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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Sullivan's Island, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Sullivan's Island:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

An interview with Cadet Col. Brandon Johnson, this year’s Regimental Commander

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.Q&...

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.

Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.

Q&A with Brandon Johnson

What is one word that you would use to describe yourself?

Fearless.

How do you spend your free time?

I always get a workout and a run in. My schedule is busy, but exercise is a daily priority. On the weekends, I enjoy spending time with friends and family. You can always catch me on the boat or the beach. I live right next to Sullivan’s Island, so I frequently spend time there.

What is a quote you live by?

There are two. The first is just two words — “Never settle.” I first started using this short phrase my sophomore year and it has stuck with me ever since. I also live by the Bible verse Isaiah 6:8: “And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?’ Then I said, ‘Here am I! Send me.’” Stepping up to a challenge is something I take pride in, and I am always looking for one.

Why did you choose The Citadel?

In high school, I planned on attending the University of South Carolina. I vividly remember sitting down at the dinner table and deciding that I was going to attend The Citadel. I changed my mind because I was seeking a lifestyle that was uncommon for most people my age. I knew the structure and discipline would benefit me. Thankfully I made the right decision, and I have not looked back since.

Who inspires you the most and why?

My father is a huge inspiration for me, his character and selflessness are something I truly admire. No matter what decision I make, he always supports me. I frequently call him to ask for advice and he always seems to have the right answer. Without my parents, I would be no where near where I am today. He has made countless sacrifices for me and my siblings. He always pushes me to be my best in any endeavor.

What made you want to become the Regimental Commander and what are your goals for the school year?

I love The Citadel and wanted to make a difference for my fellow cadets. I am fortunate to have great mentors who always push me to be my best here, and they are a big reason why I made it this far. At the beginning of the year, my main goals were to develop as many leaders as possible, give cadets the ability to lead and to create an environment that is both productive and enjoyable. I want everyone to take pride in their Citadel experience.

As a knob, did you ever see yourself becoming the Regimental Commander?

I was not dead set on becoming the Regimental Commander, however, I knew I could do it if I set my mind to it — I knew I had the potential. I learned early on that my effort was the only limiting factor to my success in life. I always wanted to be a commander at some level. At the end of the day, I wanted to be a leader.

You are the Regimental Commander the same year the Citadel celebrates 100 Years on the Ashley. How important and special is that to you?

It is very important to me. I have always had an astounding amount of respect for all of the classes that came before mine. The legacies they left behind are still carried throughout the Corp of Cadets. The Citadel truly is a special place and it is an honor to be carrying on the legacy of the campus. The cadets are what make the past 100 years so meaningful. Without the past, present and future cadets, The Citadel’s life-changing experience would disappear. I hope to see another 100 years of the road less traveled.

What is your plan after you graduate and what will you miss the most after you graduate?

I am going to begin my career right here in Charleston. Thankfully, I am fortunate to have professional experience in the maritime logistics industry through past internships. I have no doubt I will miss all the brothers and sisters I have gained along the way. I am beyond fortunate to be surrounded by peers who constantly push themselves. Being surrounded by the best 18-to-22-year-olds in the country is a humbling and rewarding experience.

What life lesson have you learned here that you will take with you after you graduate?

I have learned so much that it’s honestly hard to put it into words. I developed what I believe to be the most important and beneficial trait for any human — discipline. I’ve learned that means doing the things you need to do when you don’t want to do them and having a constant force pushing me to be my best every day. Discipline is earned through the challenges we face here.

Joshua Tolbert is a junior from North Charleston, South Carolina and a computer engineering major. On campus, he is the Regimental Public Affairs NCO and participates in the Gospel Choir, African American Association and The National Society of Black Engineers. After graduation, Tolbert plans to become a database administrator.

Related:

Mission Essential: Special Agent Brent Daniels, ’99

Mission Essential: Special Agent Yates Gupton, ’97

“I instantly knew that this was the place for me”: Meet Coast Guard veteran student Ricardo Quintero

A guide to Charleston, S.C., 4.5 hours from Raleigh

If you're ready to trade in oak trees for palms for a weekend, it might be time to visit Charleston.Driving the news: Oyster season (...

If you're ready to trade in oak trees for palms for a weekend, it might be time to visit Charleston.

Driving the news: Oyster season (for those who celebrate) is underway and temperatures have fallen to a degree that you can visit the city without evaporating immediately upon arrival.

A visit to the Holy City is a must. But don't take it from me — take it from Travel & Leisure magazine, who have named it the best city in the U.S. for ten straight years.

Getting here: Charleston is about 4-5 hours' driving distance from Raleigh. Flying might save you some time, but not much. Nonstop service between the two cities isn't currently offered.

Where to stay: Downtown, on the peninsula. If you're ballin' on a budget check out NotSo Hostel. If you're just ballin', go to Hotel Bennett.

Getting around: The peninsula is small enough that you can get around by foot, bicycle or rideshare. Don't worry about renting a car — we have limited parking spaces and a surplus of confusing, one-way streets.

Pro tip: Take a pedicab at least once. It's its own adventure.

Eat:

Don't let lunch or dinner be an afterthought. Charleston is perhaps best known for its culinary scene, and numerous restaurants, chefs and bar programs have received national recognition.

Lenoir: North Carolina's own chef Vivian Howard, of Chef & the Farmer in Kinston, opened two restaurants in Charleston in 2020. Lenoir, named for Howard's home county, offers Southern food that's elevated but in a way that doesn't stray too far from its roots.

167 Raw: This oyster and raw bar is right in the heart of downtown. Small plates are the way to go. Order the space potato — trust me.

Fleet Landing: Downtown's only true waterfront restaurant, its something-for-everybody menu includes Charleston classics, like shrimp and grits.

Drink:

Little Palm: This trendy, poolside cocktail bar opened last year, and this year was named one of the Best Bars in America by Esquire.

Eleve: Though you can't go wrong with any downtown rooftop bar, this one atop the Grand Bohemian Hotel stands out for its Alice In Wonderland-esque aesthetic.

Carmella's: The silver lining of being a city beloved by wedding and bachelorette parties is that they can support a high quantity of late-night dessert bars. Carmella's is the tried-and-true choice for grabbing an espresso martini and a slice of cake before calling it a night.

Do:

Tour: Take a harbor cruise, a walking ghost tour or visit one of our many museums.

Explore on foot: The best way to take in the city's architecture and natural beauty is to immerse yourself within it. Start in the historic district to see some of the oldest still-standing buildings in the country, then make yourself to White Point Gardens or Waterfront Park for harbor views.

Hit the beach: I can't in good conscience recommend a trip to this little coastal city without a visit to its coast.

For a no-frills, fried Lowcountry seafood dinner go to Bowens Island near Folly Beach. Avoid the line by getting there early. Stay for the sunset, if you can.

To pretend it's no-frills when there are actually plenty, go to Sullivan's Fish Camp on Sullivan's Island.

Yes, but: If you want to see the Lowcountry but don't like sand, skip the beach and go to Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant instead.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

Sullivan’s Island celebrates Carolina Day 2022

Residents and island visitors gathered on a clear Saturday at the steps of Town Hall Plaza on Sullivan’s Island to commemorate the 246th anniversary of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island, an annual event hosted by Battery Gadsden Cultural Center.On June 28, 1776, Sgt. William Jasper and others from the Second South Carolina Regiment, which was commanded by Col. William Moultrie, hoisted a regimental flag upon a partially completed palmetto ...

Residents and island visitors gathered on a clear Saturday at the steps of Town Hall Plaza on Sullivan’s Island to commemorate the 246th anniversary of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island, an annual event hosted by Battery Gadsden Cultural Center.

On June 28, 1776, Sgt. William Jasper and others from the Second South Carolina Regiment, which was commanded by Col. William Moultrie, hoisted a regimental flag upon a partially completed palmetto log fort to defend colonial Charleston against a major land and sea assault led by British Admiral Sir Peter Parker and Gen. Henry Clinton.

On Saturday, emcee Chuck Galis welcomed the gathering crowd to a Carolina Day celebration. Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil read a proclamation to kick off the ceremony. Members of Boy Scout Troop 59, which meets regularly at Stella Maris Church on the island, led a presentation and raising of the bright blue Moultrie Flag, followed by a dramatic musket salute by members of the modern-day Second South Carolina Regiment.

Maggie Adams, regent for St. Sullivan Chapter-NSDAR, recalled the life, death and courageous example of Col. Michael Kovats, a Hungarian cavalryman who trained and led the Continental Army during the British siege of Charleston. In January 1777, Kovats penned a letter to then-American Ambassador in France, Benjamin Franklin, in which he pledged his sword to defend the Continental Army’s cause. He famously closed the letter with the salutation, “Most faithful unto death.” Kovats ultimately gave his life in the American War for Independence on May 11, 1779. (Wikipedia reports, “To this date, Michael de Kovats is celebrated by cadets at The Citadel Military College in Charleston, South Carolina, where part of the campus is named in his honor. The Hungarian Embassy in Washington, D.C., has a statue sculpted by Paul Takacs and executed by Attila Dienes.”)

Mike Walsh, president of the Battery Gadsden Cultural Center, closed the ceremony by conveying the 2022 Cultural Stewardship Award to former Sullivan’s Island resident Wayne Stelljes. The Rev. Dr. Daniel W. Massie offered a benediction.

Rob Byko is a local Realtor and avid photographer. All photos in this story are by Rob Byko Photography and are copyrighted. All rights reserved.

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