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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Walterboro, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Walterboro:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Walterboro, SC

Walterboro neighbors concerned about new halfway house opening in the community

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCBD) – Community members are concerned about a new ministry that is set to open in the Walterboro area.Shield Ministries, an organization that claims to help convicted sex offenders rehabilitate and re-enter society, will open its doors off Barracada Road near Highway 17-A. CCSO: Beware of ‘sextortion’ scams...

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCBD) – Community members are concerned about a new ministry that is set to open in the Walterboro area.

Shield Ministries, an organization that claims to help convicted sex offenders rehabilitate and re-enter society, will open its doors off Barracada Road near Highway 17-A.

About 50 men could be housed at the property at any given time as the first phase of their three-phase program to help the men improve their lives.

“Shield Ministries is an organization that works to help men transition from the devastation of their past into a thriving future,” explained David Truluck, executive director for Shield Ministries.

But those who live nearby say they are concerned about having sex offenders so close to their homes, children, and grandchildren.

“I’ve lived here for 35 years. I love Walterboro. I love the community,” said neighbor Lisa Langdale.

Langdale is worried about what is going in at this old church site in her rural neighborhood. “I’m just really concerned about living in the neighborhood, for our children, and living in the neighborhood even for myself,” she said.

She’s even part of a new Facebook group that has gained more than 600 followers.

“What do you say to people who maybe they live nearby, they have children or grandchildren at their house, and they’re concerned? What would you say to them,” we asked Truluck.

“Well, we have been a big asset to the community. When you look at our history, we have great relationships with law enforcement agencies,” Truluck replied.

There is also concern about Truluck, personally, because he is a registered sex offender.

“I believe the offense was committ or attempt a lewd act on a child. Do you understand why people might be concerned about an organization that you’re leading being right there in their neighborhood as well,” News 2 asked.

“I do understand why they would be concerned about that, but one of the things I would like to communicate to them is, I’ve been through the process of healing I’ve been through court-ordered counseling, which we will be providing,” he replied.

When asked if he could guarantee that none of the men in the program would bring harm to anyone in the community, Truluck said “I don’t think we could give that type of guarantee,” but cited the program’s “zero percent recidivism” rate.

A community meeting geared toward showcasing the proposal will take place Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. across from Tractor Supply on Bells Highway in Walterboro.

Leaders with Shield Ministries say they are in the process of getting the property ready to open, however, they do not have a specific opening date at this time.

Walterboro residents hope state program will revitalize historic downtown

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Walterboro has been accepted into a state program to revitalize their historic downtown area in hopes of bringing economic success to the community.Walterboro joins over 30 other communities like Beaufort, Kingstree, and Orangeburg in the Main Street South Carolina network, which aims to address issues that challenge historic commercial districts.“People who have grown up in this town have seen it gone from a very vibrant, bustling downtown that had pharmacies, restaurants, banks,&rdq...

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Walterboro has been accepted into a state program to revitalize their historic downtown area in hopes of bringing economic success to the community.

Walterboro joins over 30 other communities like Beaufort, Kingstree, and Orangeburg in the Main Street South Carolina network, which aims to address issues that challenge historic commercial districts.

“People who have grown up in this town have seen it gone from a very vibrant, bustling downtown that had pharmacies, restaurants, banks,” Scott Grooms, director of tourism and downtown development for the City of Walterboro said. “I’d love to see downtown just totally populated again with that to where people come downtown to shop and do day to day business.”

Business owners downtown say they love the area’s southern charm and small town feel but agree that some updates would bring in more business.

“I think we have incredible potential I just think we need some help in realizing what all we have,” Jessica Burdick, owner of Twig Boutique, said.

In the coming weeks, Main Street SC will come to Walterboro and bring in a research crew to find out what the city is doing right, and what they could do better, holding meetings with stakeholders, residents, and public officials to find out their vision for downtown. Then, they will assist Walterboro in coming up with strategies to achieve that vision.

“I think it’s gonna bring new business, a lot of potential for a lot of our local people for things different to do, and hopefully some beautification and some buildings that are currently empty, to fill those as well,” Heather Larson, co-owner of Colleton Day Spa, said.

Before the team arrives, the city has posted a survey asking people who live, work, and spend time in Walterboro to share what they think the most pressing issues facing downtown are, what types of businesses they would like to see, and more.

You can find that survey here. You’re encouraged to submit honest feedback about what you would like to see downtown until Jan. 25.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Colleton Co. Schools responds parent’s complaint of child’s consistent bullying

Last month, parent Brittney Husk said the district “did nothing” about her child’s bullying and now she wants to make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else.COLLETON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - The Colleton County School District responded Monday afternoon to allegations by a district parent that she has had to resort to homeschooling after bullying at her child’s middle school got worse.Last month, parent Brittney Husk said the district “did nothing” about her ...

Last month, parent Brittney Husk said the district “did nothing” about her child’s bullying and now she wants to make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

COLLETON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - The Colleton County School District responded Monday afternoon to allegations by a district parent that she has had to resort to homeschooling after bullying at her child’s middle school got worse.

Last month, parent Brittney Husk said the district “did nothing” about her child’s bullying and now she wants to make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

Husk claims her seventh grader has been severely bullied in Colleton County School District over the last three years. In the last couple weeks, she said she hit a breaking point.

“Jaiden was shoved down the staircase and that was the last straw for me,” Husk said. “...And I asked them to pull any video footage and they didn’t. I didn’t get to see anything. And I don’t know if anything was done about it.”

Husk now has resorted to homeschooling.

“I shouldn’t have to be a teacher,” Husk said. “I shouldn’t have to choose between my son’s safety and the inconvenience and I knew that I had to keep him safe and he was no longer safe being in that school.”

She claims at least six parents have come forward to her on Facebook saying their child is experiencing the same thing, with some cases even worse.

Colleton County School Superintendent Jessica Williams relayed the following statement regarding the situation:

Due to student privacy and confidentiality considerations, the District is unable to comment on any specific student matter. The district has processes and procedures to address bullying. These include restorative discussions and practices, small group sessions, individual sessions and the implementation of anti-bullying curriculum. While we have these processes and procedures in place, the district acknowledges that bullying incidents could still occur. When they do occur, these incidents are investigated, documented, and handled in accordance with local and state guidelines.

The 2022-2023 state school report card states Colleton County Middle School received an overall rating of a 30 out of 100.

“Wow,” Husk said. “That’s pretty bad.”

Out of the five elementary schools in the district, the average rating is 38.6. Colleton County High School was rated 38. Williams said parents were notified of the school’s grade through various methods, including class newsletters, school newsletters, the district website, social media, the Class DoJo parent communication system, face-to-face interactions like parent nights or signage at the school’s front office.

There have been 82 reported cases of bullying and harassment, according to the latest report. And with nearly 5,000 students enrolled, a little over a fifth of them received out-of-school suspensions.

“The whole county in general, not even just the middle school, but it’s all of them,” Husk said. “It’s the way this whole county operates. And I’m not surprised one bit that it has low ratings.”

She says it’s up to the district to discipline these repeat offenders and for the parents at home to teach them what’s right vs. wrong.

“I think that I did do the right thing, you know, keeping my son safe,” Husk said. “But I just hope no other parents have to go through this.”

Williams also released a statement on the overall scores of Colleton County High School receiving an unsatisfactory rating with a score of 38, Colleton County Middle School receiving a below-average rating with a score of 30 and the overall average rating of 38.6 for the district’s five elementary schools:

Colleton County School District has five elementary schools, one middle and one high school. Of these seven schools, Northside Elementary School increased their rating, Cottageville Elementary and Forest Hills Elementary remained the same, and Colleton County High School, Colleton County Middle School, Bells Elementary and Hendersonville Elementary regressed one level. Colleton County High School regressed by two points giving them an unsatisfactory rating while Colleton County Middle School regressed by seven points giving them a below-average rating.

The district has developed a plan to improve our overall outcomes that includes a focused data analysis process to improve instructional decisions, targeted professional development for teachers to address identified areas from our data analysis, MTSS structures, SEL support for students, and targeted professional development for principals and instructional coaches.

As for questions about safety scores including the number of in-school and out-of school suspensions and expulsions increasing since last year plus incidents involving firearms, Williams released this statement:

We acknowledge the data that is found within the Student Safety indicator on the SC School Report Card. We are working with local partners and agencies to improve our student safety indicators.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

‘We have work to do’: Community reacts to Colleton Co. Schools state report card

COLLETON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - With English, math and science scores all sitting below state level by at least 20% or more, some folks in Colleton County say their school district needs to see improvement.“We have work to do,” community member Hiram Davis said. “We have a lot of work to do.”Some places to note when looking across the report card are student absent rates, which went up by nearly 6%, and the percentage of teacher vacancies for more than 9 weeks increased by nearly 19% in comparison to last...

COLLETON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - With English, math and science scores all sitting below state level by at least 20% or more, some folks in Colleton County say their school district needs to see improvement.

“We have work to do,” community member Hiram Davis said. “We have a lot of work to do.”

Some places to note when looking across the report card are student absent rates, which went up by nearly 6%, and the percentage of teacher vacancies for more than 9 weeks increased by nearly 19% in comparison to last school year.

Davis says he’s talked with some high schoolers about why this may be.

“They feel that a lot of the stuff that’s being pushed out to them is overwhelming,” Davis said. “...Students are burned out and the teachers are burned out. And I’ve also spoken with a number of teachers that have said the same thing because these curriculums are just overwhelming.”

Additionally, the percentage of students from last year’s graduating class who are currently enrolled in a 2- or 4-year college or university decreased by roughly 2%.

About 82% of teachers returned to school two years ago, but only about 75% returned this past school year.

Across the entire report card, the only rates that are above the state average are teacher and student participation rates, which both exceed 90%.

“Education is where it starts,” Davis said. “I wouldn’t want to educate my child in a district that has that kind of report card unless I’m from here. But to come from some other place? I wouldn’t do it either.”

Regarding teacher salaries, the average has increased by roughly $3,000. However, Davis says it’s still not comparable to what neighboring districts offer.

“When you have a district, such as ours, our funds are a little bit different than a lot of the larger districts,” Davis said. “We’re not competitive... If could drive 25-30 minutes and make an additional $25,000 to $35,000, clear money, I would probably do it.”

Davis says he thinks it’s going to take another five, maybe even six years to see a drastic improvement in overall scores.

“I think we need to sit down as a group,” Davis said. “As a community. With these administrators, with the superintendent, with the curriculum coordinators and figure out where the issue is. And we need to include some students in that because, ultimately, they’re the ones that have to take this test.”

Mary Jo Fox, the coordinator of communications for Colleton County School District, acknowledged Live 5′s request for comment and says as soon as she hears from Superintendent Jessica Williams, she will pass their statement of response along.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Walterboro's Jim Brown follows in Lee Brice's footsteps, gunning for a music career

SOUTH CAROLINA (WCIV) — It’s amazing. It was already 15 years ago, I did a story on an aspiring singer/songwriter leaving for Nashville after his time as a Clemson Tigers long snapper. It worked out pretty well for that guy- Lee Brice.This week, we do the same story. A former Clemson long snapper, leaving to follow his music dreams in Nashville. Walterboro’s Jim Brown.If passion could be purveyed, Jim Brown has always found a way to do it.Walterboro's Jim Brown follows in Lee Brice's footsteps, gunning ...

SOUTH CAROLINA (WCIV) — It’s amazing. It was already 15 years ago, I did a story on an aspiring singer/songwriter leaving for Nashville after his time as a Clemson Tigers long snapper. It worked out pretty well for that guy- Lee Brice.

This week, we do the same story. A former Clemson long snapper, leaving to follow his music dreams in Nashville. Walterboro’s Jim Brown.

If passion could be purveyed, Jim Brown has always found a way to do it.

Walterboro's Jim Brown follows in Lee Brice's footsteps, gunning for a music career. (WCIV)

“I sing vocally very gritty and aggressive," said the Pinewood Prep grad.

If purpose and passion meet, Jim Brown will find a way to connect them. In his fifth year at Clemson, he was awarded a scholarship by Dabo Swinney.

The Walterboro native has a deeply rooted passion, and now, is his time to shine.

“I taught myself how to play guitar in HS after an ACL injury, bedridden for two weeks so I picked up a guitar and learned to play. When football was over, just latched on to it— all music. Singing vocals, piano, music theory, songwriting- started diving as deep as I could and it sort of got me to here," he said.

Construction consultant is the title that pays the bills for now. But Jim Brown is ready for that chord progression to take the next step. Similar to going from walk-on to scholarship player.

“I’m not trying to be the next Chris Stapleton, but I want to make music that hopefully relates to people on some level," Brown said.

Music, can always take you home. His first single is doing just that.

“The Devil and the Gavel” is his ode to the Murdaugh murders saga in his hometown of Walterboro.

“In Charleston I played a lot of gigs, covers around town and on weekends, Thursday, Friday, Saturday at Edisto Beach and Walterboro. Now, more songwriting. At the end of the day, what I want to do is release music that I have, keep playing. I know its something I’m fortunate to have, and kind of let people know this is my thing," Brown said.

He doesn’t know Lee Brice. He’s never met him. But he hopes his passion will help him follow the same path.

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