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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in Waxhaw, NC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Waxhaw:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in Waxhaw, NC

Swimming and Diving Teams Each Post Three Wins Over League Competition

LEWISBURG, Pa. -- Lauren Walsh (Fr., Shelton, Conn.), Jackson Schultz (Sr., Millersville, Md.) and Everet Andrew (So., Wilmette, Ill.) each won three individua...

LEWISBURG, Pa. -- Lauren Walsh (Fr., Shelton, Conn.), Jackson Schultz (Sr., Millersville, Md.) and Everet Andrew (So., Wilmette, Ill.) each won three individual events during a sweep by the Navy swimming and diving teams over American, Bucknell and Lafayette, Saturday afternoon at Kinney Natatorium in Lewisburg, Pa.

The Navy (6-1) women's team won 13 events to defeat American (2-5) by the score of 237-61, Bucknell (5-1) by the count of 202.5-97.5 and Lafayette (0-5) by a tally of 253-47.

In the men's meet, Navy (7-0) recorded 11 event wins to beat American (0-7), 243-45; Bucknell (5-1), 189-111; and Lafayette (2-3), 245-54.

"It was a great meet against three league opponents," said Navy women's swimming head coach John Morrison. "We are proud of the way we came out and attacked our racing. We fought through two DQs in the opening relay event (early takeoffs) and battled for wins the remainder of the first half of the meet."

"The highlight of today was the amount of racing that took place," said Navy men's swimming head coach Bill Roberts. "We were really happy with how the team performed this afternoon as we continue to prepare for upcoming meets."

Walsh posted victories in the 100 breast (1:03.92), 100 fly (56.57) and the 200 IM (2:03.37). Teammates Hannah Pratt (Jr., Fishers, Ind.) and Mackenzie Kim (Fr., Diamond Bar, Calif.) also won a pair of events during the meet. Pratt won the 200 free (1:51.34) and 100 free (51.09) races and Kim swept the one (286.70) and three-meter (295.75) diving events.

Schultz earned victories in the 100 breast (55.00), 200 breast (2:01.32) and 200 IM (1:50.41) events. Andrew matched that victory total with first-place finishes in the 200 free (1:37.47), 100 free (44.59) and 500 free (4:33.65) races.

Additional individual event winners for the Navy women's team were Jennifer Luong (So., South Riding, Va.) in the 100 back (57.60), Abbie Sullivan (Jr., Haverhill, Mass.) in the 200 fly (2:04.03), Katie Corbi (Sr., Waxhaw, N.C.) in the 50 free (23.94), Gabi Baldwin (Jr., Lake Elms, Minn.) in the 200 back (2:03.66) and Maddie Koutavas (Fr., St. John's, Fla.) in the 200 breast (2:20.49).

"Lauren had three very impressive swims," said Morrison, "as did Hannah in her two wins and Katie in the 50 free. Our divers also had a strong meet."

Completing the list of winners for the Navy men was Blakeman Shaw (So., Coral Gables, Fla.), one-meter diving (288.70); Zach Stump (Fr., Westerville, Ohio), 200 back (1:51.30); Jonah Harm (Jr., Placerville, Calif.), 100 fly (48.27) and Anthony Sciulli (Fr., Powell, Ohio), three-meter diving (303.65).

The Navy men's swimmers will next compete Nov. 16-18 at Purdue, the women's swimmers will take to the waters again Nov. 17-19 at Ohio State and the divers are slated to compete again Nov. 17-19 at West Virginia.

Fear of PFAS Disposal Costs Looms Over Firefighting Foam Switch

Airports and other places that rely on PFAS-enabled foams to fight fires should start to prepare to manage the wastes they’ll generate by switching to non-PFAS alternatives, attorneys and consultants say.Congress ordered the Pentagon to release requirements for firefighting foams made without per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) by the end of January.Once new PFAS-free foams that meet the military’s standards are available, that will open the door to military facilities along with oil refineries...

Airports and other places that rely on PFAS-enabled foams to fight fires should start to prepare to manage the wastes they’ll generate by switching to non-PFAS alternatives, attorneys and consultants say.

Congress ordered the Pentagon to release requirements for firefighting foams made without per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) by the end of January.

Once new PFAS-free foams that meet the military’s standards are available, that will open the door to military facilities along with oil refineries, airports, fire departments, and other private entities replacing their existing stocks of the PFAS-based foam, or AFFF (aqueous film-forming foam).

But swapping the PFAS-based fire suppressants at just one facility can generate tens of thousands of gallons of waste, said Matthew Magnuson, a chemist with the Environmental Protection Agency’s research office. Pipes, valves, and other equipment that’s too contaminated to clean also may have to be replaced, and old AFFF stocks will have to be disposed of.

The 2020 National Defense Authorization Act requires the EPA to update PFAS-waste disposal and destruction guidance by December 2023. Facilities will have to comply with state requirements that may be based on this guidance. At this stage, it’s still not entirely clear which foams and waste disposal systems will work best.

Even so, companies, airports, and other facilities should take steps now, said Corey Theriault, principal water engineer with Arcadis, which began working on switching foams in 2017 in Australia.

Huge Disposal Cost

They should start by finding out how many gallons of AFFF they have and where, what fire trucks or other mobile equipment contains the foam, and how many buildings the foam is piped into in case of fire, Theriault said.

“Some of these larger conglomerates have more pieces and parts out there other than they’re aware of,” he said. “The disposal cost is huge.”

Neither Theriault nor disposal firms interviewed were willing to discuss specific costs, saying the estimate varies based on each site’s need.

But Gregory R. Sharpe, the fire chief at the Waxhaw Fire Department, in Waxhaw, N.C., said he paid about about $14,000 to replace 200 gallons of AFFF with a smaller, but sufficient amount of an alternative PFAS-free foam made by GreenFire, which also made arrangements with the Battelle Memorial Institute to destroy old AFFF.

“We had just gotten new equipment,” so the department didn’t have to worry about additional costs from cleaning out or replacing old equipment that had stored the AFFF, Sharpe said.

Companies also need to figure out what potential liabilities they’re comfortable with, Theriault said.

PFAS-disposal guidance the EPA released in 2020 identified landfills, waste incineration, and deep well injection as possible options. But, it also described limitations and unknowns including the possibility that some technologies might release PFAS.

Local and state laws also may restrict PFAS-containing wastes from incinerators or landfills, said Steve McKnight, strategy and government adviser for 374Water, which developed a technology that cleans water and destroys PFAS.

Factory Shutdowns

Companies have to think through how they’ll operate during the foam transition process, said Cynthia AM Stroman, an environmental practice partner with King & Spalding LLP.

“When you transition it’s not just switching out the foam. You’ve got to clean out tanks, pipes, and valves,” she said.

“You have to have fire protection if the plant is running,” so some industries will have to shut operations down while they transition, she said. “It takes a fair amount of planning.”

Firefighting foam transition guidance from the American Petroleum Institute underscores the need to plan.

The EPA’s research office continues to analyze different technologies that could be used to address AFFF-replacement and other PFAS wastes and ways to improve them, said EPA’s Magnuson and Max Krause, an engineer who also works with the agency’s research office.

The Department of Defense, which has relied on AFFF for decades, and the Water Research Foundation also are funding extensive research on a range of technologies, according to information from the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council.

Destroying PFAS in Liquids

Technologies that deal with PFAS in water and other liquids are the most advanced.

Water utilities have already been using granular activated carbon (GAC), ion exchange resin, and reverse osmosis to remove PFAS and other contaminants from drinking water. Those technologies don’t destroy PFAS, the Interstate Council said. The PFAS that the filters, membranes, or other material remove still must be disposed or destroyed.

But tests of one technology, supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), showed it could destroy more than 99% of PFAS in liquids, according to EPA scientists.

The technology emerged from Duke University research that began in 2013 with seed money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, said Marc Deshusses, a civil and environmental engineering professor at Duke. The foundation sought technologies that would help developing countries destroy fecal matter contaminating water supplies, he said.

SWCO worked not only for human wastes but also for other contaminants including PFAS, said Deshusses who cofounded a company called 374Water to commercialize a version of the technology, AirSCWO.

Very hot water—374 degrees Celsius (705.2 degrees Fahrenheit)—and pressure breaks up PFAS and other chemicals, destroying them in the process, he said.

The AFFF-related wastes that AirSCWO can treat include the fire-fighting foam, contaminated water from cleaning equipment, and storage tanks containing runoff collected from airport hangar and other fires where the foam was used, Deshusses said.

‘Happy the AFFF is Gone’

Battelle’s version of SWCO, called the Annihilator, destroys the PFAS in those liquids and other material, like GAC filters that can be made into a slurry, said Amy Dindal, Battelle’s PFAS Program Manager.

Battelle used the Annihilator in September to destroy old AFFF the Waxhaw Fire Department had stockpiled.

Having heard the PFAS in AFFF were linked with cancer and other health problems, “we didn’t want this hanging around the fire station,” Sharpe, the fire chief, said.

The new foams work for gas station, railroad accidents, and other fires Waxhaw deals with, Sharpe said. And his firefighting crew is " happy the AFFF is gone,” he said.

Market Hesitancy

Other than SCWO, most PFAS-destruction technologies are still moving from the design and testing period toward potential use phases, said EPA’s Krause.

“I don’t know that that we would see them next year, but certainly within the next few years you would be seeing these,” he said.

Market dynamics are delaying deployment of new technologies, he said.

Fire departments, airports, and other parties that want to start switching foams want to use a technology with a proven track record, Krause said. “They don’t want to be the first ones to dip their toes in.”

Meanwhile vendors may be convinced their system could work, but aren’t fully ramping up due to market hesitancy, he said.

Neighbors pushing for safety measures after numerous crashes on Waxhaw road

Neighbors count seven single-car crashes since Summer 2021, with two of them happening this month.People living near Pine Oak Road in Waxhaw describe a portion of it as a dangerous hairpin curve.WAXHAW, N.C. (WBTV) - People living near Pine Oak Road in Waxhaw describe a portion of it as a dangerous hairpin curve.The road off of Waxhaw- Marvin Road has a 35 mile per hour speed limit, but they say drivers are not following it and are caught off guard when the road curves.They count seven single-car crashes since l...

Neighbors count seven single-car crashes since Summer 2021, with two of them happening this month.

People living near Pine Oak Road in Waxhaw describe a portion of it as a dangerous hairpin curve.

WAXHAW, N.C. (WBTV) - People living near Pine Oak Road in Waxhaw describe a portion of it as a dangerous hairpin curve.

The road off of Waxhaw- Marvin Road has a 35 mile per hour speed limit, but they say drivers are not following it and are caught off guard when the road curves.

They count seven single-car crashes since last summer, with two of them happening this month.

Neighbors tell WBTV they want to see guard rails around the curve and maybe even speed humps.

Home security footage paints a frightening picture of repeated crashes outside of Kevin Flynn’s home, which is adjacent to Pine Oak Drive.

“It’s a bit terrifying to be honest with you,” he said.

He has lived there for the past ten years and says he has grown accustomed to the sound of screeching tires from his backyard.

“We’ve already had one car go through our fence,” Flynn said. “If the kids are around and someone is out of control, there are no trees left to stop someone from coming into our yard at this point.”

Flynn’s next-door neighbor Ryan Barkley has been trying to find a solution, but he says because it’s a state road, local officials can’t do much about it.

The North Carolina Department of Transportation did install a warning sign and chevrons, but the neighbors say it did not do the trick in preventing crashes.

“Unfortunately about two weeks after they went up, someone ran into them,” Barkley said. “It just seems like people aren’t paying attention and the signs aren’t making the biggest difference we’re hoping for.”

A spokesperson for NCDOT sent a statement to WBTV reading:

“The department’s traffic services unit had previously installed a curve warning sign and chevrons (arrows) to alert drivers to the curve at this location. Prior to your inquiry, we had submitted a work order to replace any damaged or missing chevrons, and to cut back the vegetation around the curve warning sign. We will investigate further to see if any additional improvements are warranted.”

Barkley says more safety measures have to be put in place soon.

“I’m most worried about my children and that one day we’re going to walk out on a dead body in one of those car accidents,” he said.

We also spoke to a couple who has lived on Pine Oak Road for 35 years and say this curve has always caused crashes.

They said in the past people would veer off the curve and land in a cornfield, but that field is now replaced with a housing development.

According to an NCDOT records request by WBTV, in the last 10 years, there have been 14 crashes reported, and nine reported in the last five years.

The data shows that five were injury crashes and nine were property damage only crashes.

But a spokesperson added that “many traffic crashes go unreported for a variety of reasons, and this report simply provides a summary of all crashes on record that occurred at that location.”

The neighbors also reached out to Senator Burr’s office for assistance in their push for guard rails.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Union County seeing rapid growth, leading to new development

Cuthbertson Road is just one area of Waxhaw that is seeing significant change, which is concerning some longtime residents.WAXHAW, N.C. — Data shows more than 150,000 people have moved to Union County in North Carolina over the past three decades, and county leaders said there are no signs that the trend will slow down anytime soon.And rapid growth often means new development.“We’re one of the fastest-growing regions in the states," Union County planning director Lee Jenson said. “Developers ...

Cuthbertson Road is just one area of Waxhaw that is seeing significant change, which is concerning some longtime residents.

WAXHAW, N.C. — Data shows more than 150,000 people have moved to Union County in North Carolina over the past three decades, and county leaders said there are no signs that the trend will slow down anytime soon.

And rapid growth often means new development.

“We’re one of the fastest-growing regions in the states," Union County planning director Lee Jenson said. “Developers reach out to us all the time."

County leaders point to three main reasons developers continue to pick this area.

“Good work-life balance; we have great schools, and we have low taxes," Jenson said.

Those are the same reasons Tony Palmer moved from Cleveland with his family seven years ago.

“It looked like home; it felt like home, and we loved where we were -- kind of rural but enough to do," Palmer shared.

But that rural feeling is starting to change in some parts of the county.

One such development is on Cuthbertson Road where trees once stood tall until it was rezoned in late 2020. Soon, 360 age-restricted units and 93 townhomes will be built on a 235-acre plot.

"When you start taking down the trees, there goes the rural part," Palmer said.

He hopes the growth slows down a bit.

"The growth is going faster than the infrastructure," Palmer explained.

And when new developments come, infrastructure is known to suffer. With narrow roads and traffic bound to increase, some residents are worried about this new development causing more problems for an already struggling area.

“In the evenings, there’s not many cars, and it’s not an issue but if you’re doing 45 to 50 mph, and the roads are super narrow," Palmer said. "Every single home I guarantee you has at least two children, so, between new drivers and things like that, it’s tough."

County leaders said there will be a new left-turn lane on Cuthbertson Road to help alleviate traffic.

"And then eventually, the state DOT will widen Highway 16," Jenson shared.

Union County recently rolled out a 2050 Comprehensive Plan to discuss how they plan to handle the new development. County leaders said, while they encourage growth, they know there's a limit.

“Growth should not occur out in some of the unincorporated parts of the county, so our new plan reflects that," Jenson said.

Residents said they don't hate the growth, but they are hopeful county leaders can build roads and storm sewers fast enough to keep up with the growing demand.

WCNC Charlotte is part of seven major media companies and other local institutions producing I Can’t Afford to Live Here, a collaborative reporting project focused on solutions to the affordable housing crisis in Charlotte. It is a project of the Charlotte Journalism Collaborative, which is supported by the Local Media Project, an initiative launched by the Solutions Journalism Network with support from the Knight Foundation to strengthen and reinvigorate local media ecosystems. See all of our reporting at charlottejournalism.org.

'An opportunity for independence' | Waxhaw group supports veterans with dogs tailored for service

Project 2 Heal aims at cutting down how long veterans have to wait for service dogs.WAXHAW, N.C. — Editor's note: While nothing graphic is shared in this article, the topic of veteran suicide is discussed briefly. The end of this article features links to resources if you or a loved one are in crisis and need help.They look like little fuzzballs now, but the Labrador puppies wiggling and playing in their pens at Project 2 Hea...

Project 2 Heal aims at cutting down how long veterans have to wait for service dogs.

WAXHAW, N.C. — Editor's note: While nothing graphic is shared in this article, the topic of veteran suicide is discussed briefly. The end of this article features links to resources if you or a loved one are in crisis and need help.

They look like little fuzzballs now, but the Labrador puppies wiggling and playing in their pens at Project 2 Heal headquarters could soon grow into lifelines for veterans in need.

The Waxhaw-based organization, which breeds puppies specifically for service dog organizations, started as just a hobby for Charlie Petrizzo and his wife in 2005 and grew into its non-profit status in 2011.

Petrizzo said the group's main goal is to help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by delivering service-reliable puppies to organizations that can train them for important emotional and physical support, hopefully cutting down on the wait times for these types of animals.

"A service dog reduces those very symptoms that can lead a veteran to suicidal ideation," Petrizzo said. "So that's why they're important for veterans with PTSD, but also for veterans with loss of limb, they provide an opportunity for independence through mobility."

According to a 2021 Department of Veterans Affairs study, the suicide rate among veterans rose nearly 36% from 2001 to 2019. The last year of data in the report was 2019 and shows more than 6,200 veterans took their own lives that year.

Petrizzo said Project 2 Heal fills a void for service dog training programs, which can't always draw from shelters. He said while dogs from shelters can make incredible family pets, they might not always meet service-specific needs.

"Most organizations don't have a breeding program, and so this is what leads to the very long wait for service dogs, especially for our veterans today, who are waiting for years," Petrizzo said.

Anyone can support the Project 2 Heal cause, which is accepting donations of money, purchases from its supply wish list, and new volunteers.

If you or a loved one are facing thoughts of suicide or self-harm, there is help readily available. You can call Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988 and then press 1 for veterans resources or chat with them online. There are also resources in North Carolina available here and in South Carolina available here.

Veterans and their loved ones can also chat directly with the Veterans Crisis Line online, or by texting 838255.

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