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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Seabrook Island, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Seabrook Island:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Which SC beach is the safest with the least pollution? The most unsafe? Take a look

Last year, Environment America, a federation of environmental advocacy organizations, ranked the most unsafe beaches in the country based on tests run in 2020.That year, a total of 23 beaches were tested for fecal indicator bacteria in the state of South Carolina.Out of four tested counties in South Carolina, t...

Last year, Environment America, a federation of environmental advocacy organizations, ranked the most unsafe beaches in the country based on tests run in 2020.

That year, a total of 23 beaches were tested for fecal indicator bacteria in the state of South Carolina.

Out of four tested counties in South Carolina, the average percentage of potentially unsafe days in South Carolina by county in 2020 ranked Beaufort County as the second safest.

The four South Carolina counties that were tested were Horry, Charleston, Beaufort and Georgetown counties.

The scoring left Beaufort County with a 12% average number of days with potentially unsafe water for beaches in the county.

Comparatively, Horry County, which contains Myrtle Beach, scored a 34% average for potentially unsafe water for beach days.

Not a title to brag about, South Carolina’s own Myrtle Beach scored number one in the state for the most potentially unsafe swimming days in 2020. The testing conducted in Myrtle Beach resulted in potentially unsafe water 84% of the days tested. This average was a result of 70 potentially unsafe days out of 82 testing days.

Contrarily, North Myrtle Beach scored considerably better than its slightly southern counterpart, coming in at 34%, indicating 29 potentially unsafe days out of 87 testing days.

“While we were not able to pinpoint pollution sources for any particular beach, sewage overflows, stormwater runoff, and manure from factory farms, all contain fecal bacteria,” said John Rumpler, the clean water program director at Environment America.

Hilton Head Island tied for the safest number of days along with Isle of Palms and Seabrook Island, both in Charleston County, with a 20% indicator of potentially unsafe days. This comes from two potentially unsafe days out of 10 testing days.

This comes as no surprise as in 2019, Environment America ranked Beaufort County as a clean beach area yet again. In the study, 28 beaches in Beaufort County were tested, and only seven of those had even one “potentially unsafe” day, the report said.

Each beach in the county was tested for 10 or 11 days. Four of the seven beaches were on Hilton Head Island; two were on Harbor Island; one was on Hunting Island, according to a previous Island Packet report.

As for the 2020 report released last year, Myrtle Beach’s reported 84% of potentially unsafe days was one of the biggest percentages in the study, but not the highest overall in the U.S.

Cole Park in Nueces County, Texas scored a 91% average of potentially unsafe days, being broken down by 62 potentially unsafe days in 2020 out of 68 testing days.

Nye Beach in Lincoln County, Oregon scored a 90% average with nine potentially unsafe days out of 10 different testing days.

This story was originally published September 2, 2022 5:00 AM.

Seabrook Island neighbors push for short-term rental cap, mayor says no cap needed

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,&...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.

Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.

“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,” Flerlage said, “and then, determine whether or not we should lower the number of short-term rentals.”

As of June 19, there are 484 of these properties on the island, which residents said has led to overcrowding on the island’s streets and amenities.

Mayor John Gregg said for this year, data gathered over the past few months suggest otherwise.

“We’re not going to be looking at imposing limitations on the number of short-term rental units,” Gregg said.

Coastal Getaways owner Nancy Buck said more people are starting to call the island home, and good rentals are full for around 40% of the year.

She says all of her clients are property owners who rent to help offset the costs of the amenities, taxes and insurance.

“We’ve also gone from 35% permanent residents to 60% residents in the last two years,” Buck said. “Twenty-five percent of the properties have turned over since 2019.”

Buck also adds the majority of the amenities are mostly used by members and not rental guests.

However, the homeowners want the town’s government to hear them out.

“I’d like him to reconsider,” Flerlage said. “I’d like him to look at the reality and listen to the people who are property owners here, the residents on the island. You know, 700 people is a big number.”

“Let’s wait and see how this year goes,” Buck said. “They instituted the short-term rental ordinance couple of years ago, or actually, last year, so let’s give it a full year to see how it goes.”

Both Buck and the homeowners said they want to work out their differences over the next several months to come up with a solution that works for everyone.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Commentary: Address growing pains on these 3 connected islands

Freshfields Village, a popular, well-designed mix of restaurants, shops and various necessities, anchors the traffic circle at the south end of Betsy Kerrison Parkway where Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands come together.Before the pandemic, Freshfields was well-defined and relatively unencumbered. Now more development — a lot more —is coming.A new proposal seems to pop up every few weeks. There is increasing concern on all three islands about the pace, scope and effects of these developments, and whether anyone is...

Freshfields Village, a popular, well-designed mix of restaurants, shops and various necessities, anchors the traffic circle at the south end of Betsy Kerrison Parkway where Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands come together.

Before the pandemic, Freshfields was well-defined and relatively unencumbered. Now more development — a lot more —is coming.

A new proposal seems to pop up every few weeks. There is increasing concern on all three islands about the pace, scope and effects of these developments, and whether anyone is minding the store.

Who is looking out for what is in the best interests of the affected communities?

Most would agree that the senior living facility under construction and the emergency medical facility that signs tell us is “coming soon” will be beneficial. And for many the proposed Harris Teeter will be a welcome addition as the year-round and seasonal populations on the islands have grown significantly.

But there may be less enthusiasm for the proposed self-storage building next to the Andell Inn or the private club envisioned for land between Bohicket Marina and Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

More proposals will follow.

Developments in the vicinity of Freshfields fall under one of three jurisdictions: Charleston County or the towns of Kiawah or Seabrook islands.

While those authorities focus on individual projects, it doesn’t appear anyone is looking at the big picture.

The adverse effects on our communities if any one of these projects is examined in isolation would most likely be modest and manageable.

But when evaluated together, the cumulative impacts could overwhelm our infrastructure, significantly harm the environment and be detrimental to our quality of life.

The risks are compounded because this low-lying area, interspersed with indispensable marshes, is particularly vulnerable to king tides and rising seas.

The towns should jointly conduct studies that evaluate these projects individually, but, more importantly, also take a holistic perspective that analyzes and describes the potential effects from the entirety of these developments now and for years to come.

These analyses must make some assumptions about the scope of those projects that are only in the early planning stage, but future projections are necessary to allow all affected communities to anticipate and plan accordingly.

The consequences of more frequent and intense flooding that the Lowcountry will continue to experience must also be taken into account. These studies should provide the appropriate authorities with detailed recommendations that, when implemented, would help ensure all development is in the best interests of our communities and minimizes adverse effects.

Traditionally, developers don’t pay the social and environmental costs of their endeavors.

That should change.

They should pay the costs for these important studies as well as for improvements to roads, upgrades to other infrastructure and measures to mitigate impacts imposed by their projects.

Total transparency is paramount from the moment there are hints that a new development is in the works, and it benefits everyone when those of us behind the gates advocate for our Johns Island neighbors.

We can sustain the health and vitality of our communities if we work together.

Richard Wildermann is a Seabrook Island resident.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

10 South Carolina Beaches You Should Visit This Summer

Breathtaking beaches may be found all along the beautiful South Carolina coast. Tourists shall try one of the secret beaches on seldom frequented barrier islands if they want to escape away to their own quiet stretch of heaven. These sandy sanctuaries may be found all along the state's coastline, from SC's southernmost point to North Myrtle Beach, and offer a peaceful location to wander down the beach, look for shells, or...

Breathtaking beaches may be found all along the beautiful South Carolina coast. Tourists shall try one of the secret beaches on seldom frequented barrier islands if they want to escape away to their own quiet stretch of heaven. These sandy sanctuaries may be found all along the state's coastline, from SC's southernmost point to North Myrtle Beach, and offer a peaceful location to wander down the beach, look for shells, or simply soak up the sun. Only accessible by boat, most of the mesmerizing islands have remained undeveloped, preserving the beach in its natural state. Here are the best 10 underrated South Carolina beaches.

Charleston's Barrier Islands

Charleston has evolved to become one of the most popular tourist destinations in the United States, garnering several honors from travel journals. The interesting history, enchanting charm, and tasty gastronomy are all appealing, but tourists can also extend their vacation by a few days to visit some of the greatest beaches in the South. Only 45 minutes to an hour from downtown, the splendid peninsula of Charleston is encircled by barrier islands. There are several beautiful beaches to visit in the area!

Bulls Island

Bulls Island is the biggest of four barrier islands in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, and it stands along with one of the most pristine stretches of shoreline on the east coast. The famous and unique Boneyard Beach, where the remnants of surf-battered trees are sprawled over the sand, is one of its seven miles of beaches. A ferry to the island is available for tourists, as well as a variety of guided excursions such as a Bulls Island sunrise tour, beach drop, kayak trip, and multiday adventure.

Capers Island

Travelers shall visit this state history preserve, located 15 miles (24km) north of Charleston at the southwestern edge of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, on a picturesque kayak or boat tour. Along with a beautiful beach, they will be able to see a variety of dazzling birds, including endangered brown pelicans and ruddy turnstones. On the island, 294 different kinds of migrating birds have been sighted. Capers Island, like Bulls Island, features a "Boneyard Beach" formed by years of erosion.

Daufuskie Island

The splendid Daufuskie Island, located directly over Calibogue Sound from Hilton Head Island, will make its visitors feel a million miles away from society. It's not uncommon to observe no one when walking along the bewitching white sand beaches. To get to Daufuskie, travelers have to take a boat or water taxi from Hilton Head to Freeport Marina's public pier, then hire a golf cart and drive all the way across the island to the beach. They should not miss out on seeing the astonishing remainder of this remote South Carolina sea island and its numerous wonderful historical monuments while they're there.

Morris Island

This amazing 840-acre deserted island is located at the mouth of Charleston Harbor, across Lighthouse Inlet from Folly Beach, and is known for its historic 19th-century lighthouse. The incredible 150-foot brick structure now remains in the ocean just offshore after years of degradation. The stunning beach, on the other hand, is as lovely as ever, and it's an awesome place to hunt for seashells, especially sand dollars. Morris Island may be visited on a boat or kayak excursion organized by local outfitters.

Folly Beach

Folly Beach, South Carolina, is renowned as the "Edge of America" and is one of Charleston's most beautiful, well-known, and famous beaches. The Washout is a notable surfing area on the island's awesome eastern edge. If tourists continue walking until they reach a cul-de-sac, they may stroll to an abandoned road with hurricane-damaged foundations covered in colorful graffiti. A rookery of pelicans may also be seen where the Atlantic Ocean meets the clear water of Folly River.

Seabrook Island

The magnificent Seabrook Island has been home to soldiers, pirates, and well-to-do Charleston families over the years. The Seabrook Island Club is now a private community with beach access and vacation rentals. The splendid beaches are exclusively available to members and visitors due to the island's setup. The bewitching untouched sand is unlike any other beach in South Carolina. Aside from the beaches, Seabrook Island's tourists may ride their bikes throughout the land. Marsh rabbits, sea turtles, whitetail deer, and alligators are just a few of the fauna worth seeing.

Isle of Palms

The unique Isle of Palms is a high-end destination. Although the beautiful beach is still available to the public, there are several places that are only accessible if visitors stay at a resort or rent a unit. Beach access is available at Isle of Palms County Park, along with expert seasonal lifeguards and a dedicated swimming area for children. An exciting playground and marvelous picnic areas are also available.

The Grand Strand

The astonishing "Grand Strand," which runs between the Little River and Georgetown on the northern coast of South Carolina, is the state's greatest stretch of beautiful beach. The Waccamaw tribe used to live here until Europeans arrived after the American Revolution. Every year, millions of people visit this area, particularly the impressive Myrtle Beach. Unlike several other regions of the state, the Grand Strand has public access to all of its marvelous beaches. Family-friendly attractions are well-known in the area.

Pawleys Island

The tranquil and magical area of Pawleys Island, one of the region's oldest resort areas, is the first stop on the tourist's route north on King's Highway. There are a few fancy golf clubs and resorts on the "mainland" side of town, but visitors cannot access the beach from there. However, if they cross a beautiful little inlet, they will be on the wonderful island itself. They can also visit Otis Beach, which is a popular public beach.

Some Seabrook Island residents call for cap on short-term rentals

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - An ongoing battle over short-term rentals is brewing on Seabrook Island, where homeowners say uncontrolled growth of properties is affecting their quality of life.Homeowners Ted Flerlage and Paul McLaughlin said although they do not want to end short-term rentals on the island, the effects of recent growth have prompted them to call for a cap on short-term rentals.“If you come here in July, around July Fourth, as a resident walking out boardwalk one, let’s say, to north beach, there&rs...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - An ongoing battle over short-term rentals is brewing on Seabrook Island, where homeowners say uncontrolled growth of properties is affecting their quality of life.

Homeowners Ted Flerlage and Paul McLaughlin said although they do not want to end short-term rentals on the island, the effects of recent growth have prompted them to call for a cap on short-term rentals.

“If you come here in July, around July Fourth, as a resident walking out boardwalk one, let’s say, to north beach, there’s no space, and that is a rental issue,” Flerlage, who has lived on the island since March 2020, said. “That is a noise issue. It is a parking issue because every spot on the limited parking area is taken.”

The two homeowners have spearheaded the Preserve Seabrook effort. A letter sent to residents as part of the effort says concerns “center on the uncontrolled growth of short-term rentals, especially on streets where there are many full-time and private residential properties.”

“We aim to retain a reasonable offering of properties that can be rented by guests who love to visit and vacation on our beautiful island, while ensuring Seabrook does not gradually morph into a resort community,” the letter states. “We believe adding a cap on the number of resort properties on Seabrook would protect the unique qualities of our island while allowing revenue generated through rental properties to continue to flow back to the town through state and county accommodation taxes that the renters pay.”

Over 300 residents have signed a petition to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island, according to McLaughlin.

The petition seeks a single question on the Nov. 2, 2021 ballot that asks if voters support:

“Seabrook, when I bought here in 2002 and built our house here in 2009, it was more like ‘Cheers,’” McLaughlin said. “Everybody knew your name. Now, with the influx of 500 rental properties and growing, it’s changed a lot, and the quality of life on the island has changed a lot.”

Seabrook Island Mayor John Gregg said a petition from those calling for a cap has been sent to a committee, which will conduct a factual inquiry and then report to town council with recommendations.

“The object for the ad hoc committee was to identify inquiries of factual matters that could inform council as it considers whether or not it is warranted to do further regulation,” Gregg said.

The mayor added that to operate a short-term rental on the island, homeowners need to have a business license and a permit from the town.

McLaughlin and Flerlage said they welcome the data-driven effort but want more communication from the town and to work with them on a solution.

“Our question to them: What is the tipping point? If 500 isn’t the tipping point, is it 600? Is it 700? Is it 800? So, in the meantime, we need to figure it out,” McLaughlin said. “We need to halt what’s going on. Everybody keeps what they currently have, and we study the problem, and we figure out what the solution would be. We don’t make the problem worse while continuing to study it.”

“These are people who live in South Carolina and vote in South Carolina who live on the island and vote on the island,” Flerlage said. “These are the people who are their direct constituents – the people who vote for the mayor and the town council. It’s more than 300 of those people who signed up, which is nearly as many as who voted for them in the last election on Nov. 2, and in our opinion, there has been no communication and we’ve been getting fairly short-tripped on the issue.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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