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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Seabrook Island, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Seabrook Island:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Editorial: We dodged a bullet on Seabrook. Make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council’s agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County’s urban growth boundary.But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seab...

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council’s agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County’s urban growth boundary.

But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seabrook islands and Charleston County Council, should not get complacent. Instead, they need to work together on better planning to guide development in and around where those two sea islands meet up with southern Johns Island.

It’s unclear when, or if, the developer’s annexation request might resurface. Even if it doesn’t, there undoubtedly will be other development plans that will expose the tensions between those living on rural Johns Island and those living beyond the gates at Kiawah and Seabrook. This moment offers an important reset, one that should begin with getting all these local governments to recommit to the vision of an urban growth boundary — a line past which suburban development would not be supported through zoning, infrastructure or other local policies.

Such a recommitment wouldn’t bind future councils any more than their respective comprehensive plans do, but it would send a unified message about their mutual commitment to respect the natural beauty and environmental sensitivity of the area.

It’s clear that development pressures at Kiawah’s and Seabrook’s doorstep are increasing. A fresh series of new developments, including a senior living facility and an emergency medical facility, is cropping up. Elected officials, neighborhood leaders and county planners need to come up with a mutually agreed-upon zoning overlay for the area, one that would guide future development to ensure new uses and the size and scale of new buildings are appropriate. Such an overlay also would prevent developers from trying to play one jurisdiction against another to get the permits they seek, a tactic sometimes used in other parts of the tri-county area.

The mutual interests of everyone became clear during this recent annexation controversy, as the mayor of Kiawah Island took the unusual step of sending a letter to Seabrook’s mayor and council urging them to reject the annexation and respect the urban growth boundary, which Mayor John Labriola noted “serves as a guide to direct appropriate urban and suburban development while preserving and cherishing the rural charm of the Sea Islands that we all hold dear.”

Given what we’ve seen this summer, the existing urban growth boundary line may not continue to be enough on its own, and we believe a joint planning effort could help pin down the following: to what extent commercial development in the greater Freshfields area should be allowed to inch its way north on Betsy Kerrison; whether the towns should annex any more of Johns Island; whether any upzoning in the area might be appropriate; and how new building would affect the net traffic and drainage needs around Kiawah and Seabrook. While residents live only on Kiawah or Seabrook or in the unincorporated area, they have a stake in the answers to all those questions. This area deserves a new zoning overlay and conservation goals that offer a shared vision of how the southern part of Johns Island will — and will not — change.

Regional planning needs to take place on a large scale — such as our greater metro area from Seabrook to Awendaw to Summerville and Moncks Corner — but it’s also necessary on a smaller scale, especially in those places such as southern Johns Island where multiple local governmental jurisdictions meet.

Decades ago, the city of Charleston and Charleston County came up with the urban growth boundary across Johns Island and other areas where the suburbs ended to ensure their zoning and other policies worked together to protect rural areas that residents wanted to remain rural. Kiawah and Seabrook were once seen as too distant to bring into the conversation about that line. That’s not the case any more.

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The 4 Most Snake-Infested Rivers in South Carolina

South Carolina is known for its barbecue, warm temperatures, and welcoming beaches. But did you know that it’s home to plenty of different species of snakes? The hot, humid climate, combined with the marshy, wet areas and grasslands that make up the Low Country, make an excellent home for serpents. The Piedmont, the hilly region at the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains, also contains plenty of snakes. ...

South Carolina is known for its barbecue, warm temperatures, and welcoming beaches. But did you know that it’s home to plenty of different species of snakes? The hot, humid climate, combined with the marshy, wet areas and grasslands that make up the Low Country, make an excellent home for serpents. The Piedmont, the hilly region at the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains, also contains plenty of snakes. South Carolina has 38 different species of snakes, and they’re all native to the state! Let’s take a look at which rivers are home to the most snakes.

1. The Savannah River

The Savannah River is home to plenty of different species of snake. One dangerous serpent you might find here is the Copperhead. This species is the most venomous snake in the state. You can tell the Copperhead apart from others by its brown hourglass crossbands and over a pinkish or tan-colored background. These snakes enjoy the mountains as well as coastal hardwood floors.

They tend to live in grasslands, rolling pine hills, sandy coasts, and longleaf pine flatwoods. This means you might come across one at any point. The Savannah River, which borders Georgia, is home to these snakes and rat snakes. The black rat snakes have a telltale hint of white along their scales and are found in the mountains and Piedmont regions of central Georgia and South Carolina. You can find yellow rat snakes along the coast, and gray rat snakes tend to live in the Savannah River in Southern South Carolina.

2. The Pee Dee Rivers

The Little Pee Dee and Great Pee Dee rivers are home to the brown watersnakes. They’re various shades of brown with dark brown square blotches and a lighter belly. Though they tend to roam the Pee Dee rivers, you could come across one of these anywhere in the state. They enjoy life in flowing water, so rivers are their favorite spots. They’re very common snakes and are fantastic swimmers! Their bites are known to be especially painful, though they aren’t venomous.

3. The Edisto River

Another harmless snake you might come across is the Garter snake. They’re well-adapted to living around people and can often be found in city parks, as well as suburban lawns and gardens. While it’s rare for them to bite, they will defecate and release a foul smell to defend themselves!

The Edisto River makes its way through a large part of the Lowcountry in South Carolina. Much of it is wet and marshy, making it a great home for serpents. Cottonmouths can also be found in palmetto thickets, pine forests, dune areas, and prairies, as well as slow-moving streams, swamps, marshes, ponds, and rivers. This snake is incredibly dangerous and venomous. They vibrate their tails and expose the white interior of their mouths when they hiss.

4. The Broad River

Besides brown watersnakes, you will likely come across banded and northern watersnakes in the Broad River. You might also see Queen snakes, commonly confused with watersnakes due to similar coloration. Unlike watersnakes, though, these won’t typically bite you! Though banded watersnakes aren’t venomous, they give off an awful stench when threatened. Northern watersnakes make up the majority of these species found here and are often confused with copperheads due to the dark brown or reddish bands and blotches on their backs.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © Michiel de Wit/Shutterstock.com

The Reasons and Meaning Behind the Euphrates River Drying Up: 2023 Edition
Discover the 9 Most Snake-Infested Rivers In The United States

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I'm a 36-year-old mother of 2 and military wife. I have 2 dogs and a cat that I'm thoroughly obsessed with. When I'm not writing for work, I'm writing as a hobby. You can find me knee deep in a pile of books or way too invested in a video game.

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10 Scenic Beaches Near Charleston For A Sunny Escape

There are plenty of good reasons to make the trip to Charleston, South Carolina: Historic homes make for colorful photo ops, the restaurant scene is fresh and inventive, and locally owned stores and boutiques make for unparalleled shopping. Some of the Holy City's greatest assets, though, aren't actually within the city limits. Pack the sunscr...

There are plenty of good reasons to make the trip to Charleston, South Carolina: Historic homes make for colorful photo ops, the restaurant scene is fresh and inventive, and locally owned stores and boutiques make for unparalleled shopping. Some of the Holy City's greatest assets, though, aren't actually within the city limits. Pack the sunscreen and load the car because the scenic beaches near Charleston are a gem. You won't find ultra-crowded beaches, just a quiet spot to relax and soak up the sunshine. The smooth sand, cool water, and near-perfect weather will make you think you've found pure bliss. Here, find our guide to the sun-drenched beaches that are just a quick drive from the Charleston Peninsula. They're worth the detour.

1. Kiawah Island

While the 23-mile drive from the peninsula out to Kiawah Island takes about 40 minutes on a good day, the pristine stretch of sand at Kiawah's public Beachwalker Park is well worth it. It's quiet, especially for a public park, fronts the ocean, and also offers views of the Kiawah River. Beach chair and umbrella rentals are available seasonally, and dogs are welcome, as long as they're on a leash. Explore Kiawah Island's private beaches by renting a house or villa on the island or booking a stay at the Sanctuary, the island's luxurious oceanfront hotel.

2. Folly Beach

Just 12 miles from downtown, the "Edge of America" is the grooviest of Charleston's nearby beaches. It's a popular hangout for surfers, who frequent "The Washout," a stretch of coast known for having the area's best waves. Center Street, the bohemian beach town's colorful main thoroughfare, is lined with surf and souvenir shops and good eats, like Taco Boy and Rita's Seaside Grille, and is just steps away from Folly's 1,045-foot fishing pier.

3. Isle of Palms

The oceanfront county park on this barrier island has picnic tables, a sand volleyball court, and a playground for the littlest beach bums, making it a great place to take the whole family. Venture a little farther down the beach, beyond the park, to discover a number of fun beachfront bars and eateries, like family-friendly Coconut Joe's Beach Grill and The Windjammer, a classic dive bar and music venue that's as salty as they come. Paddle the intercoastal waterway from Isle of Palms where you may encounter dolphins and get up close to coves and marshes.

4. Seabrook Island

Though the island's nearly 4 miles of unspoiled beaches are private to residents and rental guests only (book your stay here), Seabrook is still worth a stop if you're already making the trip out to Kiawah's Beachwalker Park, which is just a few miles away. An Audubon International Cooperative Sanctuary, Seabrook is home to a variety of wildlife, including foxes, bobcats, deer, sea turtles, and bottlenose dolphins. Head to Bohicket Marina for a sunset stroll by the river, then plop down at an outdoor table at the Salty Dog Cafe for water views, East Coast peel-and-eat shrimp, and a cold beer or two.

5. Sullivan's Island

When it comes to old-school cottages, small town charm, and a spotless beach to boot, you won't find a dreamier destination than Sullivan's Island. While neighboring Isle of Palms has a lively resort feel, 3.3-square-mile Sullivan's tends to fly under the radar–and the locals like it that way. Be sure to stop by Poe's Tavern on Middle Street for a killer burger before you head back toward town. Flip-flops and salty hair are always welcome on the front porch.

6. Bulls Island

Accessible only by ferry, this barrier island is 45 minutes away from downtown Charleston and feels far away from the comforts of civilization. A good way to see the birds of this untouched island, and perhaps a playful dolphin if you're lucky, is on a guided paddling tour. Comb the beach for shells, walk Boneyard Beach where a forest is being recalled by the sea, or track foxes, bobcat, and deer.

7. Edisto Island

About 60 miles from Charleston, Edisto Beach's unspoiled coastline makes it worth the drive. Stay beachside for a dreamy vacation, or take a day trip from Charleston. One of four oceanfront state parks in South Carolina, palmetto-lined Edisto Beach State Park provides the picture-perfect backdrop for swimming, hunting for shells and sharks' teeth, fishing, or strolling. After a day on the island's trails, savor some seafood at the Waterfront Restaurant or the tacos at McConkey's Jungle Shack.

8. Morris Island

Hunt for shells and fossils near the candy cane–striped lighthouse on this uninhabited island just minutes from Charleston. Accessible only by boat, visitors can opt for several tour options, including riding out on a 55-foot power catamaran that's for the more adventurous traveler. For photography buffs, view the lighthouse from the shores of Folly Beach.

9. Pawleys Island

It takes a bit longer to reach from Charleston than some of the other beaches, but the slower pace on Pawleys Island is instantly soothing. This barrier island packs a lot into its four-mile stretch. Set off in a canoe or kayak to explore the salt marsh that separates this island from the mainland, or settle in for a day at the beach. There's shelling, fishing, and crabbing to be done. Sign up for surfing lessons—some of the best waves are near Pawleys Island Pier.

10. Capers Island

Similar to Bulls Island, Capers Island has its own forest of forgotten sea-bleached trees covering the shoreline. At low tide, you may see feeding dolphins and water birds like egrets and herons searching for a meal. Discover tide pools as you walk the beach, hike the island to see gators and deer in their natural habitat, or paddle along the shores and see jellyfish and crabs. Reach this undeveloped island by chartered boat, or take a kayak tour to learn about the area's ecosystem.

Frequently Asked Questions

Larger supermarket proposed to replace Harris Teeter between Kiawah and Seabrook islands

A longtime supermarket that serves shoppers of Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands could be relocated and enlarged under proposed plans.The existing 38,000-square-foot Harris Teeter Village Market grocery store could expand to nearly 54,000 square feet in a newly built store as part of a proposed retail development on a nearly 22-acre parcel behind the existing Freshfields Village Shopping Center.Property owner Riverstone Properties LLC of Richmond, Va., wants to rezone the undeveloped site on Kiawah Island Parkway from low-dens...

A longtime supermarket that serves shoppers of Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands could be relocated and enlarged under proposed plans.

The existing 38,000-square-foot Harris Teeter Village Market grocery store could expand to nearly 54,000 square feet in a newly built store as part of a proposed retail development on a nearly 22-acre parcel behind the existing Freshfields Village Shopping Center.

Property owner Riverstone Properties LLC of Richmond, Va., wants to rezone the undeveloped site on Kiawah Island Parkway from low-density residential use to a commercial planned development. The Charleston County Planning Commission recently deadlocked 4-4 on changing the land use and the effort failed.

County spokeswoman Kelsey Barlow said the commission only makes recommendations. The proposed change will now be considered by County Council’s Planning and Public Works Committee on March 16.

Real Estate

Representatives of Riverstone Properties, which is affiliated with the owner of Kiawah Island Golf Resort, and Harris Teeter did not respond to requests for comment on the plans.

Planning commission member Logan Davis said developers indicated at an earlier meeting one reason the supermarket chain wants to relocate to a larger store is so the grocer will have better entry and exit space for deliveries.

Some planning board members wanted a new traffic study while others were concerned about a lack of clarity for the proposed connection to Freshfields Village. The shopping center is owned by Columbia-based Edens, which paid nearly $125 million for the property in June.

One board member expressed concerns that the connection to Freshfields appeared to be near the entrance to a convenience store off Hedgerow Lane and he was worried about the connection across a planted median on Freshfields Drive. He preferred a different connection point.

The development would allow drive-thrus for a pharmacy but not fast food under the current proposal.

A decades-old Lowcountry truck terminal was idled this summer by a high-profile business failure, its owner running on fumes.

It’s poised to rev back to life.

The former Yellow Corp. depot between Rivers Avenue and Interstate 26 in North Charleston and two others in South Carolina are among the properties that onetime rivals of the fallen company and other opportunistic buyers snapped up at a U.S. Bankruptcy Court auction in Delaware.

The sales, totaling about $1.9 billion for about 75 percent of the roughly 180 freight yards and service centers that went on the block, were approved last week.

The other Palmetto State sites changing hands are in West Columbia and Piedmont, southwest of Greenville.

Yellow’s remaining real estate holdings are still in play, including a recently shuttered terminal in Florence.

The North Charleston depot had been in business since at least 1967, when it was run by a familiar name in the tractor-trailer business: Roadway Express.

Twenty years ago Nashville-based Yellow eased into the fast lane. It acquired Roadway for $1.05 billion in December 2003 and became the No. 3 player in the U.S. logistic industry’s “less-than-truckload” niche, which specializes in moving smaller loads for multiple customers within a single trailer.

Some two decades on, Yellow was broken down on the side of the road. The company filed for bankruptcy protection in August after years of financial struggles and $1.3 billion in debt, not including its unsecured liabilities.

The collapse marked the biggest-ever failure of a U.S. trucking business. It was more than noteworthy that just three years earlier Yellow had received $700 million in pandemic-era loans from the U.S. government to keep it afloat.

Rather than try to fix the financial wear and tear, the fallen 99-year-old trucking icon known for its cheap rates decided instead to shut down and sell its real estate, rigs and other assets to repay creditors.

MUSC Health breaks ground on Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

The more than 20,000 square foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The Sea Islands community is expected to undergo significant population growth over the next few years, especially those residents 65 and older. The Sea Islands are also geographically isolated, situated more than 20 miles from the nearest hospital. The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.“It can take up to 45 minutes to get to th...

The more than 20,000 square foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The Sea Islands community is expected to undergo significant population growth over the next few years, especially those residents 65 and older. The Sea Islands are also geographically isolated, situated more than 20 miles from the nearest hospital. The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.

“It can take up to 45 minutes to get to the nearest hospital from the Sea Islands. That’s too long for an emergency situation such as a stroke, where every minute counts. As the state’s only comprehensive academic health system, we are committed to delivering the best possible care, closest to home,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This new medical pavilion will provide rapid access to outstanding care for the entire Sea Islands community.”

As part of the MUSC Health system’s overarching strategy, the MUSC Health Charleston Division has worked to provide better community access and local care in the greater Tri-County region, as well as coastal communities to the north and south of Charleston. This enables better capacity at the flagship facilities, which offer specialized and complex care downtown while enhancing overall accessibility and continuity of care for patients and families, especially in underserved communities. Since 2019, four new multispecialty ambulatory care platforms have opened in West Ashley, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant.

In addition to 24/7 emergency care, the facility will offer two trauma rooms, a rooftop helicopter pad, and a medical office building that will provide primary and specialty care, including imaging and lab services, cardiology and physical therapy. A telemedicine network will connect the entire facility to some of the nation’s top providers at MUSC Health in downtown Charleston. The Town of Kiawah Island donated $1 million to create a healing, restful green space and garden adjacent to the new facility.

“Accessibility to the wonderful health system and hospitals we have here has been a concern, so it was exciting to hear about this project,” said Town of Kiawah Mayor John Labriola. “My hat’s off to the MUSC Board of Trustees and the institution’s leadership, because getting a certificate of need is not easy… personally, I look forward to the ribbon cutting and seeing our garden that will be named for the Town of Kiawah.”

The project was made possible in part by Kiawah Partners, which was acquired by South Street Partners in 2013, who donated 6 acres of land to the Medical University Hospital Authority (MUSC Health), valued at $4.85 million.

"This project was initiated to meet the huge need for medical services on Kiawah Island, Seabrook, and Johns Island. With no convenient emergency healthcare options currently available, we have been working for seven-plus years to figure out a way to bring accessible healthcare to the Sea Islands,” said Chris Randolph, South Street Partners. “Thanks to MUSC, we will soon have a world-class medical facility that provides so much more than what we had originally envisioned. We couldn’t be more pleased to have been able to donate the land for this project and feel very grateful to partner with such an excellent health care system.”

Of the estimated $30 million needed to fund the project, MUSC is committed to raising $17 million in private support. To date, it has received more than $9.5 million in confirmed gifts, with many coming from local residents.

“Private support is critical to the long-term success of the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion because of the many financial challenges that come with operating a medical facility in this community,” said Kate Azizi, vice president for Institutional Advancement. “One challenge is the low population density of the Sea Islands. While this is an aging population that needs timely access to medical care – there aren’t enough people living in these communities full time to sustain our operations. Philanthropic support helps fill those gaps, allowing us to deliver the best care possible where and when it’s needed.”

Donors Chris and DeeDee Gibson are giving $2 million to the project. In recognition of their generosity, the physical therapy space will be named in their honor. “My family has been coming to Kiawah for close to 40 years,” Chris Gibson said. “When my wife DeeDee and I built a home here, she had one request: that there was a hospital nearby in case of an emergency. All these years later, we are excited to contribute to the new MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion and to help make these vital medical services available to our neighbors on Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands.”

“The construction of a full-fledged medical facility with emergency services is a dream come true for all Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook Islands,” said local resident Pam Harrington, who donated $2 million and will name the emergency department after the Harrington family. “As our population continues to grow and more folks are retiring to our area, the demand for medical services grows with it! Being a Kiawah/Cassique resident for many years, the addition of a medical pavilion fills a real need that has existed over several decades. Prior to my 40-plus years in real estate on the islands I was a practicing ICU nurse. This medical center is near and dear to my heart! As a thank you and show of appreciation to all who have been so supportive of my success, here, on the Sea Islands, it seems befitting to take this opportunity to give back in a meaningful way.”

Construction is expected to conclude in late 2023.

Quote bank:

Seabrook Mayor John Gregg – “It is indeed my pleasure to welcome MUSC to Seabrook Island, as our local community will be well served by the capabilities of this facility and the practitioners who will staff it. We look forward to having better availability of care, ranging from emergency room treatment, to advanced diagnostics for the ailments, bumps, pains, scrapes, stings, and strains that come with having an active and diverse population.”

MUSC Board of Trustees Vice Chairman Charles Schulze – “On behalf of the board, I want to acknowledge, commend, and deeply, deeply thank you for your dedication hard work and the public private collaboration that is taking place to get us to where we are today. As an air force veteran of the Vietnam war, I know the importance and necessity of teamwork. When you have a complex mission ahead of you in those situations, your unity as a team is your biggest strength… And it didn't matter where you live, where you were from or what your background was in our military. You learned that persistence, perseverance, collaboration, and expertise are critical to the success of a mission. And it's been no different in this case. When the board began to discuss the feasibility of this project, we knew it wasn't going to happen without teamwork and vision. Not only from everybody at MUSC, but also from the community here in the sea islands.”

MUSC Health System CEO and Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Dr. Pat Cawley – “What makes this project challenging is that it doesn’t fit into normal health constructs. We spent a lot of time with the community, trying to gauge what was needed and it was clear that there was tremendous community support for this project and it was the engagement with the concept of neighbors caring for neighbors and the work of the community to reach out to state officials and regulators that helped make this project a reality. MUSC Health is proud to be a part of this community and its health care provider of choice, and we are humbled by the level of support we are receiving to bring this shared vision to reality.”

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About MUSC

Founded in 1824 in Charleston, MUSC is the state’s only comprehensive academic health system, with a unique mission to preserve and optimize human life in South Carolina through education, research and patient care. Each year, MUSC educates more than 3,000 students in six colleges – Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy – and trains more than 850 residents and fellows in its health system. MUSC brought in more than $327.6 million in research funds in fiscal year 2021, leading the state overall in research funding. MUSC also leads the state in federal and National Institutes of Health funding, with more than $220 million. For information on academic programs, visit web.musc.edu

As the health care system of the Medical University of South Carolina, MUSC Health is dedicated to delivering the highest quality and safest patient care while educating and training generations of outstanding health care providers and leaders to serve the people of South Carolina and beyond. Patient care is provided at 14 hospitals with approximately 2,500 beds and five additional hospital locations in development; more than 350 telehealth sites, with connectivity to patients’ homes; and nearly 750 care locations situated in all regions of South Carolina. In 2022, for the eighth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the No. 1 hospital in South Carolina. To learn more about clinical patient services, visit muschealth.org.

MUSC and its affiliates have collective annual budgets totaling $5.1 billion. The nearly 25,000 MUSC team members include world-class faculty, physicians, specialty providers, scientists, students, affiliates and care team members who deliver and support groundbreaking education, research, and patient care.

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