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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in West Ashley, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in West Ashley:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Winter 2023 weather forecast for Charleston, SC

We know the question on your mind, Charlestonians — when’s it going to get cold? Thanks to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center, we know what temperatures and precipitation trends to expect in our city for December, January, and February.While exact weather conditions typically can’t be predicted more than a week in advance, here’s a seasona...

We know the question on your mind, Charlestonians — when’s it going to get cold? Thanks to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center, we know what temperatures and precipitation trends to expect in our city for December, January, and February.

While exact weather conditions typically can’t be predicted more than a week in advance, here’s a seasonal outlook to help you prepare for what winter may bring.

Reminder: The first day of winter is on Wednesday, Dec. 21.

Think warm. This winter, Charleston has a 50-60% chance of temperatures being higher than normal.

Expect slightly less to about average precipitation. Charleston has a 40-50% chance of seeing below-normal rainfall this winter.

Drought conditions are expected to develop this season.

Typically in Charleston, December’s temperatures fluctuate between an average low of 49.and an average high of 60., which we may experience again this season.

If you’re a warm weather enthusiast, this month’s average relative humidity is 78%, making it the most humid month. Pro tip: December has an average daily maximum UV index of 4, so don’t slack on the sunscreen.

Don’t bask in the warm(er) temps for too long: January would be the time to pull out that puffer jacket. With an average high of 57° and low of 44.4°, January is recognized as the coldest month.

It’s also the month with the least rainfall, so bundle up and head to an oyster roast at Pearlz Oyster Bar in West Ashley — we know there’s no shortage of roasts this time of year.

Good news: You’ve made it to the last month of winter. Historically, average temperatures fluctuate between 60.4° and 47.7° during February in the Holy City. This month often sees 10.8 rainfall days, which we might see again this year, so be sure to have that raincoat handy.

Here Are 2022’s Eater Awards Winners for the Carolinas

TodayToday we’re excited to announce the winners of the 2022 Eater Awards, celebrating just a few of the new restaurants that have made a major impact on the Carolinas dining scene. Across North and South Carolina, chefs and restauranteurs were eager to dive into delayed projects due to the restraints from the COVID-19 pandemic. It seemed like a wave of new spots opened across the states and brought an updated interest in the scene. From Filipino fare in A...

TodayToday we’re excited to announce the winners of the 2022 Eater Awards, celebrating just a few of the new restaurants that have made a major impact on the Carolinas dining scene. Across North and South Carolina, chefs and restauranteurs were eager to dive into delayed projects due to the restraints from the COVID-19 pandemic. It seemed like a wave of new spots opened across the states and brought an updated interest in the scene. From Filipino fare in Asheville, North Carolina, to Puerto Rican barbecue in Charleston, South Carolina, there were exciting ideas and menus in unexpected places.

Please join us in celebrating this year’s incredible group of winners. Without further ado, here they are.

Chef Silver Iocovozzi set out to introduce Asheville to the food they grew up with in North Carolina and the Philippines, and Neng Jr.’s (701 Haywood Road, Asheville) was born after months of anticipation.

Iocovozzi’s menu comes from their mother, Marissa Cousler, and their Filipino heritage. Plates are always rotating, based on what’s available and the whim of the kitchen. Some nights you might find a deconstructed lobster special or supple sweetbreads inihaw with bok choy or beefy eggrolls credited to a recipe from “mom.” Always order the seasonal fruit dish if it’s on the menu — perfectly ripe fruits come with a snappy dipping sauce that highlights each bite.

The vibrant red dining room at the West Asheville restaurant feels like an embrace from your effortlessly cool best friend — the staff is genuinely welcoming (seriously, you’ll want to follow them all on Instagram after you leave). A warm smokiness emanates from the kitchen, and ‘90s pop hits play overhead in the 17-seat dining room. It’s an intimate space perfect to highlight the thoughtful menu.

“Americans are familiar with Italian food, Mexican food, Chinese food,” Iocovozzi told Eater in a previous interview, “Filipino food is not only new to Asheville, but it has not hit that mainstream avenue even in bigger cities. It has been getting more attention and exposure the last six or so years. I think the moment is now, and I’m excited to do it here, in my town.” — Erin Perkins

At least once a week, a potential customer turns on their heels after reading the overhead menu at Cheeni Indian Food Emporium (1141 Falls River Avenue, Raleigh) and walks out. Owner Preeti Waas knows why, because they often ask her: “Where’s the chicken tikka masala?”

But Waas is undeterred. Cheeni — which looks across its Raleigh, North Carolina, shopping center parking lot into an Ace Hardware store — isn’t meant to be a classic American-adapted Indian restaurant. In a way, it isn’t a restaurant at all. And that’s what makes it so remarkable.

Part all-day cafe and part community hub, Cheeni offers an alternate, more complex vision for restaurants as a third space. A small but growing market boasts everything from cookbooks to pints of masala chai ice cream. Waas — a former culinary professor — teaches classes and welcomes guest chefs in her stately demonstration kitchen in the adjoining room, which has also hosted events such as a Diwali party and a book tour.

Cheeni focuses on lighter, snackable items during the day, with the tiffin section of the menu offering everything from spiraling, heavily seasoned masala fries to the springy rice-lentil dosa waffle with sambhar. At night, large plates reign, especially the ginger and green chili-rubbed, tandoor oven-cooked Hariyali whole fish, and braised Bengali roast chicken. That makes it unlike anything else available in the region, but pared with Waas’ overall concept, it’s earned national distinction — Eric Ginsburg

Many people say they want to create a neighborhood restaurant, but husband-and-wife team Daniel “Dano” and Bethany Heinze nailed it on their first attempt with Vern’s (41 Bogard Street, Charleston). Nestled in the mostly residential area of Cannonbourough/Elliotborough, the American bistro pulls from the couple's strengths, with Bethany on the adventurous wine list and Dano in the kitchen. Dano was previously the chef de cuisine at former Charleston institution McCrady’s, and Bethany ran the bar before they departed for Los Angeles in 2016 to work with famed restaurateurs Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo. They returned to open Vern’s.

The menu draws from Dano’s work with hyper-local produce at McCrady’s, ingredient-based cooking in California, and travels through Europe with Bethany. Dishes include perfectly roast chicken in a brown butter jus or bouncy charred sourdough with allium butter.

Long-time Lowcountry residents have remarked that Vern’s feels like the beginning days of legendary Charleston restaurant FIG (232 Meeting Street, Charleston), which isn’t a punch against FIG now, but means Vern’s is executing James Beard-worthy food with impeccable service — but the hordes of tourists haven’t quite found it yet. — Erin Perkins

After years on the food truck and food hall scene, Charleston was fondly familiar with chef Thai Phi’s Vietnamese cuisine, but no one expected that the permanent location of Pink Bellies (595 King Street, Charleston) would be such a vibe.

Phi worked with Thomas & Denzinger Architects to create layer upon layer of undulating surfaces for light to bounce off, which creates an underwater effect once the sun goes down. Pinks, blues, purples, and hints of orange bounce around the room as customers clink glasses and slurp garlic noodle bowls.

Phi previously told Eater, “I really love Japanese architecture and James Turrell’s art installations. Momofuku Toronto and Tartine Manufactory SF were huge influences. Both spaces seamlessly showcase the craftsmanship that goes into the food with their open kitchens. And both have really thoughtful usage of lighting throughout their dining rooms. This space feels more representative of the Saigon that I know, where modern architecture lives alongside historical French buildings in a tropical climate.”

With such stunning interiors, it’s always a party at Pink Bellies. — Erin Perkins

Pitmaster Hector Garate wanted to join the new wave of smoked meat aficionados putting their unique cultural spin on what is typically considered American barbecue. What started as a hobby, smoking brisket for his family, became pop-up Palmira Barbecue and is now set to be a brick-and-mortar establishment (2366 Ashley River Road, Charleston). Garate pulls the best bits of flavors and techniques from Texas, North Carolina, and his native home Puerto Rico to create his menu of juicy beef cheeks, smoky pulled pork, and rich barbacoa.

Palmira started as a brewery pop-up highlighting Garate’s partnership with heritage hog farmer Marvin Ross of Peculiar Pig. The popularity of the barbecue led to a residency at food hall Port of Call (99 Market Street, Charleston), but now Garate has gone out on his own and hopes to have a permanent home for Palmira next March in West Ashley. The pitmaster promises more sides and specials at the new space. “I’m pretty sure everything’s gonna evolve and evolve and evolve,” says Garate, “Because just this past year, we evolved so much from the beginning.” — Erin Perkins

SCDNR awarded $1.5 million to restore West Ashley tidal marsh

SCDNR NewsCHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C.Last week, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) was awarded $1.5 million to work with partners and volunteers in the Charleston area to restore seven acres of degraded salt marsh in a historically important area. The project will unfold over four years and use volunteers to plant salt marsh grasses and construct oyster reefs through SCDNR’s South Carolina Oyster Recycling and Enhancement (SCORE) Program."We’re ecstatic to receive fun...

SCDNR News

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C.

Last week, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) was awarded $1.5 million to work with partners and volunteers in the Charleston area to restore seven acres of degraded salt marsh in a historically important area. The project will unfold over four years and use volunteers to plant salt marsh grasses and construct oyster reefs through SCDNR’s South Carolina Oyster Recycling and Enhancement (SCORE) Program.

"We’re ecstatic to receive funding for this project," said Michael Hodges, SCDNR shellfish biologist and lead on the project. "We’re excited that we will get to involve so many volunteers and partners in the project’s implementation. This will be a unique project, using novel, nature-based solutions to restore the degraded tidal marsh in this historically significant part of the Lowcountry."

Granted by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation through the National Coastal Resilience Fund, the award is one of eight funded across the country and represents a continuation of federally funded work on Old Towne Creek in West Ashley. Phase one of the project, led by the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), involved developing engineering and design plans for coastal marshes in West Ashley. A team led by Dr. Joel E. Kostka, Professor and Associate Chair for Research in the Schools of Biological Sciences and Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at GT, will lead post-restoration monitoring and quantify habitat improvements as well as collaborate with SCDNR to train volunteers and citizen scientists. Other partners in this phase of the project will include Robinson Design Engineers and the South Carolina Aquarium.

"This project is a win-win for the Charleston area as it will restore critical wildlife habitat while strengthening the resilience of the coastline to damage from storms and erosion made worse by climate change," said Dr. Kostka. "We at Georgia Tech are excited to participate in the project, in particular to leverage science to develop metrics and improve strategies that will ensure the success of nature-based restoration activities across the U.S."

The restoration site is in what was formerly Maryville, a small town with an important role in Charleston’s history. Chartered and settled in 1886, Maryville was one of the area’s most prominent settlement communities – self-sustaining, all-Black communities that offered the region’s formerly enslaved population safer places to buy land, raise families, and pursue farming or trades in the Jim Crow-era South.

Despite later annexation by the city of Charleston and rapid development of surrounding West Ashley, the area is still known to some locals – including descendants of the town’s founders – as Maryville.

Old Towne Creek is the tidal waterway that connects this area to the nearby Ashley River. In 1670, it saw the first English settlers arrive and establish ‘Charles Towne’ on its banks. Later, the fishermen of Maryville plied its waters for crab, oysters and fish. Today, the creek is popular among kayakers and birdwatchers. But like many urban waterways, Old Towne Creek and its surrounding marshes have degraded over time, particularly after a severe drought in 2012 and another salt marsh dieback event in 2016. Researchers have found that the salt marsh within the project area has not recovered naturally like other areas with similar conditions.

The recent $1.5 million in funding will allow for the restoration and monitoring of seven acres of degraded salt marsh through community-based restoration efforts. Members of the community and the Ashleyville-Maryville Neighborhood Association, who initially noticed that the marsh vegetation was dying back, participated in the initial site assessment and will now be engaged as volunteers in the restoration.

SCDNR biologists have been constructing ‘living shorelines’ – shorelines made of natural materials – for two decades, primarily using recycled oyster shells. These shells attract young oysters, which settle on the hard materials and collectively grow into reef structures that filter waterways, provide habitat for fish and buffer shorelines from erosion.

Please click here to sign up to receive updates about marsh restoration volunteer events.

State-of-the-art dental clinic opens in MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion

A state-of-the-art dental and oral health center has become the 22nd specialty in the MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion, a sign of the site’s stunning evolution. The pavilion opened in the former Citadel Mall in late December 2019, a month before the first diagnosed case of COVID in the U.S. – not exactly ideal timing.But the pavilion has thrived despite that, seeing 64,000 patients l...

A state-of-the-art dental and oral health center has become the 22nd specialty in the MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion, a sign of the site’s stunning evolution. The pavilion opened in the former Citadel Mall in late December 2019, a month before the first diagnosed case of COVID in the U.S. – not exactly ideal timing.

But the pavilion has thrived despite that, seeing 64,000 patients last year alone. The addition of the dental clinic brings the expertise of the Medical University of South Carolina’s James. B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine to the most populous part of Charleston.

“This is such an example of farsightedness,” James B. Edwards’ widow, Ann, said at the ribbon cutting.

Charleston’s mayor, John Tecklenburg, agreed. “This is where the customer base is. And although I certainly love and encourage folks to come downtown and enjoy all the things we have there, the concept of bringing our services to the citizens of West Ashley- that’s what this overall center is all about,” he said. “I think you'll be very successful.”

The clinic has four treatment rooms, on-site imaging and a full-time dentist on site, with MUSC faculty members who specialize in dental medicine coming to see patients as well. The dean of the dental school, Sarandeep Huja, DDS, Ph.D., said the clinic will focus on patients’ needs and the needs of the collaborative services dictated by existing MUSC Health patients.

“In addition to outstanding dental care, eventually we'll have all specialties and we'll have all levels of care – faculty, residents, our students, and it's really important for our students to experiences akin to what they would in private practice.”

Paul Davis, DMD and a member of the MUSC Board of Trustees, spoke of the foresight that led to the clinic’s creation. “Today's ceremony represents a milestone that began with a vision from Dr. Huja and his team, a vision that has been shared and supported by Dr. Cole and Dr. Cawley and MUSC Health,” he said, referring to MUSC President David Cole, M.D., and MUSC Health CEO Patrick Cawley, M.D.

“This vision highlights the importance of oral health as it relates to overall health and wellbeing,” Davis said.

Cole focused on the efforts that helped make that vision a reality. “It's an honor to be able to lead so many talented and dedicated people that are working hard to make a difference in people's lives. There's just one example, you know, so those are words from the heart. Thank you for what you do.”

Board chairman James Lemon, DMD, was also on hand for the ribbon cutting ceremony, as were Gene Hong, M.D., chief physician executive for MUSC Health and Lisa Saladin, PT, Ph.D., executive vice president of Academic Affairs and provost.

Huja said that while the West Ashley dental clinic is the first one not on MUSC’s downtown campus, and this growth will continue. And it will serve as a symbol of what’s possible for patients. “Why is this clinic important? The connection between systemic and oral health is epitomized in this integrated model of care, which MUSC will offer here at West Ashley Medical Pavilion.”

Ann Edwards said the clinic brings a much-needed option of dental expertise backed by an academic medical center to people who live in West Ashley. “It’s just wonderful that you have come to them. And that is so important. Thank you, each and every one who made it possible.”

To make an appointment at the MUSC Health West Ashley Medical Pavilion’s dental clinic, call 843-876-9267.

Cities of N.Charleston and Charleston continue legal battle of annexed acre in West Ashley

West Ashley, SC (WCIV) — The battle continues over a plot of land in West Ashley. The City of North Charleston is going head to head with the City of Charleston over the annexation of one acre of land in West Ashley.This started in 2017 when North Charleston annexed the acre of land. The City of Charleston said annexation was illegal and included a portion of historic ground. But, in 2018, a judge ruled the City of Charleston could not sue, but the City of North Charleston did not have the right to jump over Charleston for this ...

West Ashley, SC (WCIV) — The battle continues over a plot of land in West Ashley. The City of North Charleston is going head to head with the City of Charleston over the annexation of one acre of land in West Ashley.

This started in 2017 when North Charleston annexed the acre of land. The City of Charleston said annexation was illegal and included a portion of historic ground. But, in 2018, a judge ruled the City of Charleston could not sue, but the City of North Charleston did not have the right to jump over Charleston for this land.

Both cities went to the appeals court on Tuesday to fight that decision.

North Charleston said they annexed the acre because it was given to the city.

"We did not take any trust property by annexation. We didn't take any City of Charleston property by annexation," said Derek Van Raalte, attorney for North Charleston.

But, the City of Charleston said that the land grab included a piece of a 100-foot strip of land over which the City of Charleston has jurisdiction.

That land is a part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

"The City of Charleston and the property put an affidavit for a land surveyor. (The surveyor) attested the annexation included 62 or 64 feet of the national trust property, " said George Trenholm Walker, attorney for National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The City of North Charleston said they never received information that was part of the National trust.

"The City of North Charleston never received title to an inch or a fraction of an inch of the national trust land," said Van Raalte.

The City of Charleston, however, said that to annex that one acre, the city of North Charleston crossed over their land.

According to South Carolina law, that is not allowed; a judge in 2018 ruled the City of North Charleston did not have the right to jump over Charleston's land.

"This is an instance where a municipality went over the borders of another municipality and two parcels of a municipality to annex an acre," said Walker.

But North Charleston said the acre was adjacent to the property they owned. The city of Charleston said this move could lead to issues in the future.

"If Charleston is precluded from challenging an annexation that jumps its borders, it sets out a precedent that opens pandora's box," said Frances Cantwell, the City of Charleston's attorney.

The judges did not decide on Tuesday.

The City of Charleston did not release a new statement, and the city of North Charleston did not respond to our request for comment.

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