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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Walterboro, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Walterboro:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Walterboro, SC

Colleton County School Board addresses safety concerns

Colleton County school leaders focused on community concerns about classroom safety for much of Tuesday night’s school board meeting.WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Colleton County school leaders focused on community concerns about classroom safety for much of Tuesday night’s school board meeting.The concerns come after one student was arrested and two othe...

Colleton County school leaders focused on community concerns about classroom safety for much of Tuesday night’s school board meeting.

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Colleton County school leaders focused on community concerns about classroom safety for much of Tuesday night’s school board meeting.

The concerns come after one student was arrested and two others taken into custody at Colleton County High School last week after a fight and the discovery of a handgun in a student’s car.

District leaders laid out specific numbers on disciplinary action for the school year and how the schools are handling recent events.

There have been 3,123 total referrals given out from teachers and staff since the start of this school year. District Safety and Security Coordinator Wesley McNeely said level one offenses, such as having a cell phone out in class or not following the dress code, have increased since last year.

“It’s not just a Colleton County or Lowcountry, or even South Carolina issue. It’s a problem nationwide,” McNeely said.

Of the total number of referrals, 57% are Level 1. Level 2 offenses, which pertain to disruptive behavior that can be harmful to one’s self or others, accounted for 41.1%. The remaining 1.8% are Level 3 offenses, which include violent behavior that requires law enforcement.

This school year, the district has handed out 57 Level 3 offenses.

School Board member Daryl Erwin asked how many guns on the district’s campuses are enough to say that the district has “a serious problem.” The answer he received was “one.” When he then asked how many the district has seen this school year, he was told, “two.”

“So then we have a serious problem in our school district,” Erwin said.

Superintendent Dr. Vallerie Cave says they are working diligently with area law enforcement including the State Law Enforcement Division on these issues. She says the violence in the schools could come from gang-related violence happening within the community.

“It has a tendency to permeate the school building and that’s unfortunate because discipline is a responsibility of everyone,” Cave said.

“Personally, I think, as some of the children move through, they have less and less respect for authority,” McNeely said. “And the way they want to do things is that they think they are adults and they do what they want when they want.”

To parents who worry about sending their students to school, Cave invited them to come into the schools and help.

“Help us combat the problem,” she said. “Come in and help us. Volunteer. Come help us patrol the hall.”

McNeely says they are doing the best they can.

“Of course, this is our community and they think we’re not as safe as we should be, but in actuality, we are a lot safer than people around us are,” he said.

McNeely says hearings are scheduled for those students involved in the Nov. 21 incident. There, the district will decide what disciplinary action they will take at the school level for the students who were arrested.

Parents can read more about the district’s policies, including its Student Code of Conduct on the district’s website.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

TJ’s Braiding Studio Grand Opening

TJ’s Braiding Studio’s grand opening was Saturday, Nov. 12. Walterboro native Toni Jones, also known as TJ, is the owner of this new endeavor. Jones and her team are ready to offer a luxurious experience and top-of-the-line hair service to residents of Walterboro and the surrounding communities.Jones is a devoted mother to four daughters Zania, Liberty, Milan, and Kaylee. She enjoys every free moment with her girls who mean the world to her. Jones continually aspires to be the best version of herself not only for herself b...

TJ’s Braiding Studio’s grand opening was Saturday, Nov. 12. Walterboro native Toni Jones, also known as TJ, is the owner of this new endeavor. Jones and her team are ready to offer a luxurious experience and top-of-the-line hair service to residents of Walterboro and the surrounding communities.

Jones is a devoted mother to four daughters Zania, Liberty, Milan, and Kaylee. She enjoys every free moment with her girls who mean the world to her. Jones continually aspires to be the best version of herself not only for herself but also for her daughters. Jones is no stranger to adversity as well. Jones lost both her parents in less than four years. Her father, Tony Sampson, passed away in 2019. Later her mother, Barbara Jones-Strader, passed away in 2020 amid the pandemic. “I want people to look at me and say that no matter what I went through or how many losses I took I never gave up!” said Jones.

Jones recalled being a young girl when her love for hair began. She has been self-taught from around the age of nine and has been braiding ever since. She shared how in the beginning she would braid her little cousin’s hair and then later braided her friends’ hair in middle school. Jones took a slight detour and began a career in healthcare as a CNA upon graduation. However, hair was still her lifelong passion and she never allowed it to fall by the wayside. With her love and compassion for others, she has served in both fields.

In 2018, Jones started to focus more of her attention on her clients and branded herself as “TJ On the Slayyy” working with children. In 2020, she joined “The Glam Trap” for a short while and later transitioned to working independently again in 2021. Now she wants to offer her services to all ages.

Jones believes wholeheartedly in teamwork and is looking for others to join her in reaching the dream together so everyone can reach their goals. She is currently looking for braiders, stylists, barbers, locticians, and MUAs (make-up artists) to join her so she can help them expand their skills and give them the platform to flourish.

“I want to inspire those young girls who love to braid just like I did when I was a kid. Even upcoming braiders who are scared to bet on themselves. I’m here to tell you to take that leap of faith and bet on yourself. But most importantly I want my babies to grow up and say I want to be a boss just like my mommy!” said Jones.

Jones is grateful for all the support from her family, friends, and clients over the years and for many more years to come. For more information call Jones at 843-909-4519 or email toni2012jones@gmail.com.

Why You (Yes, YOU) Need A PCP

As you probably know by now, I practice family medicine. What you may not know is that family medicine is considered primary care, or more commonly, your primary doctor. Some of you reading this may think to yourself, that’s weird, my primary is an internist. Let me explain. Primary care is basically the primary provider you go to for care. This includes family medicine, internal medicine and pediatrics. If you still aren’t sure if you have a primary care provider (PCP), here are two questions to ask yourself:• Did yo...

As you probably know by now, I practice family medicine. What you may not know is that family medicine is considered primary care, or more commonly, your primary doctor. Some of you reading this may think to yourself, that’s weird, my primary is an internist. Let me explain. Primary care is basically the primary provider you go to for care. This includes family medicine, internal medicine and pediatrics. If you still aren’t sure if you have a primary care provider (PCP), here are two questions to ask yourself:

• Did you have a physical or check up in the past year?

• Was that physical or check up scheduled ahead of time (not in Urgent Care or an emergency room)?

If you answered yes to both of those, good job. If you didn’t, let me tell you why we need to change that. Every office, clinic, hospital you go to is part of a healthcare system, just like the schools in town are part of the school system. Now, would you send a kid to high school before elementary school? No? So why go to the hospital when you have a cold?

Just like the school system, the healthcare system is designed to be used a certain way. It’s designed for you to have a doctor that knows all about you. It’s designed for you to have a place to go for check ups and anything that’s not an emergency. It’s designed for you to have a PCP.

But what if you never got sick in the first place? What if we could prevent it? That’s what primary care is all about. I enjoy all of my patients, but I really love doing physicals for teenagers and young adults. Why? Because that’s when I can help them build habits that keep them from needing diabetes or high blood pressure medicine in the future. And it’s an even better feeling when I get to help my older patients look and feel young by helping them keep their health in order. But it’s not just me, it’s a known fact that folks with good primary care are healthier than those that don’t have a PCP. Convinced yet?

If you need a PCP, just call your local family medicine or internal medicine offices and ask if they are taking new patients. If you have one and haven’t seen them yet this year, make an appointment. Either way, follow me on Facebook

(House Calls with Dr. B), TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter (@housecallsdrb) for more tips on living your best life. I’d also love to hear your questions for future articles!

Dr. Lance Braye, MD, MPH is a family medicine physician who practices in Prosperity, SC. He grew up in Walterboro, SC and attended Colleton County High School where he participated in band, football, and track. He received his undergraduate degree in Biology from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, before attending the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). While at MUSC, he took a year away from medical school to earn his Masters in Public Health in Health Behaviors and Health Promotion. After graduating from MUSC, he completed his residency in Family Medicine at Lawrence Family Medicine Residency in Lawrence, MA with a concentration in Health Systems Leadership. Professionally, Dr. Braye is interested in finding ways to improve the health system for all, addiction treatment, and nutrition. Personally, he loves sports, gardening, cooking, and spending time with his wife, Paris, and their cat, Obi.

Florie Bell Davis Stephens

Florie Bell Davis StephensTime well-spent reflects a life well-lived. Someday, you and I will be mere legends. All that matters is whether we did what we could with the life that was given to us by the Master.On July 5, 1927, the world was blessed to receive a precious angel, the youngest of nine children, born to James “Jimmy” Rogers and Ella Julia Sanders Davis of Walterboro, South Carolina. Mrs. Florie Bell Davis Stephens surely made the most of her years. Known to many as “Floribel,” she was a loving...

Florie Bell Davis Stephens

Time well-spent reflects a life well-lived. Someday, you and I will be mere legends. All that matters is whether we did what we could with the life that was given to us by the Master.

On July 5, 1927, the world was blessed to receive a precious angel, the youngest of nine children, born to James “Jimmy” Rogers and Ella Julia Sanders Davis of Walterboro, South Carolina. Mrs. Florie Bell Davis Stephens surely made the most of her years. Known to many as “Floribel,” she was a loving person who always shared a beautiful smile and something humorous to draw a laugh from others. She was educated in the public schools at St. Peters and Colleton Training Schools in Walterboro. Shortly thereafter, she relocated to Asbury Park, New Jersey where she was employed as a nursing assistant for many years in a local hospital.

Floribel was married to the late Roy Stephens of Asbury Park, New Jersey. Eventually, she moved back to her hometown and remained here until she answered the Master’s call to “enter into the joy of the Lord” on the evening of Friday, November 4, 2022 at Pruitt Health Care. She was a member of St. Peters CME Church in Walterboro.

Floribel loved to serve the Lord, sing, and write. She was very fashionable, well-endowed with beauty and grace, and loved the finer things in life. However, she would candidly let you know what was on her mind, for it was never a dull moment around her! It is known among many that she truly loved, adored, and was exceptionally proud of her family. She fondly appreciated her nephew, Herman Garfield (Anna) Bright, who was her family representative.

Floribel’s parents and her siblings preceded her in death: James “Jimmy” Rogers and Ella Julia Sanders Davis; John Wesley “Wheeler” (Josephine) Davis, Eugene “Shine” (Essie Mae) Davis, Jimmy Rogers (Elizabeth) Davis, Wilson (Elizabeth) Davis, Nathaniel (Helen) Davis, and Jessierine (Herbert) Bright. Left to cherish fond memories of her, are numerous nieces, nephews, and other relatives. She will truly be missed by her devoted family, friends, and members of the community. In conclusion, Aunt Floribel did it “Her” way!

Celebration of Life and Homegoing Services were held at Faith Church in Walterboro on Friday, November 11, 2022, with the interment at Brick Barn Cemetery on St. Peters Road in Walterboro.

Walterboro welcomes FestiVELO XXV

The city of Walterboro hosted the unique cyclist social festival event called FestiVELO XXV Wednesday through Sunday, Nov. 9-13. FestiVELO is an annual event where cyclists can choose between 20-30 miles, 55-65 miles, or 95–105 mile routes throughout the Lowcountry. The riders covered up to 400 miles of casual riding over the course of the four days. The riders were able to pick and choose the days and distances. This year there were approximately 300 participants nationally and internationally.The participants were provided bre...

The city of Walterboro hosted the unique cyclist social festival event called FestiVELO XXV Wednesday through Sunday, Nov. 9-13. FestiVELO is an annual event where cyclists can choose between 20-30 miles, 55-65 miles, or 95–105 mile routes throughout the Lowcountry. The riders covered up to 400 miles of casual riding over the course of the four days. The riders were able to pick and choose the days and distances. This year there were approximately 300 participants nationally and internationally.

The participants were provided breakfast, lunch, and themed dinners daily during their stay. On “Wednesday Wined Down” wine and cheese were offered; Thursday had a “Chocolate Obsession Garden”, Friday and Saturday were an oyster roast, with live music on Friday, and a popular DJ on Saturday.

Riders stay within local accommodations or set up camp within walking distance of the event center. First Baptist Church provided space for outdoor camping and the county offered the use of the local Civic Center for indoor camping for two nights during the tropical storm Nicole. The FestiVELO event itself was housed at Colleton County Museum and Farmers Market downtown.

Historically, the bike event started out as a small group of friends who wanted to work off some extra calories from a holiday meal and the first ride took place Thanksgiving weekend in 1998 in the Charleston area. The following year, the ride was called “Pedal for the Pooches” to benefit the SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and was a one-day event on John’s Island.

The group continued to grow and developed a mission to support various bicycle causes. It also underwent several name changes along with locations throughout the greater Charleston area. In 2004, the group began to use “FestiVELO” within its name. “FestiVELO” is a merge of “festival” and “VELO” which means bicycle in French. Since then, the event has hosted participants from 34 states and eight foreign countries.

The founder of FestiVELO, Charles Fox, is a passionate bike rider who seeks out events that provide opportunities to meet new friends and offer experiences that bring enjoyment to those who participate. The entire Fox family, who owns Fox Music Company, has been directly involved with the event each year, volunteering an untold number of hours. The event has expanded over 25 years to include over 100 leaders and countless volunteers. An event of this scale has attracted a wide variety of talented volunteers that have really given the event momentum as it continues to flourish each year. New volunteers are always welcome to join to help as well.

David Cole, who helps with organization, management, and app development for the event specified that currently, the cycling event appeals to mostly those between the ages of 30 through the late 70s. Cole mentioned that it is unusual because it is a four-day event that starts and finishes in Walterboro. Riders can come to one place, which gives them a better chance to get to know other riders and make new friends.

The areas that are covered by the riders include the northeast towards Round O on Thursday, west across Highway 21 on Friday, south down to Bennett’s Point on Saturday, and up to Saint George on Sunday to do loops throughout the countryside while visiting some of the historical places around there and back.

Walterboro is a destination prized for its flat scenic terrain and rich historical-artistic cultural center. The flat terrain is desirable for achieving faster times and greater distances for cycling goals. Riders of a wide range of abilities and skill levels participate in the cycling event.

Cole also stated that cycling has a unique appeal, especially road cycling. This event is attractive to people that are all sizes and abilities. In 1998, he was diagnosed with a kidney disease that later led to a transplant in 2001. After standard recovery, he was able to return to cycling with ease and has continued to be an avid rider since. He also considers himself a late bloomer as an athlete. He was 40 pounds heavier in high school and college. He lost some weight while running and playing volleyball. Later he blew his knee out while playing volleyball, took up cycling instead, and has never looked back.

Cole emphasized that “If someone is considering what they can do to enhance their life, something that would give them exercise and get them outdoors and meet new friends. Then cycling is a good outlet for that. The FestiVELO is a really good event for that.” He also stated that it is also encouraged to use electronic bikes for those that feel more comfortable. Anyone can participate as a cyclist, and one does not have to be super fit or athletic to enjoy the sport.

The FestiVELO is a welcomed event that has come to Walterboro annually since 2016. Often the participants will visit restaurants, shops, and other local points of interest. Cole stated how “Walterboro has really embraced us, and we have embraced Walterboro.” Cole also said, “It’s like home for us and we like being right here in the ‘Front Porch of the Lowcountry’. It’s great cycling here and it just works quite simply.”

The next FestiVELO event is scheduled for the same week next year. For more information about this event contact Charles Fox at 843-303-3334 or Randall Bennett at 919-608-8626 or visit info@festivelo.org.

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