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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Tega Cay, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Tega Cay:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Tega Cay, SC

York County sues Rock Hill, Tega Cay over money for housing jailed inmates

York County and its sheriff have filed a lawsuit against the cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay over payment for housing inmates at the county jail.The lawsuit, filed around 5 p.m. Wednesday, is the latest public dispute concerning money -- the Carolina Panthers practice facility apparently has ended because of a dispute over money -- involving York County and Rock Hill.In the lawsuit, York County says the...

York County and its sheriff have filed a lawsuit against the cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay over payment for housing inmates at the county jail.

The lawsuit, filed around 5 p.m. Wednesday, is the latest public dispute concerning money -- the Carolina Panthers practice facility apparently has ended because of a dispute over money -- involving York County and Rock Hill.

In the lawsuit, York County says the municipalities of York, Fort Mill and Clover have agreed to pay the county $73 per day to house inmates, but Rock Hill and Tega Cay have refused.

Rock Hill leaders acknowledged the lawsuit was filed, but claim the county has not said how it came up with the $73 per prisoner daily fee, a city written statement to The Herald said. Rock Hill residents already pay almost $8 million annually in taxes to support the sheriff’s office, the city statement said.

York County and the York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson are both plaintiffs in the lawsuit. The cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay are both named as defendants.

The lawsuit states the sheriff’s office has a legal responsibility under South Carolina law to house inmates and operate a county jail. Countywide taxes are collected for this purpose, the lawsuit states.

The issue of conflict is whether the municipalities have to reimburse the county, and how much the municipalities should pay.

The sheriff’s office will continue to accept inmates from Rock Hill and Tega Cay until the issue is resolved by the court, according to the lawsuit. It remains unclear when a judge will order a hearing on the issue.

The full statement from York County reads;

“On Wednesday, due to actions by the Cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay, York County and Sheriff Kevin Tolson took steps to protect their interests, and the interests of the taxpayers, through legal proceedings. The Cities inside York County have an obligation under the law to provide jail detention services for individuals that they detain. For many years those detention services have been provided by agreement with the County and Sheriff Tolson at the York County Detention Center. Under that agreement the Cities reimburse the County and Sheriff Tolson for the cost of detaining their municipal inmates. This arrangement results in reduction of overall cost for most municipalities when compared to the cost of constructing and operating detention facilities themselves.

“Last year, the Cities declined to pay the County and the Sheriff for these detention services and expected to continue to send their detainees without payment. More recently, the Cities have refused to enter into written agreements with the County and Sheriff Tolson, as required by law, that would govern this joint provision of services. The County and Sheriff Tolson have worked for more than six months to negotiate and obtain the required signatures from each of the County’s municipalities for such a written agreement. Clover, Fort Mill, and York all have signed such agreements; Rock Hill and Tega Cay refuse. This lawsuit seeks a court’s determination that, if Rock Hill and Tega Cay desire to have the County and Sheriff Tolson provide these detention services on their behalf, then they are required to enter written agreements governing the arrangement.”

York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson declined comment.

In a statement to The Herald, the city of Rock Hill said county leaders first tried to make the per day payment almost $100 per day before the amount was cut to $73. But the county still won’t say where the $73 per day cost comes from, and refuses to negotiate, the statement said.

Records obtained by the Herald show the previous amount for was around $43-$42.88 per day per inmate.

The city states that any payments are voluntary and not required under South Carolina law.

The city statement says:

“Today, York County took the unfortunate step of filing a lawsuit against municipalities in York County. The County is completely aware of the City of Rock Hill position that these fees have historically been paid voluntarily as they are not required under state law.

The City does not entirely object to voluntarily paying a fee; however, the City only plans to do so under a fairly negotiated agreement. Just over one year ago, York County unilaterally and arbitrarily announced it was raising the daily fees for boarding prisoners to almost $100 per prisoner per day, essentially doubling the fee. This was done with no provision of information or background on how the fee was calculated.

Many of the municipalities in York County announced they would not pay these fees. Several months later the County provided new information to the municipalities that reduced these arbitrary fees by approximately 20%. However, again no adequate justification was provided for how the fee was calculated.

In the spirit of cooperation and good faith, the City has paid all fees associated with the dispute. The fee has been voluntarily paid, even though there is no law requiring the City to do so. In fact, the state statute requires the County to board all municipal prisoners with no provision for fees....

Beyond paying these fees, City of Rock Hill taxpayers already fund operations related to the Sheriff’s Office through County property taxes paid to the tune of approximately $7.9 million a year. Surely, Rock Hill residents have paid their fair share to York County for these services.

The City has made several offers on how we would be comfortable moving forward under a fairly negotiated agreement; however, York County has refused to negotiate. We look forward to providing additional information before the court and vigorously defending the residents of Rock Hill all of whom are also residents of York County.”

Efforts to reach the city manager of Tega Cay by email were unsuccessful.

The lawsuit is a public record and can be viewed by the public here at sccourts.org.

This story was originally published April 22, 2022 10:43 AM.

S.C. ice cream shop saved by customers who loved it

It is hard to say an exact number for how many small businesses closed temporarily or permanently because of COVID, but this one found a savior in a loyal customer.A beloved ice cream shop in Tega Cay was close to closing its doors for good before an early Christmas miracle saved the store.TEGA CAY, S.C. (WBTV) - Like so many locally owned businesses that have struggled to keep their door open through COVID, a beloved ice cream shop in Tega Cay was close to closing its doors for good before an early Christmas miracle saved th...

It is hard to say an exact number for how many small businesses closed temporarily or permanently because of COVID, but this one found a savior in a loyal customer.

A beloved ice cream shop in Tega Cay was close to closing its doors for good before an early Christmas miracle saved the store.

TEGA CAY, S.C. (WBTV) - Like so many locally owned businesses that have struggled to keep their door open through COVID, a beloved ice cream shop in Tega Cay was close to closing its doors for good before an early Christmas miracle saved the store.

Like many others that walk through the doors of Scoop N Swirl, Betsy Coleman has been coming here for years.

”My son Adam actually had his birthday party here as a little boy. We sat at the table and he had his little friends here and we ate ice cream,” says Coleman.

So to hear that the owners were going to close it after not securing a successor was devastating.

”It was really sad when we thought they were going to close,” she says.

The ice cream shop is filled with the sweet smell of fresh-baked waffle cones and the memories of people who love it. Those are the reasons why it is still here today.

Ray Zerrusen has bought his wife’s birthday cake here every year for the last 17 years. His wife Shannon’s favorite cake is one with cookie dough and Oreos. So when he heard this would be his last cake, he knew he had to jump into action.

”Instead of just owning a birthday cake I own a birthday cake and an ice cream shop now,” says Zerrusen.

Zerrusen bought the store and now co-owns it with Shannon. The shop still selling the same ice cream with all the fixings people have come to love. All of the recipes are still the same as well. The previous owners are the ones teaching the new owners how to make it all.

”They come in here with almost tears in their eyes they are so happy to know it’s open again,” he says.

The previous owners retired after a tough year across the country with COVID closing businesses and increasing food prices. They wanted to spend more time with their children and grand children. However, Zerrusen says they mostly wanted to give the shop they loved to someone who would care about it so they could retire. They worked at the shop seven days a week for about eight hours.

”I think it got harder for them in the last year. I definitely think the workforce had something to do with it,” he says.

Those hardships are still around and not lost on Zerrusen, but he is finding worth in the sweeter things in life.

”I thought once or twice should we really open up now but really we wanted to keep this ice cream shop going. And it really warms your heart seeing the little kids get ice cream and it puts a big smile on their face,” he says.

So regulars like Coleman can keep coming back for the ice cream and the memories.

”I wish we knew the recipe for the ice cream,” says Coleman.

Scoop N Swirl has been in business since 2002 and was and continues to be family-owned since that opening date.

Copyright 2021 WBTV. All rights reserved.

South Carolina towns near Charlotte adapting to growth while facing COVID-19 challenges

Fort Mill Medical Center, an extension of Piedmont Medical Center, will soon open with 380 employees. The center was a big need in the rapidly growing community.FORT MILL, S.C. — Just across the border from Charlotte are the South Carolina communities of Fort Mill and Tega Cay -- and growth in the Queen City has been spilling over across the state border.These towns are adapting to the growth while managing lingering challenges in hospitals and schools from the effects of COVID-19.“Lots of healthcare workers ...

Fort Mill Medical Center, an extension of Piedmont Medical Center, will soon open with 380 employees. The center was a big need in the rapidly growing community.

FORT MILL, S.C. — Just across the border from Charlotte are the South Carolina communities of Fort Mill and Tega Cay -- and growth in the Queen City has been spilling over across the state border.

These towns are adapting to the growth while managing lingering challenges in hospitals and schools from the effects of COVID-19.

“Lots of healthcare workers developed PTSD, lots of nurses stopped practicing,' Piedmont Medical Center CEO Mark Nosacka said. "In addition to that, everybody else wants healthcare - surgeries, etcetera. So the demands on every hospital in America have exceeded capacity."

Nosacka spoke at a community breakfast gathering Thursday, sharing the reality hospitals are dealing with. He said there are more people dying in hospitals now than during the first wave of the pandemic and 85-90% of those dying are unvaccinated.

Healthcare workers are having to make tough decisions related to care.

"Here’s what we have to do -- we have to run an emergency room, we have to treat the COVID patients safely so everybody else doesn’t get sick, we have to deliver babies, and we have to do emergency surgery," Nosacka said. "That’s what we have to, have to do. Everybody else we’ve got to triage and decide, 'Can we slow down care to accommodate for all those emergencies first?'"

But there is help on the way. Fort Mill Medical Center, an extension of Piedmont Medical Center, will soon open with 380 employees. The medical center was a big need in a community that is rapidly growing.

The superintendent of the Fort Mill School District, Chuck Epps, pointed out major growth in the area: in 1995, the district had 3,500 students and four school sites. Today, there are nearly 18,000 students with 20 school sites.

"So really the challenge that this school district has faced has been one of building schools, building capacity for all these new students," Epps said.

Epps said the plan is to add a referendum to the ballot sometime in the next few years to pay for new schools. The Fort Mill School District is the smallestgeographically in the state, but is also the fastest-growing right now.

An advisory on Lake Wylie warns to keep clear of detected toxins. Here’s where.

Boaters, swimmers and other recreational users on Lake Wylie should steer clear of potentially harmful algae blooms, says the state health department.The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control issued a recreational water advisory Thursday for a portion of the lake after detecting the bloom. A DHEC monitoring site shows the advisory for a cove off Acacia Road, on the main ...

Boaters, swimmers and other recreational users on Lake Wylie should steer clear of potentially harmful algae blooms, says the state health department.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control issued a recreational water advisory Thursday for a portion of the lake after detecting the bloom. A DHEC monitoring site shows the advisory for a cove off Acacia Road, on the main channel from the Concord Road peninsula in Lake Wylie.

Pets and livestock can be harmed by microtoxins from an algae bloom. People can become sick. Fish caught in those areas should be rinsed thoroughly before consumption.

An advisory is issued when an algae bloom is identified and is producing toxins greater than state recreational standards, according to DHEC. Nine more monitoring stations on the lake have watches. A watch means a bloom has been identified but isn’t yet producing toxins at or beyond the state threshold for an advisory.

Most of the watch level samples are in and around Tega Cay, prompting flash messages to the public from the city. The advisory level cove is across the lake from the city. There also is a watch on a Rock Hill cove near Lake Wylie Dam.

DHEC routinely monitors stations across the South Carolina sides of Lake Wylie. A Sept. 28 test resulted in high levels of microcystins, toxins produced by cyanobacteria. It’s formerly known as blue-green algae. Tests found levels at least 25% higher than the state safety threshold.

The algae has been seen throughout several coves, but the area of the advisory reaches along the shoreline of the lake. The watches do not include open water sections of the lake.

“Until further notice, no one should swim, wade or come into contact with any discolored water or scum, foam or algae in Lake Wylie ,” DHEC aquatic science program manager Bryan Rabon said in a release Thursday.

DHEC is in contact with North Carolina environmental agencies, along with Duke Energy that manages the Catawba River and its lakes.

Anyone who experiences illness after coming in contact with the water should seek medical attention. Veterinarians should be contacted for any pets or livestock that may come in contact with the blooms.

In August, and again in September, the Charlotte Observer reported blue-green algae blooms spotted on the North Carolina side of Lake Wylie. Blooms were spotted near Boyds Cove, not far from the state line that bisects the lake.

“Be a Coffee Bean”: Tega Cay aims to be first Coffee Bean City, but it doesn’t have anything to do with brewing coffee

TEGA CAY, S.C. (WBTV) - There is something brewing in the City of Tega Cay.City leaders are hoping to promote positivity amongst the community with a program known as ‘Be a Coffee Bean.’City Manager of Tega Cay Charlie Funderburk says, like many people, city employees got into a funk during 2020.“It really just kind of messed up our culture,” Funderburk said. “People were being very short with one another as they were communicating, things like that.”Funderburk says he was looki...

TEGA CAY, S.C. (WBTV) - There is something brewing in the City of Tega Cay.

City leaders are hoping to promote positivity amongst the community with a program known as ‘Be a Coffee Bean.’

City Manager of Tega Cay Charlie Funderburk says, like many people, city employees got into a funk during 2020.

“It really just kind of messed up our culture,” Funderburk said. “People were being very short with one another as they were communicating, things like that.”

Funderburk says he was looking for leadership inspiration when he came across a book co-written by motivational speaker and author Damon West. The book is called “The Coffee Bean.”

According to a video on Damon West’s website, he came across the concept of being a coffee bean on his way to prison to serve a 65-year-sentence for crimes he committed related to his drug addiction. He compares prison to a boiling pot of hot water.

“The story of the coffee bean that he [West] tells is that life is like a pot of boiling hot water,” Funderburk said. “When you throw a carrot in the pot of hot water, what happens to it? It becomes soft. It becomes weak. When you throw an egg into that same boiling pot of hot water, it becomes hard like a hard-boiled egg. What happens when you throw a coffee bean into a pot of boiling hot water? Well, the water becomes coffee. So, the smallest of the three objects that you add into that pot of boiling water, it changes its environment instead of letting its environment change it.”

Funderburk was so moved by the concept, he decided to introduce it to city employees in early June of 2021. He says he noticed a change in their positivity and attitudes.

“People who ordinarily have come in, go into their office, do their work, and go home, now, they’re like ‘hey, how are you doing’, ‘how’s your family’, ‘how was your evening’. They are generally just happier,” Funderburk said.

So, city leaders took it a step further and challenged city employees to spread the ‘be a coffee bean’ message to people in the community. They gave each employee five bracelets that read: ‘Be a Coffee Bean’. Each time a coffee bean is identified, the person is recognized on the City of Tega Cay’s Facebook page.

“That coffee bean person is looking to make a difference, looking to make things better,” Funderburk said. “If that becomes the new norm, just think about how much better we will be.”

Now, Tega Cay’s Parks and Recreation Director Joey Blethen is working to bring the program to Tega Cay’s youth leagues. Each season, about 1,800 kids from ages three to 14 are involved in youth sports within the city.

Blethen says instilling the ‘Be a Coffee Bean’ program will start with parents and coaches. Each will be given a positivity pledge to sign. The letter ensures parents and coaches are putting positivity and sportsmanship first.

“The coach kind of sets the tone for everyone,” Blethen explained. “If the coach is upset at a call, that’s going to permeate to the kids, to the parents, and everything.”

Athletes will get involved by nominating coffee beans on their teams. The coffee bean players will be put into a drawing for a grand prize which is where local businesses come into play.

The owners of Abbott’s Frozen Custard of Tega Cay, Todd and Kathy Nettnin, wanted to get involved as soon as they read the story of ‘The Coffee Bean’.

“There’s so much negativity in the world today and the whole coffee bean story is really just about celebrating good,” Todd Nettnin said. “Even the littlest thing that somebody does to be a better person.”

The Nettnins will incentivize being a coffee bean athlete by offering prizes, including free frozen custard, to players who show positivity.

“We’re setting the building blocks by saying, ‘Hey, just be a good person’,” Blethen said.

Funderburk says Tega Cay’s school principals are also welcoming the idea. He says there will be coffee bean clubs in schools from elementary to high school come the fall. He hopes the concept will create a positive ripple effect on everyone it touches.

“I want us to go from coffee bean city, to coffee bean county, to coffee bean state,” Funderburk said.

Copyright 2021 WBTV. All rights reserved.

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