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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Seabrook Island, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Seabrook Island:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Why Southerners Vacation in the Same Spot Time After Time

My family spends every 4th of July at the beach. It's the same beach every year—the beach where I grew up vacationing, where my dad grew up spending weekends and summers, where his parents and his grandparents did before that. My family is spread out across the South now—in Georgia, Alabama, and Texas—but come the first week of July, we always gather in the same spot on Florida's Forgotten Coast, just as my dad's family always has.My family is not alone in having a holiday tradition locked to a specific location. Loa...

My family spends every 4th of July at the beach. It's the same beach every year—the beach where I grew up vacationing, where my dad grew up spending weekends and summers, where his parents and his grandparents did before that. My family is spread out across the South now—in Georgia, Alabama, and Texas—but come the first week of July, we always gather in the same spot on Florida's Forgotten Coast, just as my dad's family always has.

My family is not alone in having a holiday tradition locked to a specific location. Loads of families do, whether it's a rental you and your family return to year after year or a home that's been passed down through generations like mine. You see, in the South, we understand the importance of creating core memories associated with a place. We know that new adventures and destinations are fun and all, but there's also something nostalgic and comforting about coming to a home away from home—even on vacation.

In thinking about the why behind this, I started counting my friends who have family traditions and vacations of their own. Trips they take every year. The friends I know will always be away for a week at the end of August or have the same Memorial Day plans. I don't have to ask where they're going, and there's no point in extending an invitation someplace new. After years of friendship, I know what they'll be doing. Their holiday plans have and will always be set.

Every year, my friend Gavin Blue spends a week with her family at Figure 8 Island in North Carolina. They've been visiting from their home in McLean, Virginia, for the last 30 years—at first as a family reunion of sorts with her dad's side and now as an annual trip for her immediate family. "It's the one vacation a year that I truly try to 'unplug' and detach from reality for a week once I get past the gate house and over the drawbridge," she says. "I cannot imagine a summer without our Figure 8 week."

When asked what makes this beach week so special, Gavin tells me how the people, and the houses, and the traditions have changed over time, as their family has expanded and friends and boyfriends have tagged along. But she says, every year, the island is the same.

"Some of my cousins and aunt and uncles from my dad's side have gradually started coming again the same week we go and it's evolved into us renting homes across the street from one another," she adds. "We set up at the beach starting around 10 a.m. and don't typically head back to our homes until 6 p.m. or until high tide gets us, whichever comes first. Even though we are all adults now, we've still got family beach game tournaments and family dinners and cousin-only dinners throughout the week."

She says she can't wait to continue the tradition when she and her husband have children one day.

For my friend Laura Wilson, that place is Seabrook Island in South Carolina. Her family discovered the idyllic beach community in more recent years, but she says it's since become their go-to summer beach destination. They now spend a week there every summer, renting different houses year after year, each she describes as "so cute and so welcoming."

"We love the restaurants and shops at Seabrook, and will usually pepper in a shopping trip or dinner in Charleston, which isn't a far drive," she says. "One of my favorite activities is biking around the beautiful Seabrook roads in the early evening, watching the sunset through the Spanish moss-covered trees."

Last year, Laura's husband joined the trip for the first time. "Seabrook proved that as our family grows, it will continue to be a place we can all visit and make memories together," she explains. "The more the merrier!"

7 Things to Do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina

It’s high time you added this Lowcountry destination to your beach bucket list.Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier ...

It’s high time you added this Lowcountry destination to your beach bucket list.

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier island is a true escape. Here, nature reigns supreme: ten miles of beaches roll out along the Atlantic; cicadas form their own sort of soundtrack; and lights-out is often determined by the sea turtles' nesting season. Even so, there's plenty to do for travelers who like their time in nature punctuated with good food, luxurious creature comforts, and a frozen drink in hand. Here are seven things to do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

Stay Like a Local

For access to all of Kiawah's amenities, from bike rentals to pools, you'll have to stay on the island. For an experience that's luxurious but unpretentious, book a room at The Sanctuary, an oceanfront hotel known for its five-star service and elevated onsite dining. For families who want a little room to spread out (or a kitchen), villa and home rentals are a smart choice; reserve through the resort directly, or book through a site like VRBO or Airbnb.

Spend a Day on the Sand

On the west end of the island, Beachwalker Park is Kiawah's only public beach access feels like a hidden gem, thanks to its wide, unspoiled expanses of sand. It offers the best of both worlds too: in addition to the ocean frontage, you can also score views of the Kiawah River here.

Hit the Links

Five state-of-the-art golf courses are open to the public. For avid fans of the sport, the Ocean Course alone makes Kiawah worth the trip. Host to two PGA Championships, the 18-hole course is not for the faint of heart. Raised above the dunes to capitalize on the expansive shore views, golfers are also subjected to ocean breezes (which don't exactly make for an easy or predictable trip around the green). Try Cougar Point for marsh views and a slightly less technical experience.

Go for a Cruise

One of the best ways to explore the island is to leave the car in park and take a beach cruiser for a spin (you can reserve them through the resort or bring your own). Between 30 miles of paved trails and 10 miles of hard-packed beach, there's no shortage of routes to explore. Ask for directions to the Marsh View Tower, an observation deck primed for birdwatching and soaking in the marsh and river scenery.

Visit Heron Park Nature Center

The naturalists here will school you in many of the species who call the island home, from bobcats and white-tailed deer to loggerhead sea turtles and American alligators. Sign up for a guided tour, like "Back Island Birding", "Marsh Kayaking," or "Ocean Seining and Beach Combing," or ask for their recommendations for the best nature-spotting places in the area.

Explore Freshfields Village

Built around a lush lawn, Freshfields Village has plenty of restaurants and shops to explore, plus a boutique stay, the Andell Inn. Pick up a beach read at Indigo Books; snag treats for your four-legged friends at Dolitte's; and gear up for island adventures SeaCoast Sports and Outfitters. Start the morning with coffee and a breakfast sandwich from Java Java; settle in for grilled cheese and a milkshake at retro Vincent's Drugstore & Soda Fountain; or cap off the day with house-made frosé from newly opened The Co-Op. Check their calendar for seasonal events, like summertime's "Music on the Green" concert series and farmer's market.

Venture to Bohicket Marina & Market

Make the short drive to neighboring Seabrook Island for a taste of the area's salty maritime culture. Snag a umbrella-shaded table on the upper deck at Salty Dog Café for fresh catch, a cold beer, and riverfront views of the boats coming and going from the marina.

Jordan Promoted to Head Women’s Golf Coach

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – University of Memphis Vice President and Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Laird Veatch announced the promotion of Jennifer Jordan to head women's golf coach on Friday.Jordan has been with the program for the past four seasons, serving as the assistant coach the past three after b...

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – University of Memphis Vice President and Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Laird Veatch announced the promotion of Jennifer Jordan to head women's golf coach on Friday.

Jordan has been with the program for the past four seasons, serving as the assistant coach the past three after beginning as a volunteer assistant in 2018.

"We are delighted to promote Jennifer to head coach of our women's golf program," Veatch remarked. "Jennifer has been a tremendous asset for the team the past four seasons as an assistant. She's done a great job of supporting our student-athletes since joining the program and we are very optimistic about the future under her direction."

In 2021-22, the Tigers placed in the top-10 in six of the team's 10 tournaments, including a runner-up finish at the Brickyard Collegiate. Memphis finished the season with a sixth-place showing at the AAC Championship, with three players earning top-20 finishes.

Jordan helped five Tigers earn at least two top-20 finishes each on the season, led by Victoria England, who had one top-five, one top-10 and four top-20's on the year. Rebecca Brink notched a pair of top-10 finishes to go with four top-20's.

"I am overwhelmed with excitement to lead this team going forward," Jordan said. "I want to thank Laird, Jeff Crane, and Lauren Ashman for their support and influence during this process. The amount of feedback I've received within this city has been truly humbling. With our returners and new signees this season, I would expect to see something special beginning this fall."

In her one season as a volunteer assistant in 2018-19, Jordan helped five golfers record top-10 finishes, including first place wins from Michaela Fletcher and Sydney Colwill, who won the Memphis Women's Intercollegiate and The Payne Stewart Memorial, respectively. Under Jordan's guidance, Fletcher ended her collegiate career in the final round of stroke play in her second NCAA Championships.

As a team, the Tigers finished in the top-five in six tournaments, including a first place draw in the Payne Stewart Memorial. Memphis finished the season with a third-place final in the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

Prior to her stint at Memphis, Jordan was the head coach for both the boys and girls teams at Crosstown High School in Memphis, Tenn. She also served as a golf instructor at courses around the area, facilitating clinics and other skills programs.

A golf instructor since 2006, Jordan has helped countless individuals improve their golfing abilities across the Southeast. She served as the Director of Golf Instruction and Lead Golf Instructor at Mirimichi Golf Course in Memphis, also handling merchandising for the club.

Jordan has also served as teaching pro at Seabrook Island Club (South Carolina), New Orleans Country Club (New Orleans) and Cottonwoods Golf Course (Robinsonville, Mississippi). As the owner of Jennifer Jordan Golf, she has also instructed at Colonial Country Club, Chickasaw Country Club, Vantage Point Golf Center and Marion Golf and Athletic Club in the Memphis area.

Before taking an instructing role, Jordan competed on the Duramed Futures Tour, the preliminary tour to the LPGA for multiple years.

A former Tiger golfer, Jordan played at Memphis from 1994-98. She earned second team All-Conference USA honors in 1996 when she finished 10th at the C-USA Championships (234). She is a former member of the LPGA Teaching and Club Professionals and lives in Memphis.

How to follow the Tigers: For complete information on Memphis Tigers Women's Golf, visit www.GoTigersGo.com and follow the team's social media channels on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Seabrook Island neighbors push for short-term rental cap, mayor says no cap needed

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,&...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.

Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.

“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,” Flerlage said, “and then, determine whether or not we should lower the number of short-term rentals.”

As of June 19, there are 484 of these properties on the island, which residents said has led to overcrowding on the island’s streets and amenities.

Mayor John Gregg said for this year, data gathered over the past few months suggest otherwise.

“We’re not going to be looking at imposing limitations on the number of short-term rental units,” Gregg said.

Coastal Getaways owner Nancy Buck said more people are starting to call the island home, and good rentals are full for around 40% of the year.

She says all of her clients are property owners who rent to help offset the costs of the amenities, taxes and insurance.

“We’ve also gone from 35% permanent residents to 60% residents in the last two years,” Buck said. “Twenty-five percent of the properties have turned over since 2019.”

Buck also adds the majority of the amenities are mostly used by members and not rental guests.

However, the homeowners want the town’s government to hear them out.

“I’d like him to reconsider,” Flerlage said. “I’d like him to look at the reality and listen to the people who are property owners here, the residents on the island. You know, 700 people is a big number.”

“Let’s wait and see how this year goes,” Buck said. “They instituted the short-term rental ordinance couple of years ago, or actually, last year, so let’s give it a full year to see how it goes.”

Both Buck and the homeowners said they want to work out their differences over the next several months to come up with a solution that works for everyone.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Can I set off fireworks where I live on July 4th?

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – We’re just days away from the Independence Day holiday, and if you’re thinking about skipping the big firework shows in our community, you may want to make sure setting them off in your own driveway is legal before heading to the firework stand.City of North Charleston – Setting off fireworks is legal year-round from 9:00 a.m. until 11:30 p.m., and on holidays like New Year’s Eve and the 4th of July, you can set them off until 1:00 a.m.C...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – We’re just days away from the Independence Day holiday, and if you’re thinking about skipping the big firework shows in our community, you may want to make sure setting them off in your own driveway is legal before heading to the firework stand.

City of North Charleston – Setting off fireworks is legal year-round from 9:00 a.m. until 11:30 p.m., and on holidays like New Year’s Eve and the 4th of July, you can set them off until 1:00 a.m.

City of Hanahan – setting off firecrackers is only legal five days of the year: Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, and July 4 from 10:00 a.m. until 10:59 p.m.

City of Goose Creek – You can only shoot fireworks in the city on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, and July 4.

Town of Mount Pleasant – You can set off fireworks the day before and the day after a holiday from 9:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. in Mount Pleasant.

Town of James Island – Fireworks are allowed between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. any day including the 4th of July, but that time runs later on New Year’s Eve.

Town of Summerville – People living in town limits can shoot fireworks any day between 10:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m., and on the 4th of July and New Year’s Eve between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m.

Town of Moncks Corner – Fireworks can be discharged on New Year’s Eve from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 a.m., and on July 4 from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.

Purchasing and setting off fireworks in the City of Charleston and on most of the islands is prohibited. This includes Folly Beach, the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Seabrook Island, West Ashley, and the peninsula. You can use sparklers.

Fireworks are allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. on the 4th of July in unincorporated Dorchester County. There are no laws set in unincorporated Charleston County.

If you are unsure, it’s always a safe idea to check with your local government or your Homeowners Association before setting off any fireworks.

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