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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Summerville, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Summerville:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Summerville, SC

Summerville asks citizens for input on master plan to manage, maintain trees

SUMMERVILLE — Town officials are asking residents for their input to develop a master plan for sustainably managing trees.The Urban Forest Master Plan — a project funded in part through a $75,000 grant from the S.C. Forestry Commission and the U.S. Forest Service — will provide a framework for the town to better manage and maintain the trees, said Jessi Shuler, the town’s director of planning.Shuler wrote in an email that the project cost is $79,500.In order to help design the plan, Summerville re...

SUMMERVILLE — Town officials are asking residents for their input to develop a master plan for sustainably managing trees.

The Urban Forest Master Plan — a project funded in part through a $75,000 grant from the S.C. Forestry Commission and the U.S. Forest Service — will provide a framework for the town to better manage and maintain the trees, said Jessi Shuler, the town’s director of planning.

Shuler wrote in an email that the project cost is $79,500.

In order to help design the plan, Summerville recently released a survey for residents to fill out regarding trees. It’s a key part of the public outreach portion of the project, Shuler wrote.

“The questions are trying to gauge the public’s feelings and knowledge about trees in general; the town’s current management/policies for public and private trees; where trees are wanted/needed throughout town, etc.,” Shuler wrote.

She added that the data the town will receive from the survey will help shape the information, recommendations and priorities included in the plan.

The survey has been posted on the town of Summerville’s social media sites, including Facebook and Twitter. It features a QR code for people to scan and take the survey, as well as the big question at the top: “What do you think about Summerville’s trees?”

The survey comes at a time of massive development in Summerville, which has involved cutting down many trees in the town often called “Flowertown in the Pines.”

“This is a really hard time to hear this question when I barely recognize the entrance to my neighborhood because of the massive clear cutting for the Berlin G. extension,” Amy Perryman wrote on Facebook in response to the survey request, referring to the extension of the Berlin G. Myers Parkway expected to alleviate traffic on Main Street and other parts of downtown. Several comments under the post echoed Perryman’s sentiments.

The survey will be available until the end of the month.

The town, which recently celebrated its 175th anniversary, formed in 1847 when inhabitants incorporated specifically to protect local pine trees from being cut down by the encroaching railroad.

Town Councilman Russ Touchberry expressed his excitement about the master plan, saying he welcomes feedback from residents.

“Summerville was one of the absolute first municipalities to put protection on trees, and I think that’s a legacy that we need to take seriously,” Touchberry said. “But at the same time, we have to make sure what we’re doing is working for our citizens and for economic development.”

The town hired Ohio-based Davey Resource Group to be a consultant for the plan. Shuler wrote that the group is in the process of reviewing Summerville’s current urban forestry program.

The town hopes to have a first draft of the master plan from Davey by March or April.

To take the survey, go to the town of Summerville’s Facebook page or Twitter account.

LIVE 5 INVESTIGATES: Vulnerable adult injured in hit-and-run after escape from state-run facility

A woman with intellectual disabilities in the care of the state is now recovering after she was hit by a car, late at night on a Summerville road.SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - A woman with intellectual disabilities in the care of the state is now recovering after she was hit by a car, late at night on a Summerville road.Now, her family is asking how that was even possible in the first place.It was sometime between 12:30 and 12:42 a.m. on Oct. 16 when a car hit Mary Williams who was walking along Miles Jamison Road.Wi...

A woman with intellectual disabilities in the care of the state is now recovering after she was hit by a car, late at night on a Summerville road.

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - A woman with intellectual disabilities in the care of the state is now recovering after she was hit by a car, late at night on a Summerville road.

Now, her family is asking how that was even possible in the first place.

It was sometime between 12:30 and 12:42 a.m. on Oct. 16 when a car hit Mary Williams who was walking along Miles Jamison Road.

Williams, a 42-year-old, has intellectual disabilities and a depressive disorder.

She is a longtime resident, or consumer as they’re referred to, of the Coastal Regional Center, one of five state-run facilities for adults with disabilities run by the Department of Disabilities and Special Needs.

P.J. Perea, a spokesman for DDSN, said Williams was able to leave the facility around midnight. A Dorchester County Sheriff’s Office report states dispatch was not called until 12:24 a.m. regarding a consumer that was “walking along the roadway.”

By the time the authorities arrived on the scene, it was already too late.

She was found in bad shape, with fractures in her spine, hips, arms and face requiring multiple surgeries. She was on a ventilator, and her family says she almost didn’t make it.

Williams’ aunt and guardian Ruby Jones didn’t realize how bad it was until she saw her in the hospital.

“That was a difficult moment,” Jones said. “I was hurt, I was disappointed. Surprised would not have been a term that I would have used for what was going on. I was angry.”

The family is thanking God she’s alive and recovering, but she still remains bedridden, unable to do even the smallest task.

“We figured with her being in the Coastal Center. She would have been safe. She would have been protected and this situation should have never happened,” Williams’s cousin, Nicole Nick, said.

Williams was hit about a half-mile from the main entrance and several blocks down the road near Alwyn Boulevard. Ironically, that’s the entrance to the subdivision Nick lives in.

She thinks of her cousin and that night, every time she drives home.

“I was trying to understand, how something like that could have occurred,” Jones said.

When Live 5 Investigates asked to interview an administrator of the department, a spokesman declined. When asked why, they said it was “due to the nature of the incident [the department] felt it best to release a statement rather than conduct an interview.”

For Charleston lawyer and state representative Marvin Pendarvis, this story is a personal one. His big sister, Janae Pendarvis lives at the facility, too.

He tells us she’s been able to escape twice this year.

“Janae could as very well been the young lady that was hit by a car,” he said. “There was one incident where she had gotten so far down Miles Jamison road that a couple saw her, she was in a gown, and it was clear that she was lost... she needed to be driven back.”

An email to management from a former administrator obtained by Live 5 Investigates accuses staff of failing to intervene when another consumer has a “meltdown.”

She asks if staff can work to prevent her from leaving the building in the future, as the resident making it to the road is “becoming an everyday situation” and she worries about this consumer’s safety.

Dozens of pages obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request detail the ongoing problems with staff at the facility, though some were completely redacted, the department citing “privacy” as the reason.

One incident details an altercation between staff and a consumer in January 2022, where the consumer reportedly pushed, grabbed and pulled their hair and eventually put a staff member “in a chokehold.”

Management formally scolded one staff member who stood aggressively with “balled up fists” at the consumer, and another staff member left the campus during this fight for “personal business.”

Both were given a one-day suspension.

Another employee was suspended for one day for “failure to report an allegation of abuse” for an unknown incident.

“My mom has expressed these same concerns time and time and time again. We always talk about, they seem to be understaffed [and] the staff that they do have, they don’t seem to be equipped to handle the patients that are there,” Pendarvis said.

Over the Summer, SLED charged three former workers with “abuse of a vulnerable adult.”

Jones says her niece was the victim in that case, having been informed by SLED via phone.

“Of course, she always said things but because of her illness, sometimes they were kind of overlooked because... it’s not always accurate,” Jones said.

The agency reports surveillance video showed them hitting and kicking her, one watching it all happen. Williams reportedly received “minor injuries” at the time.

“I had no idea,” Jones said. “I really feel kind of hurt that she was not better protected.”

For these families, their hands are tied. Jones is unable to provide the full-time care that her niece requires access to. It’s a similar story for Pendarvis.

“The reality is there aren’t many facilities that are able to handle people with special needs and disabilities to the degree that my sister has them,” Pendarvis said.

Live 5 Investigates has previously reported concerns from staff members about understaffing, long shifts and little pay.

A year-long state audit of the department has been completed, at state Senator Katrina Shealy’s request.

She points out this is step one to finding a solution, for the hundreds of vulnerable people and their families who rely on the state.

“You can’t fix something if you don’t know what the problems are,” Sen. Shealy said.

It’s not scheduled to be published until early next year.

“The goal is to correct the problems, streamline the problems and make the agency more accountable,” she added.

As for Williams, her aunt now visits nearly every day, sometimes three times a day, to help bathe and feed her at the nursing home she’s recovering at.

Though where she will now call home is uncertain, her family is sure of one thing, she won’t be returning to the state’s care.

“Unfortunately, I don’t have the confidence that she will be safe at Coastal,” Jones said.

If you have a story or a tip you’d like for us to investigate, you can call our tip line 843-402-5678 or email us at tips@live5news.com.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Lexington basketball sweeps ranked foe Summerville, plus latest state polls

The Lexington basketball teams swept Summerville in a matchup of ranked teams on Tuesday.The seventh-ranked Wildcat girls defeated No. 4 Summerville, 56-50, in overtime while the fifth-ranked Lexington boys routed the No. 6 Green Wave, 75-48.In the girls game, Lexington led most of the second half before the Green Wave tied it at 47-47 with 4.4 seconds left. Summerville had a chance to win it but missed the game-winner at the end of regulation.In overtime, Lexington took the lead on Evie Godfrey’s basket and never ...

The Lexington basketball teams swept Summerville in a matchup of ranked teams on Tuesday.

The seventh-ranked Wildcat girls defeated No. 4 Summerville, 56-50, in overtime while the fifth-ranked Lexington boys routed the No. 6 Green Wave, 75-48.

In the girls game, Lexington led most of the second half before the Green Wave tied it at 47-47 with 4.4 seconds left. Summerville had a chance to win it but missed the game-winner at the end of regulation.

In overtime, Lexington took the lead on Evie Godfrey’s basket and never trailed in the extra session.

Godfrey, an eighth grader, had a career-high 17 in place of starter Jenna Yanity who missed the game with an illness. Lindsay Garner added 10 points for Lexington.

In the boys game, the Wildcats went on a 29-10 run in the first half to lead 34-25. Jaxon Prunty scored a season-high 22 points, and Cam Scott added 18. Kaleb Evans had 15.

Lexington 75, Summerville 48

L: Kaleb Evans 15, Bell 3, Cam Scott 18, Campbell 1, Jaxon Prunty 22, Maxwell 3, Figueroa 9. S: Smith 18, Jenkins 2, Teal 6, Brown 3, Taylor 2, Chisom 7, Davis 4, Smith 4, Miller 2

River Bluff 67, South Aiken 60

RB: Caldwell 5, Yasir Cromer 19, Nick Renner 12, Robbins 3, Bearden 6, Dawson Powell 11, Chapman 9, Wright 2. SA: Smith 15, Jackson 9, Walker 4, Jenkins 17, Creech 4, Phillips 7, Williams 4

Dutch Fork 58, Spring Valley 54

DF: Jarvis Green 15, Bryson Taylor 22, Sessions 8, Stagg 1. Toney 2, Smith 3, Johnson 5, Thompson 2..SV: Burgess 6, Justin Skelton 21, Dawson 1, Temoney 3, CJ Rich 15, Isler 6, Parks 2

Irmo 68, Airport 36

I: Brandon Crawford 12, Te’Andre Summons 12, Mason Collins 10, Albriitton 8, Whte 7, Madden Collins 7, Brand 7, Hopkins 3, Foster 2.

Blythewood 71, Westwood 39

B: Lamont Jackson 16, Jaiden Haltiwanger 15, Jayden Guess 12, Josiah Pack 10. W: Arden Conyers 16

Richard Winn 43, Laurens Academy 40

RW: Lawson Wade 14, Drew Spires 14, Caulder 6, Stuck 4, Wilson 3, Stewart 2.

Midland Valley 62, Chapin 51

C: Tyson Ray 20, Perry Armstead 12

Aiken 55, White Knoll 46

Dreher 52, Camden 38

C: Israel Macklin 10, Dre Wilson 10, Sweetenburg 5, Hunter 5, Stratford 4, Doby 2, Simon 2. D: Barr 9, Lominack 7, Owens 14, Glasscho 8, Moss 8, Tucker 2, Brown 2, Baker 2.

Cardinal Newman 72, Laurence Manning 32

CN: Elton Smith JR. 14, Jordan Frazer 12, Josiah Peeples 11, White 6, Carter 6, Rogers Jr. 5, Echevarria 5, Gillens 4, Harrington 4, Hart 3, Dessausure 2. LMA: Sanders 8, King 8, Nivens 5, Sumpter 5, Buddin 4, Durant 2

Lexington 56, Summerville 50 (OT)

L: Evie Godfrey 17, Lindsay Garner 10, Lytes 8.

Strom Thurmond 51, Gilbert: 46

Spring Valley 75, Dutch Fork 72

SV: JaiDah Liebert 21, Madison Entzminger 12, Imari Humphrey 10

Westwood 58, Blythewood 50

W: Jessica Woods 19, Korletta Daniels 12, Thanna Davis 12, Omeire 2, Makiah Thompson 10, Johnson 3.

Midland Valley 52, Chapin 48

Class 5A Boys

1. Dorman; 2. Goose Creek; 3. Conway; 4. Byrnes; 5. Lexington; 6. Summerville; 7. TL Hanna; 8. Ashley Ridge; 9. Carolina Forest; 10. Hillcrest

Class 5A Girls

1. Stratford; 2. Woodmont; 3. Rock Hill; 4. Summerville; 5. Spring Valley; 6. Mauldin; 7. Lexington; 8. Sumter; 9. Wando; 10. Fort Dorchester

Class 4A Boys

1. North Augusta; 2. Lancaster; 3. Wilson; 4. Irmo; 5. Greenville; 6. Indian Land; 7. Westside; 8. Catawba Ridge; 9. Greer; 10. West Florence

Class 4A Girls

1. North Augusta; 2. South Pointe; 3. South Florence; 4. Westwood; 5. AC Flora; 6. Pickens; 7. Hartsville; 8. Greer; 9. Westside; 10. Bluffton

Class 3A Boys

1. Crestwood; 2. Orangeburg-Wilkinson; 3. Chester; 4. Clinton; 5. Daniel; 6. Wren; 7. Marlboro County; 8. North Charleston; 9. Lake City; 10. Manning

Class 3A Girls

1. Southside; 2. Camden; 3. Wren; 4. Phillip Simmons; 5. Gilbert; 6. Blue Ridge; 7. Crestwood; 8. Lower Richland; 9. West Oak; 10. Marlboro County

Class 2A Boys

1. Gray Collegiate; 2. Wade Hampton; 3. Oceanside Collegiate; 4. Keenan; 5. Strom Thurmond; 6. Newberry; 7. Landrum; 8. Andrew Jackson; 9. Woodland; 10. Columbia

Class 2A Girls

1. Keenan; 2. Gray Collegiate; 3. Andrew Jackson; 4. Bishop England; 5. Silver Bluff; 6. Barnwell; 7. Fairfield Central; 8. Kingstree; 9. Strom Thurmond’ 10. Saluda

Class A Boys

1. Great Falls; 2. Scott’s Branch; 3. Christ Church; 4. High Point Academy; 5. Denmark-Olar; 6. Calhoun County’ 7. Southside Christian; 8. Hannah-Pamlico; 9. Johnsonville; 10. North

Class A Girls

1. Military Magnet; 2. Denmark-Olar; 3. High Point Academy; 4. Lake View; 5. Christ Church; 6. Carvers Bay; 7. Calhoun Falls; 8. McBee; 9. Cross; 10. Latta

Richard Miler announces his bid to be the next mayor of Summerville

On August 16, well-known local businessman, Richard Miler, stepped out in front of the process to announce his candidacy for Mayor of the Town of Summerville. Elections for that office will take place in November of 2023. Voters elect a mayor on a non-partisan ticket.“I made the announcement this far in advance because the last time I ran, I did not announce my candidacy until late and I was behind the game at the get-go,” said Miler. “Lots of people, including my wife, said if you’re going to do this, be proac...

On August 16, well-known local businessman, Richard Miler, stepped out in front of the process to announce his candidacy for Mayor of the Town of Summerville. Elections for that office will take place in November of 2023. Voters elect a mayor on a non-partisan ticket.

“I made the announcement this far in advance because the last time I ran, I did not announce my candidacy until late and I was behind the game at the get-go,” said Miler. “Lots of people, including my wife, said if you’re going to do this, be proactive. It’s always wise to seek prudent counsel from others.”

Miler lost his first bid for mayor twelve years ago to former Mayor Bill Collins.

Miler is owner and president of Miler Properties, which also operates under the name Miler Property Management. The real estate sector business has been in operation for close to 40 years and generates an estimated $3.6 million in annual revenue. The company, located on Old Trolley Road, typically employs 12 people.

A Summerville native son, Miler graduated from Summerville High School before completing studies at The Citadel in 1978. His background includes mortgage banking, teaching and coaching, and retail management. Miler has served as a board member on numerous organizations. He and his family are actively involved in the community.

“My family has been in this town for a long time,” said Miler. “My great grandfather, Dan Miler, was the first mayor of Summerville. My great, great grandfather, Edward Hutchinson, was the first attendant (the title in use before the term mayor was established). Hutchinson Square was named after him.”

Miler referred to the desire to be involved in public service as the footprint of his family. “It’s a passion that lives in your blood. The mayor is not a retirement job. You have to do it from the heart.”

Miler sees his role as a cheerleader to bring a positive vibe to the Town, working with a dynamic staff and town merchants, whom he calls the ‘heart of our town.’ “Everybody wants to make Summerville work; not just Downtown and Hutchinson Square. It’s growing like a weed,” he said, citing Nexton and Summers Corner.

There are a number of goals and issues that are top-of-mind for Miler:

• Prudent annexation to grow tax revenue without burdening the taxpayer and property owners - “We all pay property taxes regardless of our home, but that money is not nearly enough to fund the town coffers to pay for safety and other necessities or increase opportunities like parks and bicycle paths – that base comes from the commercial side. People think if they are annexed, their taxes are going up but that’s not always the case. There are so many doughnut holes in our current annexation. The Town can’t annex any whole entity; it’s one property at a time and they skip over each other like a jigsaw puzzle. There’s never been a game plan, a vision. As an example, there are seven subdivisions on Trolley Road — some are in the Town of Summerville; some are not.”

• “I am a strong, 100% supporter of the one-cent tax.” The 1% Transportation Sales and Use Sales Tax has been in effect for the past fifteen years and is scheduled to expire this year. This November, voters have a chance to renew it for up to fifteen years and generate up to $735 million to further investments in roads, streets, bridges and other transportation-related facilities as well as drainage facilities and mass transit systems. “That’s a lot of money to help with lots of projects.”

• “I’d like to see Summerville increase the downtown shopping district. It’s pretty and quaint, but it can grow — with shops, restaurants, a winery — there are so many people coming in to that district. It has to be safe, always, for little kids, carriages and strollers and bicycles. Lighting is important, and beautification.” Miler hopes to partner with the Flowertown Garden Club for beautification. “I have a real passion for that cause.” “What we don’t need is another real estate or lawyer’s office that shuts up at 5 p.m. and everybody goes home.”

• Parking in the Town’s parking deck should remain free, according to Miler. “It was built on the promise of free parking. I am interested in opportunities for parking relief. New businesses and restaurants are coming in and there are complaints that there’s no parking. People don’t want to go to an area and be bussed into town; they want to park.”

• “Traffic issues never really go away in a small town,” said Miler, with respect to ongoing issues. It’s an ongoing challenge but I’m thinking about what we can do now to improve quality of life.” “Plus, I would rather have those problems than live in an area that has no traffic problems, but where nothing is going on. When you have traffic problems, you have a good problem. People want to live there, work there.” Still, Miler says that as a mayor of a small town, he would vote to raise the gas tax to improve the roads and support user taxes such as toll roads coming in from other states.

• Affordable housing also has Miler’s attention. “My prayer is that there is a role for a mayor. There is a housing crisis and rents are incredibly high; the resale market has gone up. There is no such thing as affordable housing right now.” The problem will only be solved with a lot of people coming to the table to create solutions, getting developers on board, according to Miler. “It’s got to be without creating a stigma like affordable housing is a bad word. It’s not a bad word.”

Successful business is about establishing a staff that you work well with, selling or developing a product to sell to repeat clients and then doing what everybody has to do — embodying a trust that everyone can appreciate, according to Miler. “We’ve done that for 36 years. I see my business as a housing ministry. People buy or sell for different reasons: downsizing, growing, splintered by hardship — I’ve seen it all and it increases empathy.”

“Our business is people serving other people. I would take that approach whatever business I was in — taking care of people and being consistent. I think this perfectly prepares me to be mayor — to serve people from all walks of life, sexes, races, creeds, religions and ages.”

“My mission is to find out what can we do to help each other grow and support each other. If I am mayor, my policy is open door,” said Miler. “I believe in total transparency. You can call me anytime. It doesn’t fatigue me, it energizes me.”

No other individual has announced candidacy for Town of Summerville mayor thus far. Formal filing does not occur until spring.

ENGESER USA Corp. establishing first North American manufacturing operation in Dorchester County

COLUMBIA, S.C. – ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – ENGESER USA Corp., a world leading cable specialist, today announced plans to establish operations in Dorchester County. The company’s $1.5 million investment will create 26 new jobs.

Founded in 1983 and headquartered in Schramberg, Germany, ENGESER USA Corp. designs and manufactures high-quality products for cable and connection technology ranging from classic cable assembly to comprehensive system solutions. A family-owned company, ENGESER USA Corp. serves automotive applications, consumer and capital goods, solar engineering, rail technology and more.

Located at 115 Fabricators Street in Summerville, ENGESER USA Corp.’s Dorchester County facility is the company’s first North American manufacturing operation and will allow the company to offer direct delivery domestically and to European customers. The new facility will utilize modern technologies to produce cost-optimized, high-quality cable harnesses, one of ENGESER USA Corp.’s core areas of expertise.

Operations are expected to be online by September 2022. Individuals interested in joining the ENGESER USA Corp. team should visit the company’s careers page.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has awarded a $75,000 Set-Aside grant to Dorchester County to assist with costs related to this project.

QUOTES

“From the search for a location to the founding of the company, we were professionally accompanied by Dorchester County and the South Carolina Department of Commerce. As an experienced cable assembly products supplier, we are confident that we can add value to our customers in the United States. We intend to continue growing in Summerville and want to become an attractive employer.” -ENGESER USA Corp. Managing Director Dirk Kinzel

"South Carolina has earned a global reputation as an ideal location for companies to do business, and we are happy to welcome ENGESER USA Corp. to our roster of international firms operating in our state. We look forward to the impact they will make in the Dorchester County community and across all of South Carolina.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“We congratulate ENGESER USA Corp. on their first North American operation right here in South Carolina. By locating in Dorchester County, ENGESER USA Corp. is telling the world that our state has the workforce and business-friendly environment in place to attract companies of all types. We look forward to a strong partnership for many years to come.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

“We welcome ENGESER USA Corp. to Dorchester County and thank them for selecting us as their first location within the U.S. On behalf of the county, congratulations, and best wishes for future success.” -Dorchester County Council Chairman Bill Hearn

“We are pleased ENGESER USA Corp. selected the Charleston region for its first U.S. operation. They join an established group of German companies who are thriving here, and we look forward to ENGESER’s continued growth and expansion. The company will be a tremendous asset to our growing automotive cluster.” -Charleston Regional Development Alliance Board Chairman Mike Fuller

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