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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Summerville, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Summerville:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Summerville, SC

Preparing for Tropical Cyclone Nicole in Charleston, SC

This isn’t our first go-around this hurricane season, but you can never be too prepared. Here’s what we know so far about Tropical Cyclone Nicole and how you can stay informed and ready.As of Thursday, Nov. 10 at 11 a.m., there was a Tropical Storm Warning and Storm Surge Watch in effect for parts of the Lowcountry including Charleston County.The storm’s greatest ...

This isn’t our first go-around this hurricane season, but you can never be too prepared. Here’s what we know so far about Tropical Cyclone Nicole and how you can stay informed and ready.

As of Thursday, Nov. 10 at 11 a.m., there was a Tropical Storm Warning and Storm Surge Watch in effect for parts of the Lowcountry including Charleston County.

The storm’s greatest local impacts were expected to be felt on Thursday lasting into Friday. Prepare for possible coastal flooding, tornadoes, beach erosion, dangerous surf and rip currents, tropical-storm-force winds, and heavy rainfall.

Rainfall | Charleston County could see between 2-4 inches of rain. Check TIDEeye for tidal flooding reports.

Gas | Wondering which gas stations are still open? Use this map from GasBuddy to find an open gas station near you.

Power outages | You can track or report power outages using Dominion Energy’s online map. You can also check Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina’s outage map.

Road closures | Use the City of Charleston’s GIS map to track potential road closures.

Stay informed | Follow Nicoles path here. Stay up-to-date with the SC Emergency Management Division here, keep an eye out for a City of Charleston news flash, and sign up for Charleston County alerts.

Pets | This article wraps up a few tips to keep your furry friends safe whether you’re hunkering down at home or heading to a shelter.

Hurricane kits | Restock your hurricane kit with supplies from this list.

Additional resources | Go here for resources including emergency phone numbers and maps.

KION North America expanding operations in Dorchester County

Estimated $40 million investment will create approximately 450 new jobs COLUMBIA, S.C. – KION North America, a member of the KION Group, today announced plans to expand operations in Dorchester County. The company’s estimated $40 million investment will create approximately 450 new jobs.KION North America is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of industrial trucks. The company’s brands, Li...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – KION North America, a member of the KION Group, today announced plans to expand operations in Dorchester County. The company’s estimated $40 million investment will create approximately 450 new jobs.

KION North America is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of industrial trucks. The company’s brands, Linde Material Handling and Baoli, serve the specific requirements of the North American market with a comprehensive and complementary product portfolio known for innovative technologies, low energy consumption and low operating costs.

Headquartered at 2450 W. 5th Street in Summerville, KION North America is reshoring the manufacturing of core components including forklift masts. The company is also adding assembly lines that will involve the installation of crane systems, automated weld systems, new paint facilities and more.

The expansion is expected to be complete in 2024. Individuals interested in joining the KION North America team should visit the company’s careers page.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved job development credits related to this project. The council also approved a $500,000 Set-Aside grant to assist with the costs of site preparation and building construction.

QUOTES

“We are proud to be investing in South Carolina, particularly in Dorchester County. Both the state and county have been excellent partners in this process. The KION Group is highly committed to expanding in the U.S., Canada and Mexico and believes customers deserve products customized for these markets. We look forward to reaching more customers with our full-scale traditional lift truck portfolio and custom solutions such as automation, telematics and fleet management.” -KION North America President and Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Dawley

“Thanks to our state’s exceptional workforce and business-friendly environment, global leaders like KION Group are finding success here and driving our economy forward. Congratulations to KION North America on this latest expansion.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“We applaud KION North America’s ongoing growth in Dorchester County and the new opportunities they are creating for South Carolinians with this expansion. When a company decides to grow its footprint in South Carolina, it reiterates our state’s support for existing industries.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

“KION North America has been a valued part of Dorchester County, and we are thankful for their continued presence and new investment in our comunity. Congratulations KION North America on your new expansion, and we wish you continued success.” -Dorchester County Council Chairman Bill Hearn

FIVE FAST FACTS

Fort Dorchester survives Summerville to earn state title berth

Summerville and Fort Dorchester have been playing each other in football since 1993, the first year in Fort Dorchester’s history. Fort Dorchester was created through a split of Summerville’s enrollment, and thus a natural rivalry was born.Summerville dominated the first 17 years of the series, winning 15 times. Fort Dorchester has closed the gap considerably, winning eight of the last nine meetings.No game in the series had more on the line than the one played on Friday night at Bagwell Stadium in North Charleston. ...

Summerville and Fort Dorchester have been playing each other in football since 1993, the first year in Fort Dorchester’s history. Fort Dorchester was created through a split of Summerville’s enrollment, and thus a natural rivalry was born.

Summerville dominated the first 17 years of the series, winning 15 times. Fort Dorchester has closed the gap considerably, winning eight of the last nine meetings.

No game in the series had more on the line than the one played on Friday night at Bagwell Stadium in North Charleston. Much bigger than a region title or area bragging rights, this game was for a spot in the Class AAAAA state championship game next Saturday.

Fort Dorchester ended up winning a hard-fought battle, 24-10. The game was tied at seven after two quarters, but the Patriots pulled away down the stretch.

“The resiliency of these kids, man this is special,” Fort Dorchester head coach Steve LaPrad said. “This team has been through so much this year. It’s been really tough. Then we lose our starting center in the first series. We lost our punter, holder, punt returner and best receiver (Tre Ryan) before tonight. It’s just been a really tough, hard season. All that makes this even more gratifying.”

Fort Dorchester was 2-3 after five games, but has won its last nine games. State power Dutch Fork will be the opponent in next Saturday’s noon kickoff at Benedict College. Dutch Fork eliminated Fort Dorchester in the semi-finals last season.

Fort Dorchester’s best drive of the opening half came on its first possession. The Patriots covered 80 yards on 12 plays with freshman Ryan Campbell scoring on a six-yard run with 1:48 left in the first quarter.

The Green Wave took advantage of a poor punt resulting in great field position midway through the second quarter. A 36-yard pass from Campbell McCurry to Yannick Smith set up a three-yard run by Marquez Spells to tie the game with 4:44 left in the first half.

Fort Dorchester opened the second half the same way it started the game, putting together an impressive 15-play drive before Summerville was able to force a 30-yard field goal from Christian Wilson for a 10-7 lead.

Summerville again answered, driving inside the Patriots’ 10-yard line before also having to settle for a tying 25-yard field goal from Mason Ayers with 2:27 remaining in the third period.

More special teams play put Fort Dorchester up early in the fourth.

Cam Crummey’s (Ryan’s replacement) 69-yard punt return to the Summerville six-yard line set up Davian Brown’s scoring run, pushing the Patriots to a 17-10 lead with 9:29 remaining in the game. Brown finished the game with 108 yards on 22 carries, 75 yards in the second half.

After forcing a Summerville punt, the Patriots secured the victory with a 46-yard pass from Zolten Osborne to Mul-ty Snider, pushing the lead to 24-10 with 2:42 remaining in the game.

Osborne has battled a shoulder injury since the third game of the season but looked as healthy as he has been all season. Osborne completed 7 of 15 passes for 140 yards in the game.

LaPrad is taking his program to its second state final in his 20th season. The Patriots won the Class AAAA title in 2015.

“People don’t realize how hard it is to win,” LaPrad said. “Everyone wants to beat us. It’s tough but these kids are winners.”

Figueroa, Lightweights Shine at Cliff Keen Invitational

LAS VEGAS - Sun Devil Wrestling's lightweights shined at the Cliff Keen Invitational this weekend. Richard Figueroa, a redshirt freshman, won the 125 weight class, while two-time All-Americans Michael McGee and ...

LAS VEGAS - Sun Devil Wrestling's lightweights shined at the Cliff Keen Invitational this weekend. Richard Figueroa, a redshirt freshman, won the 125 weight class, while two-time All-Americans Michael McGee and Kyle Parco both finished as runners-up at 133 and 149, respectively. ASU leaves Las Vegas as the sixth-place team. Nebraska, NC State and South Dakota State finished 1-2-3. Out of 10 wrestlers, five finished on the podium.

Full brackets and results

— Sun Devil Wrestling (@ASUWrestling) December 3, 2022

"Overall we weren't quite where we wanted to be this weekend," head coach Zeke Jones said. "We're at a place now where it's 'win it or it's a disappointment,' and I don't think that's a bad thing. I think our kids want to compete at the highest level and win."

Figueroa was unranked coming into the tournament but was seeded fifth and went on to sweep a field that included '22 US Open champion and NCAA qualifier No. 8 Matt Ramos (Purdue).

"Richie winning, that's awesome," Jones said. "You get a freshman winning a tournament like Las Vegas, that puts you in position to win a national title. I'm really proud of him. Kyle and Michael ran into some tough guys, and their opponents were some of the top guys in the country. I just think those two have to continue to get better and improve and they'll be in the national champion mix."

McGee blew through his bracket, opening the tournament with a pin before getting back-to-back major decisions. In the 133 championship match, he faced off against two-time All-American Vito Arujau (Cornell) and ultimately fell 3-2. Parco had a similar run, comfortably handling all of his opponents before meeting Ohio State's two-time All-American Sammy Sasso. Sasso took the match 6-2.

Cliff Keen Las Vegas Invitational Richard Figueroa - 1st (125) Michael McGee - 2nd (133) Kyle Parco - 2nd (149) Kordell Norfleet - 8th (197) Cohlton Schultz - 8th (HWT)

125 Richard Figueroa (Arizona State) F Blair Orr Charleston, SC (The Citadel), 3:13 125 Richard Figueroa (Arizona State) DEC Kurt Mchenry Ann Arbor, MI (Michigan), 7-1 SV 125 Richard Figueroa (Arizona State) DEC Brett Ungar ithaca, NY (Cornell), 6-2 TB2 125 Richard Figueroa (Arizona State) DEC Tanner Jordan Brookings, SD (SDSU), 6-3 125 Richard Figueroa (Arizona State) DEC Matt Ramos West Lafayette, IN (Purdue), 3-2

133 Michael Mcgee (Arizona State) F Paul Woo Athens, OH (Ohio), 0:47 133 Michael Mcgee (Arizona State) MD Kurtis Phipps Irwin, PA (Bucknell), 8-0 133 Michael Mcgee (Arizona State) MD Kai Orine Raleigh, NC (NC State), 18-4 133 Michael Mcgee (Arizona State) DEC Dylan Ragusin Elk Grove Village, IL (Michigan), 5-1 133 Vitali Arujau Syosset, NY (Cornell) DEC Michael Mcgee (Arizona State), 6-1

— Sun Devil Wrestling (@ASUWrestling) December 3, 2022

141 Jesse Vasquez (Arizona State) F Joel Vandervere Evanston, IL (Northwestern), 1:58 141 Brock Hardy Brigham City, UT (Nebraska) F Jesse Vasquez (Arizona State), 1:51 141 Jesse Vasquez (Arizona State) DEC Louis Newell Kent, OH (Kent State), 4-1 141 Jesse Vasquez (Arizona State) M FOR Garrett Kuchan Christiansburg, VA (Air Force) 141 Tom Crook Blacksburg, VA (Virginia Tech) DEC Jesse Vasquez (Arizona State), 7-5

149 Kyle Parco (Arizona State) F Kyle Schickel Lemont, IL (Clarion), 1:18 149 Kyle Parco (Arizona State) DEC Alek Martin Brookings, SD (South Dakota State), 9-4 149 Kyle Parco (Arizona State) DEC Chance Lamer Corvallis, OR (Michigan), 4-1 149 Kyle Parco (Arizona State) DEC Jonathan Millner Greensboro, NC (App. State), 4-1 149 Sammy Sasso Nazareth, PA (Ohio State) DEC Kyle Parco (Arizona State), 6-2

157 Luka Wick murrieta, CA (Cal Poly) MD Michael Kilic (Arizona State), 11-1 157 Rhise Royster Rahway, NJ (Long Island ) DEC Michael Kilic (Arizona State), 3-1

165 Tony Negron (Arizona State) MD David Ferrante Lake in the hills, IL (Northwestern), 12-3 165 Tony Negron (Arizona State) DEC Jordan Slivka Athens, OH (Ohio), 6-2 165 Austin Yant Waverly, IA (Northern Iowa) MD Tony Negron (Arizona State), 11-2 165 Bubba Wilson Manhattan, KS (Nebraska) DEC Tony Negron (Arizona State), 3-1

174 Joseph Walker Mishawaka, IN (Michigan) F Cael Valencia. (Arizona State), 6:38 174 Jared Simma Shawnee, KS (Northern Iowa) MD Cael Valencia. (Arizona State), 12-4

184 Anthony Montalvo. (Arizona State) DEC Zayne Lehman Akron, OH (Ohio), 6-2 184 Anthony Montalvo. (Arizona State) DEC William Feldkamp Pinckney, MI (Clarion), 4-2 SV 184 Parker Keckeisen cedar falls, IA (Northern Iowa) DEC Anthony Montalvo. (Arizona State), 5-3 184 Cade King Brookings, SD (SDSU) DEC Anthony Montalvo. (Arizona State), 5-3

197 Kordell Norfleet. (Arizona State) MD Javen Jovero San Marcos, CA (Columbia), 15-3 197 Kordell Norfleet. (Arizona State) MD Ethan Hatcher Brecksville, OH (Cornell), 11-1 197 Tanner Harvey Corvallis, OR (Oregon State) DEC Kordell Norfleet. (Arizona State), 5-2 197 Kordell Norfleet. (Arizona State) DEC Trey Rogers Hastings, MN (Hofstra), 8-7 197 Tanner Sloan alburnett, IA (SDSU) DEF Kordell Norfleet. (Arizona State), 2-0 0:32 197 Jacob Koser Dillsburg, PA (Navy) M FOR Kordell Norfleet. (Arizona State), 0-0 0:00

285 Cohlton Schultz (Arizona State) F Chris Island VACAVILLE, CA (California Baptist ), 0:41 285 Cohlton Schultz (Arizona State) F Cale Davidson Wichita, KS (Nebraska), 1:52 285 Aj Nevills Brookings, SD (South Dakota State) DEC Cohlton Schultz (Arizona State), 5-2 285 Cohlton Schultz (Arizona State) MD Lee Herrington Kearney, NE (Nebraska-Kearney), 11-1 285 Tyrell Gordon Waterloo, IA (Northern Iowa) M FOR Cohlton Schultz (Arizona State) 285 Owen Trephan Summerville, SC (NC State) M FOR Cohlton Schultz (Arizona State)

Summerville Preservation Society celebrates 50 years

While Summerville celebrates its 175th birthday, the organization most active in safeguarding the city’s history is marking its own 50th anniversary and five decades of watering Flower Town’s roots.The Summerville Preservation Society (SPS) chartered in March 1972, and while its membership numbers have expanded from that original core group to more than 500, its mission remains the same. By protecting and showcasing the landmark facets of what the town has been, the SPS hopes to imbue a pride of place that lingers on in wh...

While Summerville celebrates its 175th birthday, the organization most active in safeguarding the city’s history is marking its own 50th anniversary and five decades of watering Flower Town’s roots.

The Summerville Preservation Society (SPS) chartered in March 1972, and while its membership numbers have expanded from that original core group to more than 500, its mission remains the same. By protecting and showcasing the landmark facets of what the town has been, the SPS hopes to imbue a pride of place that lingers on in what it becomes.

“Everything we undertake, we do for the benefit of the citizens. We do this so that the people who come after us can appreciate Summerville,” said Heyward Hutson, SPS President since 1988. Hutson’s great-great grandfather, Reverend Robert Ilderton Limehouse, built Summerville’s first Town Hall in 1860 and later served as Mayor of Summerville. The “new” Town Hall moved to Hutchinson Square in 1892.

With his encyclopedic memory for names and events, Hutson stood on the original heart pine planks of Old Town Hall and described the village that Summerville once was, as if he had just strolled its 1800s marketplace.

“The planters came to Summerville to spend the hot months, from the last frost in spring to the first frost in fall. They came in wagons, with their cows and their chickens, all along the Grand Way, which is now West Carolina Avenue,” said Hutson, a retired Army Colonel who was elected to the South Carolina Legislature four years after he became SPS President. He was born in Summerville in 1936.

“At that time, the first Town Hall was the center of the village, and the market was just out front there.”

The SPS kicked off its long, private non-profit career by rescuing an old Magnolia Street home from “rack and ruin,” and later thwarted several attempts to demolish the old Dorchester County Hospital — now repurposed in its original state as the Dorchester County Human Services Building.

Its next coup was the 1990 purchase of Old Town Hall, one of many structures devastated by Hurricane Hugo and the thousands of trees it toppled throughout the Lowcountry. Taking the venerable building “as-is,” the SPS replaced the roof on one of the wings and repaired it according to historic standards and has maintained it as its seat of operations ever since.

Crediting the real estate agent and the lawyer who gave their services for free to make that transaction happen, Hutson also noted that the relatively small membership of the SPS’ 1990 roster managed to pay off the remaining $85,000 loan in eight years — despite the 10 percent interest rate.

Aside from the restoration of a few key historic buildings, the SPS also began the historic marker project — the signposts at landmark sites that give a brief description of each.

Involving a protracted process of site research, obtaining approval from the state Department of Archives and History, financing each piece and finally, purchasing and installing each marker, the SPS project has claimed historic designation for several well-known Summerville spots: Guerin’s Pharmacy, the Pine Forest Inn, McKissick Summerville High School, The Old White Meeting House, Stallsville, Old Town Hall, Bacon’s Bridge and Tea Farm Road.

Other SPS projects include its fund-raisers, which feature local writers and artists. The SPS painting series features the work of nine area artists, all of which memorialize historic sites throughout Summerville and Dorchester County. The book, “Beth’s Pineland Village,” is still selling copies 35 years later. With half its proceeds going to the SPS and half to the historic Timrod Library, it is a compilation of Summerville Scene newspaper articles written by Beth McIntosh, the first president of the SPS and a former member of the Summerville City Council.

The SPS hosts regular “Heritage Series” panel discussions that are open to the public, and expanded the historic district by adding additional designations, such as St. Stephens Chapel.

Finally, the society also established an awards program to honor the lengths that owners must go through in order to restore and maintain their historic properties.

Just a quick Internet glance indicates that repair costs for a historic Charleston home run anywhere from $250,000 to $1.3 million — and that’s just for repairs, not yearly upkeep. On the other hand, having vibrant historic districts in a city also increases property values and homeowner returns on investments.

Of course, not all of Summerville is historic, and keeping a town healthy is a balancing act. The bustle of modern commerce is necessary for a thriving economy, ensuring jobs for residents and enough quality goods and services to attract and keep the money at home. But unchecked, that same hustle and bustle can trample the character of a place into the dust.

“We are not opposed to the development of boutique hotels,” said Hutson.

“We are opposed to high-concentration developments that tear down existing historic homes when there are vacant lots available nearby. It’s unbridled development that we’re opposed to. But while some Summerville old-timers aren’t happy about the congestion, we need to realize that the new people who have come here bring new talent and, sometimes, as much or more respect for the history of Summerville and Dorchester County than even some of the natives have.”

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