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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in Wingate, NC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in Wingate:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in Wingate, NC

Wingate School of Pharmacy’s Taylor goes above and beyond, wins statewide award

HENDERSONVILLE — Pharmacist Shawn Taylor’s healthcare philosophy sounds simple enough: provide the best possible health care to every patient regardless of their ability to pay. But putting that principle into practice is anything but easy, which is why Dr. Taylor’s successful efforts, both in the mountains of North Carolina and in Honduras, helped earn her the Ambulatory Care Pharmacist of the Year Award.Reserved for “a pharmacist with immense moral character, good citizenship, and high professional ideals who...

HENDERSONVILLE — Pharmacist Shawn Taylor’s healthcare philosophy sounds simple enough: provide the best possible health care to every patient regardless of their ability to pay. But putting that principle into practice is anything but easy, which is why Dr. Taylor’s successful efforts, both in the mountains of North Carolina and in Honduras, helped earn her the Ambulatory Care Pharmacist of the Year Award.

Reserved for “a pharmacist with immense moral character, good citizenship, and high professional ideals who has made significant contributions to their area of practice,” the award is given by the North Carolina Association of Pharmacists.

Michelle Chaplin, assistant dean of pharmacy on Wingate’s Hendersonville campus, says the organization, which has more than 2,000 members, couldn’t have made a better choice.

“Shawn is truly deserving of this award,” she says. “She has worked to build a practice serving majority low-income patients in Western North Carolina. She has worked to expand her skill set to meet the needs of this community and, in her success, has also paved the way for additional pharmacy positions to be created and filled.

“She’s also obtained grants and worked to establish accredited services to further the reach of her care. Shawn continues to publish much of her work and inspires student pharmacists by involving them significantly in scholarship and her practice site.”

In her Foundations of Pharmacy Practice and Community Health Engagement class, Taylor helps students understand that no matter how much they know about the medications they’re dispensing, they won’t be successful unless they can communicate well with their patients and help them overcome some daunting hurdles.“I tell my students that 50 percent of the job is figuring out the best medication and the other 50 percent is figuring out how the patient is going to get the medication into their body,” Taylor says.

Alongside her at the Dale Fell location of the Appalachian Mountain Community Health Centers during clinical rotations, they see what she means. As an example, she describes one of a dozen or so patients she sees in a typical day: a man experiencing homelessness who needs insulin therapy to manage his diabetes. “For someone in his scenario, there are a lot of barriers: no access to a refrigerator, the need for a clean injection site even though he doesn’t get to bathe frequently, the need to dispose of supplies in a safe way,” she explains.

And the list goes on.

She has enrolled him in a patient-assistance program to get him insulin even though he’s uninsured, and she’s prescribed the type of insulin that can last the longest without refrigeration. A diabetes grant has provided funds for a glucometer and other testing supplies so he can track his blood sugar.

“He has a lot of edema in his legs, because he sleeps in his car and can’t keep his feet elevated, so we found him some compression stockings, and that swelling is improving,” Taylor says. “And a social-work team is working on finding him housing.”

It’s been a three-year process to get the patient this far. But Taylor won’t give up, and that persistence is part of what she wants to pass on to her students.

“I challenge students to think about what is the best medication first and not to be deterred by the fact that the patient may not have easy access to the medicine or may not have a high rate of medication adherence,” she says. “Our role is to pick the best combination of medications and then work out how to make the situation work.”

Getting students involved

Taylor acts as a “preceptor,” or onsite ins

ructor, for students in their third and fourth years of pharmacy school. She has about 14 students doing month-long rotations with her each year. Onsite with her, they work as autonomously as the law allows, running appointments themselves while Taylor observes.

“Sometimes it starts out being very terrifying for them, but over the month they get more confident,” she says. “It’s especially good when they get to follow up with the same patients, seeing how their intervention worked or didn’t.”

Taylor says students are often shocked by the barriers some of their patients face, even though they’ve heard about them in class.

“Oftentimes we’re quick to judge people who are not taking their medications,” Taylor says. “But students who have been on the dispensing side of the situation get to unpack the other side of that when they are in the center and patients open up to them. They get to hear firsthand that a patient is struggling to either pay for their medicine or buy groceries or gas. And if they don’t take their medicine, they don’t immediately feel any different. So it’s a lot easier to understand their decision when you are talking with them.”

As a clinical pharmacist practitioner, an additional license that allows her to provide treatment unsupervised for certain conditions, Taylor sees patients one-on-one for 40-minute appointments, helping them manage their health despite hurdles. She became the first CPP at Appalachian Mountain Community Health Centers in 2017 and quickly proved the value of her services.

She outgrew her capacity but was able to expand the program and hire a second full-time pharmacist. The addition of Kailey Hoots (valedictorian of Wingate’s pharmacy class of 2020) at AMCHC’s location in Murphy, North Carolina, last year means patients there have a CPP onsite rather than having to use telehealth or wait for Taylor’s next trek from Asheville to the state’s far western corner.

But when it comes to ensuring that people get the medical help they need, Taylor isn’t opposed to travel. For the past decade, she has taken off to Honduras multiple times a year, often taking students with her to serve the village of Guachipilincito as part of a Shoulder to Shoulder medical brigade. She joined the board of the organization seven years ago and has since become its president.

“I just love helping people who are less fortunate,” Taylor says of her work in the remote village of about 500 people.

After her first brigade mission with a group from Brown University, she began trying to find a way to include Wingate students in the effort. Two years later, Taylor had constructed a for-credit course associated with the brigade, and in 2015 she took Wingate pharmacy student Evan Drake with her on a mission. Since then, she’s personally taken a dozen students down and recruited other faculty members to follow suit.

This summer, Taylor took students Haley Clark and Kendall Wick on the University’s first international trip since the beginning of the Covid pandemic. During four clinic days, their Shoulder to Shoulder team, which also included a physician, a medical student, a community health liaison and interpreters, saw 88 patients, dispensed 224 prescriptions and educated 61 elementary-school students on nutrition and dental hygiene.

“Dr. Taylor let Kendall and I run the pharmacy, which definitely boosted my confidence in being able to be a pharmacist,” Clark says. “At first, I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, what are we doing? We need to go ask her.’ But by the end of the week I felt much more confident in the decisions we were making and the medication counseling as well.”

Although the physician sometimes prescribed specific medications, at other times he would simply offer a diagnosis and leave it up to the pharmacy students to determine which of the limited medications were most appropriate.

“What surprised me most about the pharmacy was the limited formulary that we had,” Clark says, describing the handful of medicines they had for chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes. After putting the medication, often blister-packs of capsules, in zip-top bags, they would write dosage directions in Spanish and then spend time explaining to the patients how and when to take them.

“We would give them a 140-day supply for the chronic diseases to last until the next brigade comes in October,” Wick says.

At the end of the clinic day, they often hiked out to even more remote parts of Honduras to visit homebound patients.

“The home visits were probably my favorite part,” Clark says, describing the hikes as strenuous and humbling. “I felt completely drenched in sweat, and I know I looked like I had just gotten out of the shower. We’re wearing our hiking gear, carrying water, and we would meet locals who were barely breaking a sweat. Some of them were wearing flip-flops, sandals, Crocs – you name it. They’re not breathing hard at all, and we’re dying. We walk this path one time, and they are walking this every day to go to school or into town.”

The medication counseling that Wick and Clark were able to do, both at the clinic and in remote homes, gave them a chance to practice the teach-back method, checking their patient’s understanding by asking them to state in their own words what they need to do about their health or how they need to take their medication.

Taylor says the work in Guachipilincito is one of the first times that many pharmacy students truly feel a part of an interdisciplinary team.

“Ours is a very integrated clinic, as opposed to in the U.S., where pharmacies are often siloed,” she says. “While we’re there, the patients see the doctor and the pharmacist in the same space. It’s my chance to take a back seat and concentrate on practicing my Spanish while letting the students take the lead and collaborate with the physician.”

She said often students who join her on a mission enjoy the work so much they don’t want to leave. But when they do get back, they’re able to apply their new knowledge and confidence and also contrast what they’ve experienced in an underdeveloped country with conditions in a U.S. clinic.

Through it all, Taylor says, the most rewarding part of her role as professor is the relationships she builds with students. She connects with them early, when “they most often have a narrow view of pharmacy,” but then equips them with not only the clinical education but some important soft skills. Before you know it, they’re “connecting with peers, supervisors and patients and learning how to problem-solve strategically.”

Above the awards, that’s what makes her job so satisfying.

Learn more about the Wingate University School of Pharmacy at www.wingate.edu.

Lenoir-Rhyne Falls Against #1 Ferris St.

HICKORY, N.C. -- For the first time in the history of the AFCA Poll (2000-current), Lenoir-Rhyne took on the nation's top-ranked team but fell to No. 1 Ferris State by a final of 27-5 on Saturday. On a rainy afternoon, the No. 17 Bears were held in check by the reigning national champions.INSIDE THE MATCHUP: Final: Ferris St. 27, Lenoir-Rhyne 5 Records: Lenoir-Rhyne (1-1), Ferris St. (2-0) Location: Hickory, N.C. | Moretz StadiumS...

HICKORY, N.C. -- For the first time in the history of the AFCA Poll (2000-current), Lenoir-Rhyne took on the nation's top-ranked team but fell to No. 1 Ferris State by a final of 27-5 on Saturday. On a rainy afternoon, the No. 17 Bears were held in check by the reigning national champions.

INSIDE THE MATCHUP: Final: Ferris St. 27, Lenoir-Rhyne 5 Records: Lenoir-Rhyne (1-1), Ferris St. (2-0) Location: Hickory, N.C. | Moretz Stadium

STATS OF THE GAME: • Ferris State's open possession resulted in a three-and-out. On the fourth down punt, the ball sailed over the punters head and out of the back of the end zone for a safety. • The Bears ensuing possession started at their own 40 and the following drive started at Ferris State's 46. However, neither resulted in points as the Bulldog defense was stout. • Neither offense would score until Ferris State exploded for a 75-yard touchdown pass from backup QB Evan Cummings to Xavier Wade. Cummings earned the start as regular starter Mylik Mitchell was unavailable. • LR's first drive of the second quarter was ignited by a 43-yard connection from Sean White to Kelin Parsons which would set up a 36-yard field goal from Johnathan Medlin to cut the Bulldogs lead to 7-5 • From that point on, it was all Ferris St. Third-string QB Carson Gulker would record three rushing touchdowns and account for all the scoring the rest of the way as the Bulldogs imposed their will. Gulker finished the contest with a game-high 81 yards rushing on 18 carries. • The LR offense accounted for 94 yards on 56 plays -- an average of 1.7 per play -- and went just 1 of 16 on third downs. All-American RB Dwayne McGee was held to 36 yards rushing on 16 carries and Sean White went 9-for-24 for 78 yards. • Caleb Murphy had a monster performance for the visitors, tallying 12 tackles, six tackles for loss, five sacks and a forced fumble. As a team, Ferris St. brought down the QB seven times, the most sacks LR has allowed in a game in the NCAA Era. • Michael Owen's 12 punts were the most in a game in the NCAA Era for the Bears and he finished with 488 yards punting, the second-most in a single game. Owen's 68-yard punt is tied for the third-longest in program history.

BEYOND THE BOXSCORE: • LR's sack streak reached 56 straight games as Andre Jefferson and Willie Lane each recorded sacks. • Ferris State has now won 40 consecutive regular season games and have not lost a non-conference regular season game since September 2013. • LR saw its non-conference winning streak of nine games snapped. LR totaled just 16 yards rushing on 32 attempts. . • The last time LR was held to less than 50 rushing yards was against Wingate on October 15, 2016 when they ran for 39.

UP NEXT: LR will return to action on Saturday when they hit the road for the first time this season for a trip to Erskine.

HBCU Sports Week 2 staff picks: Some matchups are too close to call

HBCU Sports publisher Kenn Rashad, senior editor Kendrick Marshall, and Division II/HBCU recruiting reporter Jarrett Hoffman make predictions for Week 2.JARRETT HOFFMAN Shaw at Wayne StateWinston-Salem State at North Carolina CentralSt. Augustine’s vs LimestoneBowie State vs Saginaw Valley StateLincoln (PA...

HBCU Sports publisher Kenn Rashad, senior editor Kendrick Marshall, and Division II/HBCU recruiting reporter Jarrett Hoffman make predictions for Week 2.

JARRETT HOFFMAN

Shaw at Wayne State

Winston-Salem State at North Carolina Central

St. Augustine’s vs Limestone

Bowie State vs Saginaw Valley State

Lincoln (PA) at Central State

Livingstone at Elizabeth City State

Virginia Union at Valdosta State

Bluefield State at Virginia State

Johnson C. Smith at Allen

Fayetteville State vs Wingate

South Carolina State at Bethune-Cookman

Delaware State at Delaware

Morgan State at Towson

Howard at South Florida

Norfolk State at James Madison

Miles vs West Alabama

Benedict at Lane

Kentucky State at Fort Valley State

Clark Atlanta vs Erskine

Albany State at Florida A&M

Savannah State at Edward Waters

Tuskegee at Hampton

Texas Southern at North Texas

Mississippi Valley State at Austin Peay

Alabama State at UCLA

Alabama A&M at Troy

Jackson State vs Tennessee State

Grambling State at Northwestern State

Alcorn State at Tulane

Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs North American

Southern at LSU

Prairie View A&M at Abilene Christian

North Carolina A&T at North Dakota State

West Virginia State at Frostburg State

Langston at Texas College

KENN RASHAD

Shaw at Wayne State

Winston-Salem State at North Carolina Central

St. Augustine’s vs Limestone

Bowie State vs Saginaw Valley State

Lincoln (PA) at Central State

Livingstone at Elizabeth City State

Virginia Union at Valdosta State

Bluefield State at Virginia State

Johnson C. Smith at Allen

Fayetteville State vs Wingate

South Carolina State at Bethune-Cookman

Delaware State at Delaware

Morgan State at Towson

Howard at South Florida

Norfolk State at James Madison

Miles vs West Alabama

Benedict at Lane

Kentucky State at Fort Valley State

Clark Atlanta vs Erskine

Albany State at Florida A&M

Savannah State at Edward Waters

Tuskegee at Hampton

Texas Southern at North Texas

Mississippi Valley State at Austin Peay

Alabama State at UCLA

Alabama A&M at Troy

Jackson State vs Tennessee State

Grambling State at Northwestern State

Alcorn State at Tulane

Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs North American

Southern at LSU

Prairie View A&M at Abilene Christian

North Carolina A&T at North Dakota State

West Virginia State at Frostburg State

Langston at Texas College

KENDRICK MARSHALL

Shaw at Wayne State

Winston-Salem State at North Carolina Central

St. Augustine’s vs Limestone

Bowie State vs Saginaw Valley State

Lincoln (PA) at Central State

Livingstone at Elizabeth City State

Virginia Union at Valdosta State

Bluefield State at Virginia State

Johnson C. Smith at Allen

Fayetteville State vs Wingate

South Carolina State at Bethune-Cookman

Delaware State at Delaware

Morgan State at Towson

Howard at South Florida

Norfolk State at James Madison

Miles vs West Alabama

Benedict at Lane

Kentucky State at Fort Valley State

Clark Atlanta vs Erskine

Albany State at Florida A&M

Savannah State at Edward Waters

Tuskegee at Hampton

Texas Southern at North Texas

Mississippi Valley State at Austin Peay

Alabama State at UCLA

Alabama A&M at Troy

Jackson State vs Tennessee State

Grambling State at Northwestern State

Alcorn State at Tulane

Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs North American

Southern at LSU

Prairie View A&M at Abilene Christian

North Carolina A&T at North Dakota State

West Virginia State at Frostburg State

Langston at Texas College

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Top HBCU Performances from Week One

These are the top HBCU performances from football games of Sept 1-4, 2022.HBCU Performances: OffenseFive passers topped the 300-yard mark last week. ...

These are the top HBCU performances from football games of Sept 1-4, 2022.

HBCU Performances: Offense

Five passers topped the 300-yard mark last week. Junior quarterback Tyrell Jackson, who came over with head coach Maurice Flowers from Fort Valley State to Johnson C. Smith, topped the passing charts with 371 yards. The Golden Bulls fell in overtime to Bluefield State, 35-34.

Jackson State’s Shedeur Sanders had the most completions (29) and touchdowns (5) in the Tigers 59-3 win over Florida A&M.

Redshirt freshman quarterback Zach Yeager, in his first start, threw a day-high 48 passes (for 275) yards in NC A&T’s 28-13 loss to NC Central.

Three rushers topped the 200-yard mark led by Fort Valley State’s Emmanuel Wilson’s 265-yard output (on 20 carries. 10.5 yards per carry) in a 21-6 win over Tuskegee. Wilson, a redshirt junior, is a transfer from JC Smith who topped 1,000 yards as a freshman with the Golden Bulls in 2019.

Arkansas-Pine Bluff sophomore Kaevon Britton also topped 200 yards, rushing for 237 yards on the day’s high of 31 carries (7.6 yards per carry) and three touchdowns.

Johnson C. Smith freshman receiver Brevin Caldwell has the week’s best receiving performance. He hauled in 11 passes (for 119 yards) and three scores. He earned CIAA rookie of the week for his efforts.

Shaw redshirt sophomore wide receiver Ah’Shaan Belcher had 143 receiving yards (six catches, 1 TD) to lead all pass catchers this week. The Bears lost at home to Wingate, 21-7. Belcher won this week’s CIAA receiver of the week award.

HBCU Performances: Defense

Lane defensive back Jeremiah Brown, Grambling State linebacker Lewis Matthews and Hampton grad linebacker Qwahsin Townsel all recorded 14 stops. Lane fell to Arkansas-Pine Bluff 48-42 and Grambling came up short vs. Arkansas State, 58-3. Hampton pulled out a 31-28 win over Howard.

Al Joyce led defenders with three sacks in West Virginia State’s 29-6 win over Shippensburg.

Another trio – Elijah Wilson of Shaw, Justin Fleming of WSSU and Regional Jones of Allen each had two interceptions this week. Allen fell to Newberry, 40-6, while WSSU lost in Canton, Ohio to Central State.

Scores

Attendance Matters

Wingate program supporting first-generation college students to expand

WINGATE, N.C. — A grant is giving a boost to a new program for first-generation college students at Wingate University.What You Need To Know The First-Gen Bulldog Program started in fall 2021 with 46 freshmen.The program helps students who are the first in their immediate families to attend a four-year-institution. It offers information and connects them to resources and mentors.A $133,250 grant will allow the program to expand its reach to support first-generation college sophomores, junio...

WINGATE, N.C. — A grant is giving a boost to a new program for first-generation college students at Wingate University.

What You Need To Know

The First-Gen Bulldog Program started in fall 2021 with 46 freshmen.

The program helps students who are the first in their immediate families to attend a four-year-institution. It offers information and connects them to resources and mentors.

A $133,250 grant will allow the program to expand its reach to support first-generation college sophomores, juniors and seniors.

The funding will also be used for academic workshops, cultural trips, parent/guardian orientation and stipends for peer mentors.

First-generation college students needing financial support for school-related expenses will also be able to apply for hardship funding.

The incoming freshman class in the First-Gen Bulldog Program will arrive to campus a week earlier to settle in.

Savannah Phillips, who just finished her freshman year, participated in the program.

The English major said her parents didn’t pursue higher education but have always encouraged her to go to college.

“They always told me, we want you to have a job that you love going to every single day,” Phillips said.

However, the South Carolinian admits being a first-generation college student came with challenges.

“The overwhelming aspect of it all. You don’t know anything about college — anything,” Phillips said.

Phillips is grateful for the First-Gen Bulldog Program.

“If it weren’t for them, I would’ve been a lot more lost than I was,” Phillips said. “I feel like they made me feel welcome and at home here, just knowing I’m not the only first-gen student here.“If it weren’t for them, I would’ve been a lot more lost than I was,” Phillips said. “I feel like they made me feel welcome and at home here, just knowing I’m not the only first-gen student here.

According to Wingate University, almost 40% of its students are the first in their families to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.

Antonio Jefferson, Wingate’s assistant vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion, led the launch of the First-Gen Bulldog Program with the help of staff from Residence Life, the Academic Resources Center and the Dean of Campus Life.

He was also the first in his family to attend college, and receive a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree and a doctorate.

When he was in college, he was part of a federal program that helped first-generation college students.

“I saw how important it was to me to navigate the college experience, to receive that support,” Jefferson said.

Jefferson said the grade-point average for the fall semester for the First-Gen Bulldog Program first class was 2.8.

He added they not only did well in the classroom but on campus.

“They are leaders in student organizations. They have jobs on campus, so we are really seeing how these students came in and hit the ground running. We think that happened because they found a foundation in the first-gen program,” Jefferson said.

Phillips earned a 4.0 GPA both semesters of her freshman year. She was also involved in extracurriculars, including writing an advice column for the school newspaper.

She applied to be a mentor for first-generation college students in the fall and has already been hired to be a campus guide.

“I want to give back what Wingate gave to me my first semester,” Phillips said.

Other universities in North Carolina, including N.C. State, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC Charlotte, Eastern Carolina and Appalachian State, offer programs supporting first-generation college students.

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