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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Tega Cay, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Tega Cay:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Tega Cay, SC

Before the Panthers, another massive York County sports site fell through. Here’s why.

Just south of the state line, plans for a new world class sports complex excited a city. A developer talked of elite athletes who would train there, apartments and businesses that would sprout up. The project promised to transform the city.Then, it didn’t happen.No, it wasn’t the Carolina Panthers headquarters in Rock Hill. It would have been Game On in Tega Cay.As Rock Hill awaits what will come next a...

Just south of the state line, plans for a new world class sports complex excited a city. A developer talked of elite athletes who would train there, apartments and businesses that would sprout up. The project promised to transform the city.

Then, it didn’t happen.

No, it wasn’t the Carolina Panthers headquarters in Rock Hill. It would have been Game On in Tega Cay.

As Rock Hill awaits what will come next after the Panthers stopped construction and terminated its contract, it’s neighbor across the Catawba River is completing a re-vision for a major development that never came. There now are new plans for the Tega Cay property, which officials can finalize Monday night.

The plans won’t include what would have been called Game On.

“Everything was kind of centered around that private recreational facility that was going to be Game On,” said Charlie Funderburk, city manager in Tega Cay. “For various reasons, the private facility kind of fell through.”

In 2016, Tega Cay annexed and rezoned property between Stonecrest Boulevard and Dam Road. Mooresville, N.C.-based Game On Development had plans for a two-level sports facility, 14-screen theater, 150-room hotel and four-level parking garage. Park, medical, office, retail and residential spaces were proposed. About half of the roughly 78 acres would need annexation into the city.

The $40-$50 million development would replace a salvage yard not far from the Walmart along S.C. 160. The sports part of Game On would have an Olympic size and resort-style pools and a 35,000-square-foot fitness center. Plus eight basketball courts, four multipurpose fields, bowling, and both indoor and outdoor tennis.

The developer envisioned apartments above commercial uses, where elite athletes could stay while training for Olympic swimming or other high-level competition. Any resident in Game On, or anywhere in the city, could buy memberships to access the sports facilities. The facility was projected to be ready by 2025.

The sports complex, and a hotel, would be part of the first-phase.

In mid-2018, property developers got city approval for 167 townhomes on 22 acres. It was the first residential piece of Game On, with grading set to start that August. All of the property at the time was either purchased by, or under contract with, the developer.

By November 2019 grading and stormwater work was underway, with new home construction eyed for spring 2020. Planning continued for the sports portion.

Yet signs emerged the sports piece may not happen. Final building plans for the sports piece were never submitted.

Work started on the Trinity townhomes. Then, a leadership shift within the development team for Game On led to less focus on the sports piece.

“(The Game On developer) came to us and said look, this isn’t going to happen,” Funderburk said. “We probably saw it coming in about 2019, but really 2020 — the tail end of 2020 — is when we started having those conversations with the primary (developer) as far as, what do you want to see?”

One member of the Game On developer leadership group declined to comment at length Friday on what led to the failure of the sports complex, other than to say the city, and Funderburk in particular, were excellent to work with and did what was in the city’s power to bring the project to life.

George Sheppard was mayor of Tega Cay when the idea of Game On was first mentioned.

“Ultimately, the money wasn’t there to make it happen,” Sheppard said. “There were promises made that couldn’t have been kept, financially.”

Sheppard had concerns, and voted those concerns, when his full council didn’t see full financing details related to the project. Sheppard voted against initial annexation and rezoning, and against putting townhomes in first, though both happened.

“Commercial is where the city would make its money,” Sheppard said.

David O’Neal became mayor after Sheppard, in 2018. There were negotiations between the city and developer in his time, but O’Neal said the city held its ground.

“The Game On developer wanted too many concessions,” he said. “We tried to formulate something that wouldn’t give away so much, but after the Panthers released the deal they struck with the state, city, county, school board — we knew we would never achieve the numbers they wanted, and we relayed it to them.”

A important as commercial growth for the city is, O’Neal said it shouldn’t come at all costs.

“My last words to the developer was, ‘I’d rather leave it be undeveloped land where the deer and the antelope can play’ than approve the 30 years of tax abatement they were looking for,” O’Neal said.

In Tega Cay, the Fort Mill School District is a much larger taxing entity than the city. There were efforts by the city to have the district help with a new tax increment financing district. It never materialized.

Such districts have been used for major redevelopment projects in Rock Hill and elsewhere. A taxing body, in this case the school district, would forego some future tax revenue in an area to pay for public infrastructure in that area. The vision is, as the area grows, it generates far more revenue -- through higher tax values and collections -- that ultimately serves the city and school district.

There were other interactions between Game On and the school board. Anticipated 2020 closure of the former Leroy Springs Recreation Complex in Fort Mill, and loss of pools there, prompted the school district to include $9.9 million for an aquatics center in a $226 million bond package in 2015. Two proposals came in for the project.

One was a partnership between Game On and SwimMAC Charlotte for the pools planned in Tega Cay. The other brought the Town of Fort Mill and Upper Palmetto YMCA together to add to the Leroy Springs site. Ultimately the school district, town, YMCA and Leroy Springs & Co. reached a deal that added new school district pools at the now town-owned Fort Mill YMCA at the Complex.

Apart from scale, there may appear to be similarities between Game On and the estimated $2 billion Panthers development in Rock Hill.

Tega Cay leaders downplay them.

“I don’t think so, no,” Funderburk said. “I think it’s completely, completely different.”

Game On was capped at 400,000 square feet of commercial space. The Panthers site was large enough to move state officials to fast track a new interchange off I-77.

“You’re not talking about an NFL training center and all the other things that are coming with it,” Funderburk said of Game On.

Sheppard sees Panthers owner David Tepper as a shrewd businessman who is methodical and strategic. Available funding was an issue for Game On, while a lack of money wouldn’t appear to be an issue for Tepper who ranks among the world’s wealthiest sports team owners at a net worth of almost $17 billion, per a Forbes list earlier this year.

The problem in Rock Hill is about the securing of bonds issued by the city for public infrastructure projects. The Panthers group stopped construction and ended its construction contract with the city claiming the city didn’t meet financial commitments. Rock Hill leaders insist they abided by the rules of the deal.

Sheppard, who for years took to calling the Tega Cay project “Game Off,” doesn’t compare the two.

“I don’t see the same things with Tega Cay,” he said.

Yet O’Neal said it was the Panthers public incentive agreement that at least in part led to requests by the Game On developer for tax incentives. At that point the difference in project scope became an issue.

“They wanted a deal similar to the Panthers, except they weren’t the Panthers,” O’Neal said.

What is similar between the Rock Hill property today and the Tega Cay site since Game On fizzled is uncertainty on what will now happen to the properties.

On Monday night, Tega Cay City Council likely will take a major step toward answering their city’s part of that question.

This story was originally published May 16, 2022 2:00 AM.

Riversweep, Indian Land Fall Festival, LWCC: The latest as Ian impacts weekend plans

Weather expected from what hit Florida on Wednesday as Hurricane Ian continues to impact the Rock Hill region.One of Lake Wylie’s largest community events is canceled in anticipation. The Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation posted Wednesday that Riversweep is canceled. The event was set for Saturday. The decision was made due to uncert...

Weather expected from what hit Florida on Wednesday as Hurricane Ian continues to impact the Rock Hill region.

One of Lake Wylie’s largest community events is canceled in anticipation. The Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation posted Wednesday that Riversweep is canceled. The event was set for Saturday. The decision was made due to uncertainty with flooding from the hurricane that neared landfall in Florida on Wednesday morning.

Indian Land Fall Festival, a hugely attended gathering in the Lancaster County panhandle each year, is postponed. Organizers posted Wednesday the event wouldn’t happen this weekend. They later posted new dates for the festival, on Oct. 15-16. Music, movies and food trucks also are being scheduled for Oct. 14.

“Due to the inclement weather heading our way this weekend we feel our community’s safety is our top priority,” organizers posted online on Wednesday.

Lake Wylie Children’s Charity also planned its fall fundraiser for this weekend. That event dates back decades, and can draw tens of thousands of dollars to support families facing pediatric cancer or other hardship. So far the noon to 6 p.m. event Sunday on the lawn at Papa Doc’s Shore Club remains a go. If it’s just rain and no major storm impact, the event will go on with some activities held inside the restaurant.

Major storm implications could change that plan.

“The community and Papa Doc’s have been so supportive to help us raise funds for our kids at our largest fundraising event of the year,” organizers posted Wednesday. “Most importantly, please join us as we pray for those in the path of lan.”

Riversweep is the largest single-day public cleanup event in the region. It involves boat captains, volunteers and others who gather at marinas, parks, along waterways or at public access areas to remove debris from lakes, streams and the Catawba River. Unpredictable water rise in lakes and creeks across the basin caused the cancelation.

“We are extremely disappointed to cancel this annual community-wide stewardship event that brings together so many organizations, partners, and volunteers and sheds awareness on the important mission of clean waterways in the Catawba-Wateree River Basin,” reads an announcement from the foundation.

Riversweep now runs from headwaters in the North Carolina mountains at Lake James, through the Charlotte region and south to areas below Lake Wateree. About 60 spots were signed on for the event.

In Lake Wylie, Riversweep efforts date back decades. More than a dozen Lake Wylie sites set to participate this year included Buster Boyd Access Area in Lake Wylie, Ebenezer Park in Rock Hill, the Lake Wylie Dam in Fort Mill, Nivens Creek Landing in Tega Cay and River Hills, Tega Cay and other marinas.

Even more spots on the northern part of Lake Wylie include spots in Belmont and Cramerton, North Carolina. More than half a dozen sites just below Wylie include the Anne Springs Close Greenway in Fort Mill, Riverwalk in Rock Hill and the Lindsay Pettus Greenway in Lancaster County. More than a half dozen more sites are in Great Falls and surrounding areas.

Even in past years when Riversweep was limited largely to volunteer sites on Lake Wylie, the event consistenly collected tens of thousands of pounds of litter, debris and trash. Along with canceling Riversweep, Ian could further impact waterways if it creates flooding or near flooding conditions. Large storms often can pull natural debris or even pieces of dock loose and relocate them downstream.

As of 11 a.m. Wednesday, Duke Energy has lakes all along the Catawba basin slightly to more than a foot below their target levels. Lakes can be lowered ahead of significant rainfall expected from hurricanes or tropical storms. Duke’s protocols and ability to use the entire river system together limits the threat of flooding along Lake Wylie and other reservoirs.

This story was originally published September 28, 2022 11:30 AM.

Sheriff takes aim at Rock Hill comments after Tega Cay, York County, reach inmate suit settlement

Tega Cay will be dropped from a York County legal case over jail inmates, while the sheriff takes aim at comments made by Rock Hill officials.Late last month, York County and the sheriff filed suit against the cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay. The suit states Fort Mill, Clover and York agreed to pay the county $73 per day per inmate to house municipal arrest inmates, but Rock Hill and Tega Cay didn’t.On Monday night, after more than an hour in closed session to discuss the inmates and other legal issues, the York County C...

Tega Cay will be dropped from a York County legal case over jail inmates, while the sheriff takes aim at comments made by Rock Hill officials.

Late last month, York County and the sheriff filed suit against the cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay. The suit states Fort Mill, Clover and York agreed to pay the county $73 per day per inmate to house municipal arrest inmates, but Rock Hill and Tega Cay didn’t.

On Monday night, after more than an hour in closed session to discuss the inmates and other legal issues, the York County Council voted to approve an intergovernmental agreement with Tega Cay and take steps to remove the city from litigation.

County attorney Michael Kendree said the agreement is between the county, Sheriff’s Office and City of Tega Cay. The city will pay money owed prior to being dropped from litigation, Kendree confirmd. Further details weren’t discussed publicly when council voted to approved the deal.

“This is an agreement specifying the per diem costs for municipal inmates that are housed with York County for municipal violations,” Kendree said.

Charlie Funderburk, city manager for Tega Cay, told The Rock Hill Herald Wednesday his council approved the agreement in a special meeting last week. Tega Cay received notice Tuesday the county approved its part of the deal.

“We’ve been working through an agreement with the sheriff and county really ever since they sent us the first one in December, on and off,” he said. “Just trying to see if we could find some middle ground that both sides agree with.”

Funderburk said work is underway to release Tega Cay from the lawsuit.

“We never got served with a lawsuit,” Funderburk said. “Obviously we know it was filed, but it never got served. So they’re amending that.”

Funderburk said his city is comfortable with the new deal and is ready to move forward.

“Glad to put that in our rear view mirror and get back to the business at hand,” he said.

On Tuesday, an attorney for the York County Sheriff’s Office sent a statement from Sheriff Kevin Tolson and background information on the litigation, to The Herald.

In it, Tolson took issue with the idea there isn’t justification for how fees were calculated. Here’s the statement:

Normally, I do not comment on matters in litigation; however, in this case, I feel that I need to address some of Rock Hill’s statements regarding municipal inmates that are housed at the York County Detention Center. The City and the County have a fundamental disagreement about which entity is responsible for the care of inmates with municipal charges and we are using the legal system to work through this disagreement. Our justice system is well equipped to resolve disagreements of this nature.

I have no issues with the City’s statement regarding their position, but I am baffled by the City stating that there was, “no adequate justification... for how the fee was calculated.” Over the past year, I have spent too many hours to count talking with City leaders about this issue, the fee calculation and why it was changed. I do not understand why the City stated that the fee was changed, “with no provision of information or background on how the fee was calculated,” because I sent an email to Mayor Gettys and City Manager David Vehaun on January 5, 2022 that clearly laid out how the new fee was calculated. I am attaching that email to this statement so that the people can see for themselves the information that was provided to the City.

I make this statement at this time to be clear to the citizens of York County that I did everything in my power to resolve the disagreement regarding the care of municipal inmates without resorting to the courts for resolution.

Tolison’s statement is in response to one offered by Rock Hill last month. It states:

Today, York County took the unfortunate step of filing a lawsuit against municipalities in York County. The County is completely aware of the City of Rock Hill position that these fees have historically been paid voluntarily as they are not required under state law.

The City does not entirely object to voluntarily paying a fee; however, the City only plans to do so under a fairly negotiated agreement. Just over one year ago, York County unilaterally and arbitrarily announced it was raising the daily fees for boarding prisoners to almost $100 per prisoner per day, essentially doubling the fee. This was done with no provision of information or background on how the fee was calculated.

Many of the municipalities in York County announced they would not pay these fees. Several months later the County provided new information to the municipalities that reduced these arbitrary fees by approximately 20%. However, again no adequate justification was provided for how the fee was calculated.

In the spirit of cooperation and good faith, the City has paid all fees associated with the dispute. The fee has been voluntarily paid, even though there is no law requiring the City to do so. In fact, the state statute requires the County to board all municipal prisoners with no provision for fees....

Beyond paying these fees, City of Rock Hill taxpayers already fund operations related to the Sheriff’s Office through County property taxes paid to the tune of approximately $7.9 million a year. Surely, Rock Hill residents have paid their fair share to York County for these services.

The City has made several offers on how we would be comfortable moving forward under a fairly negotiated agreement; however, York County has refused to negotiate. We look forward to providing additional information before the court and vigorously defending the residents of Rock Hill all of whom are also residents of York County.

A January email from Tolson to Rock Hill city officials provided by the sheriff’s office mentioned a proposed intergovernmental agreement with a $73-per-day, per-inmate rate effective Jan. 1.

That cost is up from almost $43 at the end of last year. A separate, same-day email from Tolson to city and county officials notes the new rate was calculated for inmates with municipal (city or town) charges only, not inmates with municipal and general sessions charges which is how municipalities were charged previously.

People in York County are shifting. One place in particular just keeps getting bigger.

In a year, Fort Mill added more residents than all but two other cities or towns in South Carolina.The U.S. Census Bureau released new population estimates Thursday for municipalities across the nation. The figures show estimates as of July 1, 2021, compared to that same date in 2020. Of the 270 incorporated places in South Carolina, most of the ones in York and surrounding counties grew.The estimated 27,991 residents in Fort Mill in mid-2021 is up 2,736 peop...

In a year, Fort Mill added more residents than all but two other cities or towns in South Carolina.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new population estimates Thursday for municipalities across the nation. The figures show estimates as of July 1, 2021, compared to that same date in 2020. Of the 270 incorporated places in South Carolina, most of the ones in York and surrounding counties grew.

The estimated 27,991 residents in Fort Mill in mid-2021 is up 2,736 people in a year. Those estimates don’t include the vast number of people with Fort Mill addresses who aren’t in town limits, notably Baxter and the Carowinds corridor. Unincorporated, or township, numbers were released with the recent data.

Only the slightly larger municipalities of Bluffton (3,457 resident increase) and Greer (3,068) grew by more people than Fort Mill. If the number of new residents in Fort Mill alone were its own town, it would rank in the top 100 in the state (No. 95).

In a year, York County grew by roughly the population of Clover. Yet much of the county’s population lives in unincorporated areas like Lake Wylie, or beyond the outskirts of Rock Hill and York.

Of the 288,595 estimated York County residents in mid-2021, about 54% live outside the nine cities and towns.

Rock Hill hasn’t grown in recent years at the rate Fort Mill has, but it’s still the largest population center in the county. The 74,102 estimated Rock Hill residents in mid-2021 is almost 26% of the county total. Yet the city population is down 55 residents in a year.

Fort Mill accounts for almost 10% of the York County population. Tega Cay is next at almost 5%.

Trends are visible dating back more than a decade. The 56% of York County residents who lived outside city or town limits in 2010 isn’t far off the 54% current mark. Yet a greater percentage of county residents each year come from the areas nearest Interstate 77 and the North Carolina border with Charlotte.

Rock Hill had 29% of the county population in 2010, 3% more than it does now. Fort Mill had less than 5%, about half what it has now. Tega Cay had about 3% of the county total, a little more than half what it has now.

Since 2010 the county has grown by more than 62,000 residents. Or, almost as many people as lived in Rock Hill in 2010. It’s a growth rate of almost 28%.

In that span, Fort Mill and Tega Cay combine to account for 41,269 more residents, or about two-thirds of that countywide growth rate. Rock Hill has grown by 7,948 residents since 2010.

While they aren’t reflected in the new data, years of new homebuilding trends in the area show similar growth in two other areas that border Charlotte. Lake Wylie in York County and Indian Land in Lancaster County remain some of the highest-growth areas in the region.

Both Lake Wylie and Indian Land are unincorporated areas. Their growth is reflected in countywide totals for their respective counties.

Here’s a look at one-year growth for municipalities in York, Lancaster and Chester counties:

Here’s what $90 million just bought across York and Lancaster counties

Almost two dozen September property sales in York and Lancaster counties topped the $1 million mark. They include a hotel, medical buildings, and land for new home development.Combined, according to county land records, those sales totaled about $90 million.Here’s a look at the biggest land and property sales for the month:? The avid hotel in Fort Mill near Carowinds sold Sept. 12 for $12.5 million....

Almost two dozen September property sales in York and Lancaster counties topped the $1 million mark. They include a hotel, medical buildings, and land for new home development.

Combined, according to county land records, those sales totaled about $90 million.

Here’s a look at the biggest land and property sales for the month:

? The avid hotel in Fort Mill near Carowinds sold Sept. 12 for $12.5 million. Maya Mooresville bought the five-story, more than 46,000-square-foot hotel, which was built last year, from Kismet Fort Mill. The 2-acre property is beside and once was part of the McDonald’s property on Carowinds Boulevard, just south of the North Carolina line at I-77.

? VTR HC Riverwalk of Chicago bought the HarborChase of Riverwalk property in Rock Hill on Sept. 15 for more than $11.5 million. The two-story senior residence facility built in 2019 sits on almost 6 acres at 749 Dunkins Ferry Road. The facility is more than 79,000 square feet.

? Grahamcap Commerce of Birmingham, Ala., bought the 120,000-square-foot warehouse at 2690 Commerce Dr. in Rock Hill. The Sept. 23 sale for $10 million includes almost 8 acres. An industrial building sits near the intersection of Galleria Boulevard and Red River Road, just east of I-77.

? Shea Homes Carolina bought an almost 50-acre property at 1645 Gardendale Road in Tega Cay on Sept. 8 for more than $9.1 million. The property is zoned for residential use.

? Three Herlong Avenue commercial properties in Rock Hill sold Sept. 15 for almost $8.8 million. SCG-Millwood Plantation out of Hilton Head now owns them. The properties combine for more than 28,000 square feet of neighborhood shopping center space at 295, 303 and 305 Herlong.

? The almost 15,000-square-foot Walgreens at 2000 Celanese Road in Rock Hill sold Sept. 23 for $6.2 million. The 2-acre property now belongs to 227 J out of Verona, New Jersey.

? A mix of seven commercial and residential properties at about 55 acres sold Sept. 16 for almost $5.7 million. Taylor Morrison of Carolinas bought the sites near Gold Hill Road and Hubert Graham Way in Tega Cay. The two largest properties, at more than 20 acres each, are across Gold Hill from Tega Cay Elementary School, near Windhaven.

? A combined 48 properties sold Sept. 2 for almost $5.2 million. New home builder D.R. Horton owns the phase two Abrial Ridge lots in York. The subdivision is just west of York Comprehensive High School, south of S.C. 5.

? Property at 113 Evergreen Road in Lake Wylie sold Sept. 16 for almost $3.5 million. The 3,300-square-foot commercial garage was built earlier this year. Big Sky Investments out of Cincinnati is the new owner.

? Two residential parcels, one with an almost 5,000-square-foot home, on Wood Duck Point in Lake Wylie sold Sept. 21 for $1.8 million. The Allison Creek Estates lakefront property is on Big Allison Creek.

? A 3,800-square-foot home on Cove Point Lane in Tega Cay sold Sept. 9 for almost $1.8 million.

? Two commercial properties at almost 5 combined acres on S.C. 274 in Lake Wylie sold Sept. 14 for $1.7 million. Boing Us Holdco of Charlotte owns the sites off the highway beside Mill Creek, beside Walmart. Previously listed as The Meld, the site includes a planned retail center set to open early next year.

? An almost 3,000-square-foot home on Johnson Road in Lake Wylie, part of Catawba Crest, sold Sept. 7 for $1.5 million.

? Almost 43 acres of residential property in Fort Mill sold Sept. 7 for $1.5 million. New Old Whitetail Land Co. owns the property not far from Nivens Creek and the Catawba River, below the Fort Mill dam. The property is south of Gardenia Street, east of Solandra Way and north of Forsythia Lane.

? Almost 39 acres at 6872 Waxhaw Road in Lancaster County sold Sept. 20 for $1.5 million. The property has a 1,200-square-foot home on it built in 1951. Blackhall Acquisitions out of Waxhaw, North Carolina is the new owner.

? A more than 2,400-square-foot home on more than 16 acres along Oak Park Road in Rock Hill sold Sept. 13 for almost $1.3 million.

? Commercial property at 231 Herlong Ave., suite 101 in Rock Hill sold Sept. 9 for almost $1.3 million. The 4,800-square-foot medical office building and rehab center built in 1997 now belongs to Shukan Management.

? An almost 2,800-square-foot home on Old Clay Hill Road in Lake Wylie sold Sept. 13 for $1.2 million.

? Property at 3175 Montreaux Valley Dr. in Lancaster County sold Sept. 8 for almost $1.2 million. The Indian Land site is an acre.

? An almost 4,200-square-foot home on Quail Trail Lane in Catawba Crest, in Lake Wylie, sold Sept. 29 for $1.1 million.

? A 5,100-square-foot home on Mountain Laurel Way in Rock Hill sold Sept. 29 for $1.1 million.

This story was originally published October 4, 2022 8:16 AM.

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