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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Rock Hill, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Rock Hill:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Rock Hill, SC

Rock Hill, SC, Sues Carolina Panthers' Owner Over Canceled $800M Facility

The City of Rock Hill, S.C., has filed an adversarial lawsuit to recover $20 million plus damages from developers of the now-canceled Carolina Panthers $800-million headquarters and practice facility.The Sept. 7 filing in federal court in Delaware is part of ongoing bankruptcy proceedings for GT Real Estate Holdings, LLC, created by Panthers owner David Tepper to manage the 234...

The City of Rock Hill, S.C., has filed an adversarial lawsuit to recover $20 million plus damages from developers of the now-canceled Carolina Panthers $800-million headquarters and practice facility.

The Sept. 7 filing in federal court in Delaware is part of ongoing bankruptcy proceedings for GT Real Estate Holdings, LLC, created by Panthers owner David Tepper to manage the 234-acre mixed-use project in Rock Hill.

The city, which had agreed in 2019 to issue $225 million in bonds to fund infrastructure improvements at the site, accuses GTRE of intentionally breaching its contractual obligations, claiming the company “failed to timely provide the necessary documents and information as to the development of the Project, failed to sign and deliver the documents necessary for the issuance of tax-exempt bonds and twice prevented the City from proceeding to an initial bond closing.”

In January 2022, 18 months after the Mascaro Construction/Barton Mallow CM-at-risk joint venture broke ground on the project, the lawsuit contends, GTRE told the city to cancel the bond sale, and that the project would be scaled back to include only the centerpiece five-story, 600,000-sq-ft indoor practice facility.

GTRE halted construction in March, saying at the time that “our partners have been unable to contribute the agreed-upon investment to fund the construction of the public infrastructure.”

Although Rock Hill offered to help find ways to keep the project alive, including a $135-million bond offering, the Panthers ultimately pulled the plug in mid-April. GTRE filed for bankruptcy protection less than two months later.

“GTRE’s conduct in breaching the contract is characterized by dishonesty in fact, unfair dealing, or the unlawful appropriation of the City’s property,” the filing says. “GTRE is liable to the City for breach of contract accompanied by fraud.” The filing also requests a jury trial to settle the matter.

In a separate filing to the bankruptcy court, GTRE attorneys responded that Rock Hill’s lawsuit is based on “false and incendiary claims,” and that the company had invested $240 million in the project. It was only after the city failed to meet its obligations under “unambiguous” and “good faith” agreements with GTRE, the filing claims, that the project had to be canceled.

The amount sought by Rock Hill’s lawsuit is similar to the minimum amount it would receive from net proceeds of the property’s sale, under GTRE’s proposed restructuring plan filed in August. The plan, which has not been approved by the court, also provides nearly $61 million to settle claims from Mascaro/Barton Mallow and other contractors involved with the project.

Gun found at Rock Hill HS, marking third in 3 days within S.C. school district

The gun was found inside a student’s car on Wednesday after deputies received a tip.This gun was found today at Rock Hill High School. The school district says it stepped up security because of the recent incidents with guns.ROCK HILL, S.C. (WBTV) - A gun was found in a student’s car at Rock Hill High School on Wednesday, the York County Sheriff’s Office said.This comes after two guns had already been found at schools within the district this academic year, with all three now being discovered within t...

The gun was found inside a student’s car on Wednesday after deputies received a tip.

This gun was found today at Rock Hill High School. The school district says it stepped up security because of the recent incidents with guns.

ROCK HILL, S.C. (WBTV) - A gun was found in a student’s car at Rock Hill High School on Wednesday, the York County Sheriff’s Office said.

This comes after two guns had already been found at schools within the district this academic year, with all three now being discovered within the past three days.

Deputies searched the student’s vehicle after receiving a tip.

The student was confronted and took off running. Deputies are still attempting to track down that student.

”We will be more proactive in addressing safety and security in all of our schools,” Rock Hill Schools district spokesperson Lindsay Machak said. “When it comes to district administration, this is the kind of stuff that keeps us up at night. This is the thing that worries us. This is the thing we are consistently, constantly worried about and trying to improve upon.”

The school district has already put some measures, such as random searches, into place to improve security. The district is pushing the 24-hour tipline that everyone can use.

Schools in the district have metal detectors, but they aren’t currently meant for everyday use. The school board could elect to change that.

“The number one goal is to make sure that everyone in that building is safe and secure,” board chairwoman and Rock Hill Schools parent Helena Miller said.

Miller said that the board will have an agenda item discussing the firearm-related incidents and what it can do to address them.

“What other measurements can we take? And that is the next step to have a conversation about what is the next step that can be taken in order to make sure that we are on the forefront,” she said. “If it was as easy as implementing X and it would all be magically fixed, every school district in the entire country would do that.”

Miller says the district and board have heard from parents, community members and stakeholders about what those groups would like to see done. She says everything will be weighed to create a fix that will best serve the district.

The chairwoman says the board will definitely have an agenda item discussing these incidents and what the board can do to address them. She wants the community to come together to help fight this issue. It is not just a school issue--she says--it is also a community issue and a home issue. “Everyone needs to get involved,” she says.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

'Fraudulent intent' | City of Rock Hill seeks $20 million for abandoned Panthers project

ROCK HILL, S.C. — The city of Rock Hill filed a legal response Wednesday against David Tepper's GT Real Estate Holdings in response to the abandoned construction of the Carolina Panthers Training Facility and Headquarters project.At issue is a disagreeme...

ROCK HILL, S.C. — The city of Rock Hill filed a legal response Wednesday against David Tepper's GT Real Estate Holdings in response to the abandoned construction of the Carolina Panthers Training Facility and Headquarters project.

At issue is a disagreement between the city and GT Real Estate Holdings over the use of, and the issuance of, bonds to help fund the project. The city accuses GT Real Estate of not being transparent in releasing information and details of the project that would have helped fund the bond process.

According to the document, in January 2022, the city of Rock Hill was prepared to proceed with market bonds of at least $135 million, but the city claims GT Real Estate told it to not proceed with the bond offering. That same day, the city of Rock Hill said GT Real Estate told it the project would need to be called back in scope to only include the Panthers' facilities and not some other buildings on the complex including a new medical office building and hotels.

Back in March, Tepper's company halted construction at the site citing missed payments from financial partners, including their accusation the city failed to provide $225 million in bonds for roads, sidewalks, and other public infrastructure at the site.

In their legal response Wednesday, the city said they are seeking $20 million in financial damages. Also, they are asking a bankruptcy judge to award them a trial by jury. The city is asking for a declaratory judgment, which is a binding ruling from the court, outlying its relationship with the defendant -- in this case GT Real Estate Holdings -- and its rights within that relationship.

GT Real Estate submitted a plan to a bankruptcy court in August to pay back creditors. Under a reorganization plan submitted to the court, Tepper's other company, DT Sports Holding, would provide $82 million to their sister company, GT Real Estate, to make payments. The plan included paying construction contractors $60.5 million and York County $21.165 million.

In June, York County sued to accuse Tepper's company of misusing $21 million of public funding provided for the project. Since GT Real Estate filed for bankruptcy, this limited the options available to the city of Rock Hill in terms of what remedies it could pursue.

Before a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Panthers owner David Tepper says the team will have a new indoor practice facility before the start of the 2019 season. Tepper refused to say where it would be located. The team currently has a bubble near Bank of America Stadium.

The Post and Courier in Charleston reports the Panthers were considering an 80-acre plot of land off I-77 where the Charlotte Knights used to play. The report says the facility could be modeled after the Dallas Cowboys' headquarters, complete with retail, restaurants and corporate offices.

Steve Harper, chairman of the Lancaster County Council, tells WCNC Charlotte they came in second behind York County. Gov. Henry McMaster mentioned extending light rail service into Rock Hill and other capital improvements to entice Tepper to move across the state line.

Former head coach Ron Rivera leads a team delegation to meet state lawmakers. The purpose of the visit was to encourage a bill that would give David Tepper tax breaks and incentives to relocate to York County. The State Department of Commerce estimated the new facility would generate $188 million over 15 years for the state.

Lawmakers in South Carolina pushed a potential vote on a bill that would give Tepper $115 million in tax breaks to the last day of the legislative session. In a statement, Tepper said it would "cost us a lot of money" to move into South Carolina, saying "we would like to be there." Tepper said if the deal wasn't approved, he'd be happy to keep the team's practice facility in Uptown Charlotte.

Mark Hart, vice president and chief operations officer for the Panthers, says the team hopes to break ground on its state-of-the-art facility in April 2020. He says David Tepper envisions the facility to be modeled after the Dallas Cowboys complex known as "The Star," in Frisco, Texas.

Tepper addresses future of the Panthers, including a new stadium

David Teppers tells reporters he wants a new stadium within 10 years. Speculuation begins about its location, including a plot of land in Uptown near Bank of America Stadium. Tepper says he'd want funding from the city and Mecklenburg County on the building of a new stadium.

The York County Council passes the first reading of two ordinances that will give the panthers tax incentives to move into South Carolina. Officials said the Panthers relocating would bring more than $3.7 billion in revenue and more than 5,000 jobs to the state.

During a media appearance in Rock Hill, Panthers owner David Tepper discusses the possiblity of a new stadium and makes it clear he will use public funding. Tepper also makes it clear a new stadium will not be a dome following the COVID-19 pandemic. It's unclear how much public money Tepper would want, but he says "the community's going to have to want it."

Rock Hill fails to issue $225 million in bonds for Panthers HQ project

Council records show Rock Hill leaders approved issuing up to $290 million in bonds for the project. City Attorney Paul Dillingham said the goal was to have the bonds issued by the end of February 2022. It didn't happen, and the Panthers paused construction. Tepper Sports & Entertainment says David Tepper has invested $170 million in the project so far.

Rock Hill business owners tell WCNC Charlotte they're worried about the future of the project, which played a role in many businesses choosing Rock Hill to begin with. Contractors hired to work on the facility are concerned by the uncertainty, with workers waiting for the go-ahead to resume construction.

Rock Hill leaders vote to follow York County's new funding plan, which would require the Panthers to pay for the new facility up front before collecting tax incentives to recoup costs. Tepper Sports and Entertainment remains silent on the issue and refuses to comment despite multiple requests.

Panthers owner David Tepper hasn't responded to new offer, SC leaders say

SC state representative condemns Carolina Panthers owner for pausing facility construction in Rock Hill

Panthers announce they are terminating Rock Hill project agreements

The uncertainty concerning the Carolina Panthers Training Facility and Headquarters project in Rock Hill, South Carolina, got a bit clearer Tuesday when Panthers' owner David Tepper's GT Real Estate Holdings told WCNC Charlotte they would be terminating the agreement surrounding the project.

During his first news conference since December of 2020, David Tepper says he will "respect" the city of Rock Hill's request to not have a public back and forth over the training facility and says he stands by his previous statement. Tepper says he's willing to sit back down with city leaders to discuss the project.

Public records reveal state leaders were blindsided by Tepper's decision

Department of Commerce emails and text messages show state leaders were blindsided by the Panthers' decision to terminate the agreement for the Rock Hill training facility. The decision was made one day before state and local offiicals were scheduled to tour the site.

Panthers Rock Hill facility officially dead as GT Real Estate files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

The effort to bring a Carolina Panthers training facility to Rock Hill has officially ended, a spokesperson with GT Real Estate has confirmed to WCNC Charlotte. It comes as GT Real Estate announced it's begun a court-led financial restructuring process, following the termination of the agreements with the City of Rock Hill.

Small business owners react to canceled Panthers project in Rock Hill

Loan approved between 2 Tepper companies to fund bankruptcy for failed project

Future of Rock Hill Panthers site uncertain as team prepares for training camp in Spartanburg

The company said it plans to offer $82 million to the York County government and to contractors involved in the failed Panthers headquarters project. Additionally, GT Real Estate plans to offer at least $20 million from the sale of the land where the HQ would have been on.

City of Rock Hill seeks $20 million for abandoned Panthers project

The new document filed Wednesday by the city outlines an over-three-year back-and-forth between themselves, GT Real Estate, York County and other municipal partners in how bonds could or could not be used to finance different parts of the project.

The filing alleges the city of Rock Hill continually informed GT Real Estate there were structural issues with the city's bonds, which were predicated upon assumptions regarding the taxable value of the finished facility and the percentage of future tax revenue that other players, for example, York County, were willing to plow back into the venture. In summary, the amount of bonds the city could provide is proportional to the amount of private investment provided by GT Real Estate.

"The city repeatedly communicated to [GT Real Estate] that the marketability of the bonds would be materially improved if [GT Real Estate] would provide additional, specific development details regarding the private investment in the Project and identify the master developer for the Project, but [GT Real Estate] repeatedly failed to do so," the document states.

The city also alleges GT Real Estate failed to provide sufficient detail regarding the use of the bond money to satisfy IRS requirements so the bonds could be 100% tax exempt. The document claims GT Real Estate suggested: "maybe the simplest thing to do is make 10-15% of the bonds taxable."

"[GT Real Estate] was advised on more than one occasion that the marketability of the bonds would be severely hampered if the bonds could not be issued on federal tax-exempt basis," the document reads.

Rock Hill points to this disagreement as to why the project was so delayed. The city goes as far as to accuse GT Real Estate of fraud, saying "the circumstances surrounding [GT Real Estate's] breach as described herein demonstrate that [GT Real Estate had fraudulent intent."

The document filed Wednesday is an "Adversary Proceeding," which carries the same meaning as a lawsuit in other courts, according to the United States Bankruptcy Court.

"The city has not ... given public statements about this because it is a legal matter," Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys said Wednesday. "Facts are stubborn things."

Thursday, Tepper's lawyers responded to the complaint filed by the city of Rock Hill saying the city's complaint is full of "false and incendiary allegations" and are "utterly meritless," saying Rock Hill promised to issue bonds but never did.

GT Real Estate previously said they plan to sell the site, and partially constructed building, to pay the city of Rock Hill at least $20 million from the available net proceeds after handling clean-up and senior claims.

Here’s how Fort Mill, Rock Hill, Clover and other schools stack up in latest SC testing

The results are in, and they show a wide range of academic ability levels for students across the region.The South Carolina Department of Education released 2021-22 results for major standardized tests in science, math and language arts. The SCPASS covers science in fourth and sixth grades. SC Ready covers language arts and math in grades 3-8.“Today’s results confirm the impacts and disruptions caused by the pandemic and the fact that we must continue to support students and educators as we recover,” state sup...

The results are in, and they show a wide range of academic ability levels for students across the region.

The South Carolina Department of Education released 2021-22 results for major standardized tests in science, math and language arts. The SCPASS covers science in fourth and sixth grades. SC Ready covers language arts and math in grades 3-8.

“Today’s results confirm the impacts and disruptions caused by the pandemic and the fact that we must continue to support students and educators as we recover,” state superintendent of education Molly Spearman said in a release.

Spearman said regression in areas like math is alarming, but language arts scores are encouraging.

“The return to pre-pandemic scores in ELA is due, in large part, to the sense of urgency educators felt and the willingness of educators and lawmakers to act and implement support during and post pandemic,” Spearman said.

Results fell into one of several categories.

Test scores either exceed, meet, approach or fail to meet expectations. Results varied considerably across the region. The Fort Mill School District largely shows gains related to past scores, and well outpaces statewide scores across grade levels and subject.

“We are very proud of the work being done by our teachers and staff in the district,” said Fort Mill District Superintendent Chuck Epps. “This data shows that the district is committed to the continued education of students regardless of the challenges we may face.”

The Clover School District received similar high marks. Others, like the Rock Hill School District, came in closer to state averages. A range of scores saw high and low marks for the York School District, Lancaster County School District and Chester School District.

Statewide, 26.8% of third-graders failed to meet math testing expectations. That figure grew steadily to eighth grade, where 40.8% of students fell below expectations.

Between 27.2% (fourth-graders) and 38.5% (eighth-graders) of York students failed to meet math expectations. Between 9.3% (seventh-graders) and 18.8% (fifth-graders) exceeded expectations.

Clover fared better. Between 11.4% and 21.3% of students by grade fell below expectations. In Fort Mill only 8%-12% of students, by grade, fell below expectations.

Rock Hill scores largely mirrored what the state registered. Rock Hill had 26.1% of third-graders, up to 49.8% of eighth-graders, who didn’t meet expectations.

Between 19.4% and 35.6% of Lancaster County students, by grade, didn’t meet math expectations. Between 32.2% (fourth-graders) and 62.9% (eighth-graders) in Chester County failed to meet expectations.

Then, there were students who excelled. Statewide, between 15.5% and 24.4% of students by grade exceeded math expectations.

More than 35% of all Fort Mill students exceeded math expectations. They ranged from 35.5% in seventh grade to 44.7% in third grade. Between 29.3% and 41% of Clover students exceeded expectations.

Rock Hill exceeded expectations between 7.5% and 23.6%, by grade. Between 16.3% and 36.1% of Lancaster County students exceeded math expectations. Chester County saw between 2.8% and 18.7% exceed expectations, with the number dropping with each school year.

English and language arts results show more than 22% of students statewide in grades 3-8 didn’t meet expectations. Scores range from 22.1% of fifth-graders in that category to 29% of third-graders.

In York, more than 31% of students in grades 3-5 didn’t meet expectations.

The highest figure came in third grade, at 38.5%. Grades 6-8 fared better, ranging from 22.5% in seventh grade to 27.7% in eighth grade. Only seventh-graders in York had a lower percentage of students who failed to meet expectations than the state figure.

In Clover just 8.9% of fifth-graders, up to 16.6% of third-graders didn’t meet expectations. Fort Mill was even better, ranging from 7% of fifth-graders to 11.1% of third-graders who didn’t meet expectations.

In Rock Hill, 22.7% of fifth-graders didn’t meet expectations. That number rose to 32.8% of eighth-graders. Only sixth-graders in Rock Hill scored better than the state number for students who failed to meet expectations.

Between 21.6% and 31.4% of Lancaster County students, by grade, didn’t meet ELA expectations. Between 27.9% and 37.5% of Chester County students didn’t meet expectations.

Other students tested on the opposite end of the spectrum. Statewide, between 16.7% and 30.6% of students by grade level exceeded expectations in ELA testing.

All Fort Mill and Clover grade levels had higher percentages of student exceeding standards than did the state. All Lancaster County grades except seventh grade did, too, as did grades three and four in Rock Hill.

The remaining grades, including all of them in York and Chester County schools, scored lower than the state figure of students exceeding standards.

Statewide, 31.1% of fourth-graders and 36.4% of sixth-graders didn’t meet expectations in science testing. York (28.7%; 33.6%), Clover (13.7%; 14.9%) and Fort Mill (11.5%; 13%) all performed better than the state as a whole.

Chester County schools fared worse with 43.2% of fourth-graders and 55.4% of sixth-graders failing to meet expectations.

Rock Hill (30%) and Lancaster County (26.7%) both bettered the state rate for fourth-graders, but weren’t as strong as the state number for sixth-graders. In both districts, 38.1% of sixth-graders failed to meet expectations.

On the opposite end 22.2% of fourth-graders and 24.1% of sixth-graders statewide exceeded expectations. Fort Mill (39.6%; 51%) and Clover (36.1%; 46.1%) exceeded the state figures.

Lancaster County fourth-graders beat the state mark with 23.6% exceeding expectations, but the 22% of sixth-graders fell below the state standard.

Rock Hill (21.2%; 22.2%), York (19%; 18.8%) and Chester (8.2%; 12.7%) fell below the state line for students exceeding standards in both grades.

The state information further breaks down by school level. It even includes some results by demographics. Parents can access those results by visiting ed.sc.gov. Just click the “Data & Reports” tab, then the “Test Scores” link. Click on SC READY for math and language arts results, or SCPASS for science results.

This story was originally published September 6, 2022 4:44 PM.

Clover football erases double-digit deficit in fourth consecutive rivalry win over York

Clover running back Demarco Evans scored a game-winning 13-yard touchdown with 6:54 left in the game as the Blue Eagles overcame an early 14 point deficit to beat the rival York Cougars, 28-24, on Friday night.This was the 109th meeting between the two schools in one of the longest-standing high school rivalries in the country.The win marks Clover’s fourth consecutive victory in the rivalry series, which dates back to 1912.“It feels great, man,” Clover head coach Brian Lane said. “Our ninth grade ...

Clover running back Demarco Evans scored a game-winning 13-yard touchdown with 6:54 left in the game as the Blue Eagles overcame an early 14 point deficit to beat the rival York Cougars, 28-24, on Friday night.

This was the 109th meeting between the two schools in one of the longest-standing high school rivalries in the country.

The win marks Clover’s fourth consecutive victory in the rivalry series, which dates back to 1912.

“It feels great, man,” Clover head coach Brian Lane said. “Our ninth grade won. Our JV won. We won. With rivals, you want to beat them all the way through the ranks, and that’s what our guys did.”

Heading into the game, Lane lauded his defense for its ability to slow down opposing offenses, and he got another special performance from the defensive unit Friday.

After being down 24-14 at halftime, the Clover defense pitched a second-half shutout against York, giving the Blue Eagles the opportunity to get back in the game.

“Our kids fought back,” Lane said. “That’s what I’m so proud of. We’ve been in every game we play. And now, our guys are learning to overcome those things and win in the fourth quarter, so I’m very proud of my group.”

York dominated the first half, coming down with two interceptions and forcing two turnovers on downs. However, York was unable to keep that momentum going in the second half.

A fumble in the fourth quarter led to Evans’ game-winning score, and they had two drives end in a turnovers on downs, including their final one with fewer than three minutes to play in the game.

“We didn’t play 48 minutes,” York head coach Dean Boyd said. “We played about 36 to 37. And you got to play the whole time. You got to give them (Clover) credit. They came out in the second half, and they had to stop us and had to score. And they did that, so give them props.”

Clover may have entered the game at 0-2, but Boyd knew that the Blue Eagles were much better than their record. He knew coming into the game that Clover was going to be a challenge, and that York had to be on their game to see out a victory.

“They’re a good football team,” he said. “I know their record was 0-2 coming in, but that is not indicative of the type of team that they are. We just got to back to the drawing board and correct some mistakes and do some things a little bit differently. Coaches. Players. Everybody.”

Clover quarterback Jaylon Hoover played a huge part in the Blue Eagles’ comeback, bouncing back from those two first-half interceptions and totaling more than 200 yards of total offense.

“We were just trying to do too much,” Hoover said. “We got caught trying to do more than we needed. Then heading into the second half, in the locker room, we noticed we were only down 10. And we noticed that if we just go out there and keep playing and keep fighting and doing the little things, everything will lead up to a big thing.”

The Blue Eagles move on to face Dorman at home next Friday.

York (2-1) suffered its first loss of the season and will look to bounce back in another home game next Friday against Rock Hill.

Both games kick off at 7:30 p.m.

This story was originally published September 9, 2022 11:50 PM.

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