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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Sullivan's Island, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Sullivan's Island:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Hot Properties: Sullivan's Island property sells for $2.8M

The Cassina Group founding partner Jimmy Dye participated in the sale of 1714 Middle St., a historic property between the lighthouse and Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island. The property sold for $2,785,000. Dye, broker-in-charge, was the only agent involved in the transaction.Located in the heart of Sullivan’s Island, this historic property was built in 1902 and served as the recreation hall and post exchange for Fort Moultrie.“This property is one of the most unique and historic properties on the island,&rdqu...

The Cassina Group founding partner Jimmy Dye participated in the sale of 1714 Middle St., a historic property between the lighthouse and Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island. The property sold for $2,785,000. Dye, broker-in-charge, was the only agent involved in the transaction.

Located in the heart of Sullivan’s Island, this historic property was built in 1902 and served as the recreation hall and post exchange for Fort Moultrie.

“This property is one of the most unique and historic properties on the island,” Dye said in a news release. “It was a pleasure to work with the sellers and buyers on this transaction.”

Recent commercial real estate transactions in the Lowcountry include:

Todd Garrett and Tradd Varner of Avison Young represented the seller, Edward C. Cox III, in the sale of 31.06 acres of land space at 0 Nexton Parkway in Summerville to Orange Capital Advisors LLC for $3,715,000.

Trey Lucy and Blair Belk of Belk Lucy represented the landlord in the lease of 1,255 square feet of retail space at 3530 Park Avenue Boulevard, Suite 103, in Mount Pleasant to Premier Martial Arts. Mike McKoy of Morrow Hill represented the tenant.

Kristen Krause of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the buyer, Wendy Mauro Design, in the sale of 1,200 square feet of office space at 100 Line St. in Charleston for $575,000.

Bob Caldwell and J.R. Caldwell of Caldwell Commercial Real Estate Services represented the buyer, Grammy's Attic LLC, in the sale of 3,623 square feet of warehouse space at 1184 Clements Ferry Road, Suite G, Charleston, to LLC Enterprises LLC.

Taylor Sekanovich and Vitré Stephens of Avison Young-South Carolina represented the tenant, Drama Kids Charleston, in the lease of 1,250 square feet square of retail space at 2052 River Road in Johns Island from Kebo Atlanta LLC.

Blair Belk and Trey Lucy of Belk Lucy represented the landlord in the lease of 2,500 square feet of retail space at 3032 W. Montague Ave., Unit 201, in North Charleston to Nostalgic Enterprises LLC. Jaysana Rodger of Trident Commercial represented the tenant.

Caine Halter and Neal Walsh of Coldwell Banker Commercial Atlantic represented the seller in the sale of land at 1370 Black Camps Road in Cross.

Kristie Roe of Colliers represented WLA Enterprises Inc. in the purchase of a 20,000-square-foot office complex on Shem Creek at 410 Mill St. in Mount Pleasant for $6,825,000.

Markus Kastenholz of Colliers represented ES10 LLC and JFM Properties LLC in the purchase of a 10,900-square-foot office building at 1520 Old Trolley Road in Summerville for $2.5 million.

Charleston-based restaurant expanding to the Queen City

The Co-Op will be on West Tremont Avenue in the South End neighborhood, near Hi-Wire Brewing and SPENGA.CHARLESTON, S.C. — Charleston-based restaurant The Co-Op is expanding to Charlotte and opening its doors in July.This will be its first North Carolina location. The Co-Op has multiple locations in South Carolina and has started an expansion to Tennessee.Patrons will be...

The Co-Op will be on West Tremont Avenue in the South End neighborhood, near Hi-Wire Brewing and SPENGA.

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Charleston-based restaurant The Co-Op is expanding to Charlotte and opening its doors in July.

This will be its first North Carolina location. The Co-Op has multiple locations in South Carolina and has started an expansion to Tennessee.

Patrons will be able to enjoy the eatery's signature drink -- frosé, or frozen rosé -- along with breakfast and lunch sandwiches, salads, and coffee.

The eatery has won awards for Best Frozen Drinks, Best Sullivan's Island Happy Hour, and Best Isle of Palms Restaurant.

"We're thrilled to bring The Co-Op to North Carolina and have more people enjoy our specialty sandwiches and of course our frosé," The Co-Op owner and founder Jess Patterson said.

"Charlotte is an amazing city with so much to offer, and we couldn't be more excited to be a part of its lively hospitality scene," Patterson said. "We foresee a lot of frosé and laid back beach vibes in the Queen City's future!"

The Co-Op Charlotte will be open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Opening date to come.

Flashpoint is a weekly in-depth look at politics in Charlotte, North Carolina, South Carolina, and beyond with host Ben Thompson. Listen to the podcast weekly.SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts || Spotify || Stitcher || Google Podcasts

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All of WCNC Charlotte's podcasts are free and available for both streaming and download. You can listen now on Android, iPhone, Amazon, and other internet-connected devices. Join us from North Carolina, South Carolina, or on the go anywhere.

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

Venita Aspen On Joining The Regular Cast Of Southern Charm For Season 8 - Exclusive Interview

For the past seven seasons, Bravo's "Southern Charm" has offered viewers a glimpse at the lives of Charleston, South Carolina's socialites. The series has followed the social lives, romantic entanglements, and many dramas of cast members like Craig Conover, Kathryn Dennis, ...

For the past seven seasons, Bravo's "Southern Charm" has offered viewers a glimpse at the lives of Charleston, South Carolina's socialites. The series has followed the social lives, romantic entanglements, and many dramas of cast members like Craig Conover, Kathryn Dennis, Shep Rose, Austen Kroll, and Naomie Olindo for years.

With Season 8 now airing, viewers have also gotten the chance to get to know Venita Aspen. Aspen is not entirely new to the series. The influencer and model came on "Southern Charm" as a guest in Season 7, but now she's a full member of the cast.

During an exclusive interview with The List, Aspen shared her experience being the new member of the cast. She also opened up about what it was like going from a Bravo fan to being part of a series, and how she's been trying to balance working full-time as an influencer with her filming schedule.

Venita's decision to join Southern Charm

You first came on "Southern Charm" as a guest star that would come into some episodes in Season 7. What is that like? What's the difference been like now in Season 8, being a full member of the cast?

I no longer have time in my day. It's all gone. If I'm not working as an influencer, I'm working for Bravo, and time does not exist anymore, but I love it.

That was actually one of my questions because you're also a model, an influencer, and now a reality TV star. How do you, or do you find any balance of free time?

I've gotten much better at finding balance. If you were to ask me that two years ago, I would've been like, "I don't know what balance is." I've done a pretty decent job of unplugging completely during the weekends, which has helped me balance the fact that I now have two full-time jobs.

What made you want to join the cast full-time?

I set the goal last season of, if I do good enough and they ask me to interview, I think I'll take it and see if I can do it. I would always [say], "I'll always try most things once," and this is one of those things I've always wanted to try. I was excited when I got the call and the opportunity to be a part of the cast.

What was your experience like this season? Do you think you'd want to do it again for another season?

This is the most chaotic my life has ever been, but I'd definitely do it again. I really did enjoy it. Even in the midst of chaos, there are so many good moments that happen when you're filming, and you get to build stronger relationships with people, and get to know people better, and see other sides of them that you might not necessarily see, so it's definitely rewarding and exciting.

Being the newbie of the cast

Did you have any worries going into this season, or was it mostly [you thinking], "How am I going to have the time?"

The time was one of my biggest worries because, at the time that we started filming, I was also the busiest that I had been in a while with my influencer work. That was one of my main worries, and my other worry was, "How accepted am I going to be as a newbie in the group?" Everyone had been on the show since the beginning. I'm coming in as my first year, and people have been on the show for at least seven or eight years, and it's like, "Okay, I hope they like me."

What did you feel your reception was like with the rest of the cast as you were coming in as a new person?

The majority of the cast was pretty welcoming. Everyone was excited to get to know me and see who I was and learn more about me, which was really refreshing because, as I said, I was nervous I was going to walk in there, and people were going to be like, "You've got to go. We don't like you."

What would you say was the biggest challenge being on this season?

The biggest challenge being on the season this year was not really being able to get one-on-one time with people that I know I could fix things with off-camera. That time was not allotted, so I feel like that was one of my biggest challenges.

Venita's philosophy on dealing with drama

Now that the episodes are coming out, how do you feel about watching it back and seeing yourself on reality TV?

It's wild. I don't know if you know, but I'm a big Bravo fan myself, so it's definitely full circle. I used to come home and watch Bravo religiously. I would leave events early. I would have parties with my girlfriends to watch new seasons and first episodes. Now, we fast forward, and I just had a watch party for an episode that I'm on. It's mind-blowing.

How do you feel about the way it's edited and how you come across in the show? Do you feel like it's pretty accurate to what you experienced in real-time?

They make it to where I'm a little more full of myself than I actually am. It's not really a bad thing. Some people don't like it. It's hard to have this much confidence, and then people don't really accept that too well, but it's fine.

On any reality show, there's a lot of drama. Did you have any philosophy going into the show, like "This is how I'm going to deal with that," or did you have any strategy?

No. I didn't want to think about it too much because I didn't want anything to seem too calculated. I was like, "Listen, if drama comes my way, I'm going to have to deal with it in the moment how I naturally would do it," and I'm not going to go in and be like, "I'm going to handle it this way, or I'm going to do that. I'm walking into this being my most authentic self, and I'm going to react in the most authentic way possible."

[Now that you're] an influencer and people know who you are. Do you feel like that's affected the way people who you've known in the past now treat you?

No, so far, so good. I haven't gotten any special treatment, or people haven't started acting weird yet, but I feel like as the season progresses, people are going to start coming out of the woodwork, for sure.

Fans will see more of her personality on Southern Charm

You mentioned you had a watch party. Are you just with your friends watching it the way you would watch a normal Bravo show?

This one was a little more planned, but I had a watch party out in a house on Sullivan's Island back home, and it was wild. I had 25 of my closest friends in there. We had good food, and we all turned the TV up at 9:00 and sat there and watched it. It was wild to go from having small watch parties at my house and now having a watch party where I'm actually involved in the episode. It was crazy.

That sounds insane. Have you noticed any big differences in your life since the show started coming out, or are you still kind of waiting for how that'll affect things?

I'm still waiting. So far, so good. I left Charleston for the summer, so I feel like that's helping with the fact that I haven't noticed any big changes yet. We'll see. I'm waiting for that moment to happen.

What is it like for your friends to watch you? Did they have any funny reactions?

Yes, my best friend Tati, who you guys might be able to see as the season progresses, she was in my ear the whole time. "Oh my God. I can't believe you're doing this. You're on TV. We've made it." We call each other T and V. She was like, "T and V is on TV now." It was fun. Everyone's been really supportive, which is super nice.

You've already been sharing your life on social media as an influencer. Do you feel like being on the show will give your fans a different side of you?

People will get to see me beyond the first nine squares that you see on Instagram. You can have a voice on Instagram and share your thoughts and things like that in stories, but that disappears after 24 hours, and a picture only says so many words, so it'll be nice for the audience that I had prior to the show to see more of me on TV and more of my personality.

Are there any parts of the show, or this season, that you're looking forward to coming out and seeing how people respond to it?

I don't really know. I pretty much know as much as you know right now, so we both have to wait and see.

New episodes of "Southern Charm" air Thursdays at 9:00 p.m. ET on Bravo. New episodes are also available Fridays for streaming on Peacock.

Sullivan’s Island investigating illegal cutting of maritime forest

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or st...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.

An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or stricter fines.

“This is the epitome of selfishness,” says Town Councilman Scott Millimet reacting to the cutting.

Island residents were also upset with the cutting. “It’s clear these trees weren’t cut by accident, I mean they were purposefully cut to someone’s benefit,” says one resident.

A number of trees along Station 26, the width of a house were chopped and dropped in the town’s maritime forest. The island’s forest has become the center of a debate to save the town’s accredited land over the last several years.

“It damages everybody, it doesn’t just (damage) the two neighbors,” the resident said.

Dozens of trees have been marked and documented by town employees after being cut down. Councilman Millimet says residents couldn’t believe it when learning of the illegal cutting.

“General shock, frustration – bitterness,” says Councilman Millimet when referring to what he’s heard from residents.

Each tree cut down comes with a $1,040 fine but residents and leaders say that might not be enough to prevent future cutting.

“This just proves that there are those out there that until the punishment is enhanced, it’s going to continue,” says Councilman Millimet.

Councilman Millimet believes the fines should be raised and jail time considered for those responsible. “We can try to do some replanting,” says Councilman Millimet. “And then I think we also need to focus on enhancing the punishment.”

Advocates fighting for the future of the maritime forest agree with the measure. “While there are penalties, they are not severe enough to disincentive someone from potentially doing this again,” says Karen Byko, President of Sullivan’s Island 4 All.

With the damage already done along Station 26, leaders and residents hope they can stop additional chopping in the future.

“At the very least, I hope they replant these trees,” says the resident.

“There’s quite a bit of work to do but like I said we’ve got to get the ball rolling because the longer we wait, certain residents have shown that they will act in their own best interest and we’ve got to figure out how to prevent that,” says Councilman Millimet.

Town officials declined to provide a comment on the latest in the investigation.

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