in Columbia, as its first teacher of mechanical drawing and blueprint reading. Richburg became principal of BTWHS in 1965. His seven years as principal included the beginning of desegregation and the start of the integration of Richland County schools. Public school desegregation in the state and the expansion of the University of South Carolina led to the closing of BTWHS in 1974. At that time, Richburg began working at the school district office.

Richburg retired from education in 1983, after 37 years of service in Columbia and Richland County School District One. Following his retirement, he continued to work for the district as a substitute for administrators and maintained his membership in the National Education Association, the South Carolina Education Association, the Richland County Education Association, and other professional education organizations including Phi Delta Kappa. In 2011, Richburg was one of six inductees into the district’s Hall of Fame, the highest honor bestowed upon individuals by the district’s Board of School Commissioners.

Richburg maintains membership in several organizations, to include the Booker T. Washington High School Foundation and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated. He is featured in the University of South Carolina Museum of Education’s “So Their Voices Will Never Be Forgotten” exhibition. Richburg visited the university to discuss the struggle for civil rights and the desegregation of schools in Columbia with students pursuing careers in education. Richburg is an alumnus of Columbia’s Alpha Iota Boulé of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity— the oldest African-American Greekletter fraternity.

Richburg, who is affectionately called “Stoney,” was blessed with 71 years of marriage to the late Geneva Smith, a Columbia native. Together, they share four children, eight grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren —many of whom will be participating in the birthday drive-by in Columbia to commemorate this milestone birthday and legacy.

Giti Tire responds to local leaders’ complaints of unfair treatment at SC plant

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.“Giti Tire is proud to call South C...

A Giti Tire Manufacturing (USA) representative has released a statement following complaints about labor practices at the plant in Richburg, S.C.

David Shelton, Director of Industry Relations, released the following statement Monday afternoon. The response came after a group tried to hand-deliver a letter to the plant last week.

The letter cited problems with labor practices and asked for a response from Giti by Dec. 3.

Here is the content of the statement released by Shelton.

“Giti Tire is proud to call South Carolina home to our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility where dedicated team members produce high-quality, American-made tires. We’ve been able to provide an exceptional array of jobs in Chester County for operators, technicians, polymer experts, engineers in chemical, mechanical, civil, computer science, and electrical fields, administrative, finance and accounting, and many others all while providing strong benefits and competitive salaries.

“As a member of the Chester County community, Giti Tire always welcomes sincere and legitimate input from our team members and other community members. As a core principle, Giti Tire works very hard to ensure we have all the facts and accurate information before taking action. We certainly hope others will also be diligent in confirming the facts and evaluating items coming from parties outside of our Chester County operations who are providing false and misleading information. We recognize this is part of an organized, union-led effort. People who have been a part of our community, and surrounding communities, know that you can have problems with union representation that can hurt job security and long-term success. These are facts people need to know before even thinking a union is best for them and their families.

“At Giti Tire, we have always recognized that our team members are the strength of our operations and the key to our future success. This was exceptionally clear as the United States reopened from the COVID-19 shutdown. Like many companies, we experienced an increase in demand for our products, requiring a dramatic production response. Our Giti Tire team joined together and sacrificed time and energy to restart operations and serve our customers. Once operations fully restarted and demand normalized, our production and schedules also returned to a more balanced work life experience and we were able to provide a salary increase for many.

“Over the last 20 months, Giti Tire has also increased employee communications and engagement as we have worked to navigate the pandemic. Our 600 employees are our number one priority and most valuable asset. We believe they can, and should, be able to communicate directly with us without the need of a third party such as a union.

“Therefore, we always welcome the opportunity to hear from employees and provide open lines of communications. We also want to ensure citizens in South Carolina know the facts and we look forward to sharing our story. Chester County is an excellent home for Giti Tire. We are continuing to invest in our South Carolina operations as we plan to be here for many years to come.”

A group of concerned citizens walked to the gates of the Giti plant on Nov. 23.

They attempted to hand-deliver a letter signed by a coalition of 27 local leaders, including two S.C. State Representatives, county officials from York and Chester counties, Chester City council members and Chester Mayor Wanda Stringfellow.

They also were joined by representatives of the United Steelworkers Union, which released a statement last March denouncing Giti.

The group was not allowed to leave the letter at the security gate at the entrance to the facility.

A law enforcement officer on the scene took a copy of the letter and promised to contact S.C. State Rep. John King when it had been delivered. As of Tuesday afternoon, King said, to his knowledge, the letter hand not yet reached Giti officials.

The letter, obtained by The Herald, asks for a meeting to discuss unfair working conditions at the plant.

“Workers have reported mandatory overtime, unpredictable schedules, low wages, and the inability to have time off with their families without retaliation. When workers have raised concerns your company has begun intimidating and even threatening to close the plant if they decide to exercise their right to protected, concerted activity,” the letter reads.

This story was originally published November 30, 2021, 3:35 PM.

610-639-4456

Tobie Nell Perkins works for the Herald in partnership with Report For America. She covers Chester County, the Catawba Indian Nation and general assignments. Tobie graduated from the University of Florida and has won a regional Murrow Award as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Florida Society of News Editors.

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