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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
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electrician in York, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in York:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in York, SC

SC Law Enforcement investigating York County’s money transfer to Tepper companies

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division is investigating the transfer of money from York County to companies owned by Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper, according to a statement from SLED officials.The investigation was opened in November after a request by the S.C. Attorney Gene...

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division is investigating the transfer of money from York County to companies owned by Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper, according to a statement from SLED officials.

The investigation was opened in November after a request by the S.C. Attorney General, York County sheriff, and York County’s top prosecutor, officials said.

Late Thursday, SLED sent an emailed statement to The Herald confirming the investigation.

That statement says:

“SLED opened an investigation on November 7, 2022 into the transfer of public funds from York County to GTRE and/or it’s affiliates to include David Tepper, Appaloosa Management, Tepper Sports Holding and DT Sports Holding.

SLED was requested to investigate by York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson, York County Solicitor Kevin Brackett and Attorney General Alan Wilson.

This joint investigation with the York County Sheriff’s Office is ongoing, as such, no additional information is available at this time.”

The SLED statement comes a day after lawyers for Tepper companies and York County stated in court documents that the two sides had reached a settlement in the bankruptcy and related lawsuits.

GTRE, or GT Real Estate, is the company created by Tepper to oversee what would have been the NFL team’s headquarters and practice facility in Rock Hill, S.C. The project failed and resulted in GT Real Estate filing for bankruptcy. There also have been other related lawsuits.

In civil court documents from the GT Real Estate bankruptcy and lawsuits filed by York County, Tepper company lawyers have denied any wrongdoing.

Late Thursday, GT Real Estate issued a written statement to The Herald about the investigation.

The statement raised questions about the timing of the investigation announcement, a day after the settlement was confirmed that would, if approved, end the dispute between GTRE and York County.

GT said in the statement that the proposed settlement would pay York County the $21 million it originally asked for in the bankruptcy, plus interest.

The full GT Real Estate statement says:

It would be unfortunate if the recently announced settlement between GTRE and York County were somehow undermined by politically motivated leaks. The timing of these leaks is all the more curious in light of this settlement.

This is a straightforward commercial matter that is being fully resolved. The underlying disputes arise under contracts that were jointly negotiated by the parties and are publicly available. The funds paid by the County were handled consistent with the terms of those contracts.

The settlement fully compensates York County and settles all its claims related to GTRE’s bankruptcy case. To this end, $21.165 million has been escrowed for months to reimburse the County with interest.

No charges have been filed against anyone or any group and there has been no allegation of wrongdoing, sheriff and solicitor’s office officials said.

While there have been pending civil lawsuits for months during the bankruptcy of GT Real Estate, the SLED statement points to the first law enforcement inquiry associated with the project.

In a joint statement released Thursday night by York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson and 16th Circuit Solicitor Kevin Brackett, both said there should be no inference of any wrongdoing.

Here is the entire statement from Tolson and Brackett:

“An investigation into the circumstances surrounding the transfer to, and subsequent use of public money by the Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper and GTRE, the company created to oversee the construction of the Panthers training facility, was initiated by the York County Sheriff to determine whether any laws were violated during that process. The Attorney General, Solicitor Kevin Brackett’s Office and the State Law Enforcement Division have partnered with us to provide additional resources and assistance and we will work together to ensure that all relevant information is gathered so that a fair and just outcome can be reached.

An investigation is simply an inquiry and should not create any inference that wrongdoing has been committed by any party.

This office will have no further comment on the matter at this time.”

A deal had been struck with South Carolina, York County, and Rock Hill officials to move the team’s headquarters and practice fields to South Carolina.

Construction started on the site but GT halted construction in March. GT declared bankruptcy in June.

Appaloosa Management, Tepper Sports Holding and DT Sports Holding are all Tepper companies, according to Tepper company documents in the ongoing bankruptcy case and ongoing lawsuits related to the bankruptcy case.

In the bankruptcy case and related civil lawsuits, York County alleged it gave GT Real Estate more than $21 million in Pennies for Progress road tax money for the project. The county claimed the money could only be used for road improvements.

York County filed suit demanding the $21 million back, plus interest and money for projected tax revenues that were lost when the project collapsed.

This week, lawyers for York County and lawyers GT Real Estate announced in statements and court documents that a proposed settlement had been reached that would end all civil lawsuits between York County and the Tepper companies. That settlement has not yet been filed in court, nor has it been approved by a judge.

York County had previously filed two civil lawsuits against Tepper companies.

In the first lawsuit filed in June in South Carolina federal court, York County alleged DT Sports Holding, Tepper Sports Holding and Appaloosa Management were engaged in a conspiracy to misappropriate the $21 million. That suit, which called the failed practice site a “vanity project,” named Appaloosa Management LP, DT Sports Holding, Tepper Sports Holding Inc, and the City of Rock Hill as defendants. Tepper is one of the founders of Appaloosa Management.

In that civil lawsuit, York County alleged Tepper’s companies directed misappropriation of $21 million.

Then in September, York County filed a suit against GT Real Estate. In that lawsuit, York County claimed GT “squandered” the $21 million and converted it for “others’ improper use and unjust enrichment.”

Tepper company lawyers filed countersuits against York County in those civil cases and denied York County’s allegations of unjust enrichment and misuse of money.

This story was originally published December 1, 2022 7:55 PM.

Fort Mill has the lowest student poverty rate in three states. Here’s how others fare

New federal data shows almost 10,000 students across York, Lancaster and Chester counties live in poverty. Yet pockets within the tri-county area have some of the lowest poverty rates in the region.The U.S. Census Bureau released information last week from its Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program. It’s the only single-year data set for more than 3,100 counties and 13,000 school districts nationwide. The data shows a median poverty rate for school-ag...

New federal data shows almost 10,000 students across York, Lancaster and Chester counties live in poverty. Yet pockets within the tri-county area have some of the lowest poverty rates in the region.

The U.S. Census Bureau released information last week from its Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program. It’s the only single-year data set for more than 3,100 counties and 13,000 school districts nationwide. The data shows a median poverty rate for school-age children at 14.5% in 2021.

In South Carolina, an 18.8% rate meant almost 155,000 students in poverty. Across the country there were more than 8.6 million students in poverty.

Student poverty levels can impact everything from student achievement in the classroom to funding for schools.

York County has the lowest percentage of students in poverty among all 46 counties in South Carolina. The 10.8% rate represents a little more than 5,600 children. York County sits almost 2% lower than second place Lexington County.

Lancaster County is No. 8 in the state at 17.4%, or almost 2,800 students living in poverty. Chester County ranks No. 27 at 26.4%, with about 1,400 students in poverty. Despite the much lower rate of students in poverty, York County has more such students than Lancaster and Chester counties combined due to much larger total population.

York County also fares well in its Charlotte metro region.

Among Mecklenburg and counties surrounding it on either side of the state line, only Union County has a lower student poverty rate at 8.7%. Lincoln County isn’t far behind York, at 11.2%. Mecklenburg County has a 13.6% rate. Gaston County at 17.7% is the only bordering county higher than Lancaster.

Across the Carolinas, Union County is best and York County fifth for lowest student poverty rate.

All four York County school districts fare better than the state average for students in poverty, some of them far better.

The Fort Mill School District has the lowest poverty rate in South Carolina at 5.1%. That rate includes 931 students in poverty. Next, only Fort Jackson Schools (7.4%) in second comes in ahead of Clover School District, at 8.6%. Clover has 756 students in poverty.

The Rock Hill School District is No. 12 statewide. The 14.9% rate represents almost 3,000 students in poverty. The York School District is No. 16 at 16.7%, or 983 students in poverty.

Lancaster County School District follows next at No. 17, with almost 2,800 students in poverty for a rate of 17.2%. Chester County School District is No. 52 statewide with a 26.1% student poverty rate. That figure comes from about 1,400 students in poverty. The federal data source lists 97 school districts in South Carolina.

Fort Mill and Clover schools in particular also fare well within the Charlotte region. The Fort Mill rate is lowest among districts anywhere in the Carolinas (or Georgia). Clover and Union County Public Schools just north of Lancaster tie for fifth lowest student poverty rate in the two states. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools comes in at 13.4%.

Rock Hill and York schools fell a little behind most counties bordering Charlotte, but ahead of (for York and Clover) neighboring Gaston County.

In the seven-state region from Tennessee and North Carolina south, and east of the Mississippi River, the Fort Mill district ranks No. 10 for the lowest rate of students in poverty. Neither state that touches South Carolina has a district with lower poverty.

Fort Mill and Clover schools in particular have turned socioeconomic leverage into two of the highest performing districts in South Carolina. Rock Hill and York schools, too, often perform better on standardized tests than the state averages. Almost mirroring the districts’ economic placement within the state.

This fall as the Fort Mill school board discussed test score rankings that perched Fort Mill or Clover at the top across a variety of grade level and subject rankings, Fort Mill superintendent Chuck Epps said it’s the teachers his district is able to hire and retain that creates success. Yet Epps pointed to the community factor, too.

“We’ve always enjoyed strong parental support,” Epps said when the board met in September. “In fact that’s what separates us out through the years from other districts.”

While it would be difficult to argue against the advantages of a well-off district, there can be challenges. Some state and federal funding mechanisms for schools rely on socioeconomic data. As the lowest poverty rate in the state, Fort Mill can miss out on extra dollars other districts might get.

At the same time, quality schools in areas like Fort Mill and Clover are major population growth drivers in those areas. A key reason why Fort Mill, Clover and now even York schools asked York County officials for help through impact fees to charge new residential construction. Education costs more as more students arrive, adding need for teachers, classroom space and more.

The new data from the census bureau isn’t the same formula used in South Carolina to determine funding. In this state, a poverty index scores districts using factors that include medical and food benefit program participation, housing and other factors. Then there are programs like free and reduced lunch participation, which may involve a student or parent notifying a school. The census data, in contrast, surveys household financial situations.

Still, there are similarities. This year’s poverty index score lists Fort Mill at a 19.6. Not counting South Carolina Governor’s School programs, Fort Mill has by far the lowest index score statewide. Clover is second in the state with a 32.1 score. The state average score is 60.6.

Joe Burke, public information officer for the Fort Mill district, said the new census numbers and district figures submitted to and used by the state aren’t easily compared. Generally, he said, issues of funding that rely on poverty or similar socioeconomic data don’t favor Fort Mill compared to other areas.

“Any time something’s calculated on that, we end up on the bottom end,” Burke said.

A practical if perhaps unusual impact of the funding system based on socioeconomic data came at the height of COVID-19. At time bitter arguments raged beginning two years ago on whether students, teachers and others involved with schools should have to wear masks as pandemic infections climbed. Some demanded the Fort Mill district require masks. Some demanded the district not require them.

As a new school year started in 2021, some districts statewide mandated masks despite state law at the time against such mandates. Epps told his school board the decision to recommend but not require masks was in part a funding one. Since Fort Mill gets far fewer federal dollars due to its low poverty rate than other districts, Epps couldn’t rationalize going against the state rule when half of his $15 million a month budget came from the state. At the time Epps said such a move could jeopardize the operation of the district.

Overall poverty rates for people under age 18 range from less than 1% to almost 73% in communities nationwide, according to separate data released by the census bureau last week. The national child poverty rate dropped from 21.2% in the previous five-year survey to 17% for the new one. The rate was still higher than a national overall poverty rate of 12.6%.

For all ages, York County is tied for No. 10 among counties in the Carolinas with a 9.7% poverty rate. Nearby Union County in North Carolina is best at 7.7%. Lancaster County has a rate of 11.8%. Chester County has a 17.3% rate.

Update: All lanes open on I-77 after morning crash in York County SC backed up traffic

All southbound lanes of Interstate 77 near Exit 82 in York County, South Carolina, re-opened Friday afternoon after a multi-vehicle crash involving a tanker and other vehicles.The four lanes of southbound I-77 close to the Catawba River were operating after 3 p.m. and the site had been cleared, said Chuck Haynes, York County Emergency Management Director.The crash north of Rock Hill city limits blocked part of the highway for h...

All southbound lanes of Interstate 77 near Exit 82 in York County, South Carolina, re-opened Friday afternoon after a multi-vehicle crash involving a tanker and other vehicles.

The four lanes of southbound I-77 close to the Catawba River were operating after 3 p.m. and the site had been cleared, said Chuck Haynes, York County Emergency Management Director.

The crash north of Rock Hill city limits blocked part of the highway for hours from the overnight hours through the morning commute. Then, two lanes re-opened shortly before noon, according to Haynes and the York County Sheriff’s Office.

Traffic had been backed up on I-77 southbound more than six miles to Exit 88, before two southbound lanes re-opened before noon, officials said.

The S.C. Highway Patrol is investigating the crash but has not released details about the collision.

The back up on the northern side of the crash site caused delays for Fort Mill school district transportation, said Joe Burke, spokesman for the school district.

The district sent out an alert to parents that said:

“We are experiencing bus delays with all routes this morning due to the increased traffic caused by the closure of I-77. We are working to get students transported as quickly as possible but there will be delays across the district this morning.”

Effects on Rock Hill school district traffic were limited mainly to staff who might live north of the district and had to deal with traffic getting to campuses, said Lindsay Machak, spokesperson for the Rock Hill school district.

The York County Sheriff’s Office sent out alerts through the morning hours about the crash.

“There are several people with injuries but no deaths at this time.”

Haynes said one of the vehicles involved was a tanker carrying gasoline. No gasoline spilled from the tanker, Haynes said.

There was no fire, Haynes said.

A small amount of diesel fuel from the truck did spill on the road, Haynes said.

The highway patrol, Riverview Fire Department and other emergency responders were on scene.

An alternative route for traffic was U.S. 21. That highway parallels the interstate from Rock Hill to Carowinds Boulevard near the North Carolina state line.

There are only two bridges in that area -- I-77 and U.S. 21 -- where traffic can move across the Catawba River. All traffic had to use the southbound U.S. 21 bridge, Haynes said.

The number of vehicles involved in the crash has not yet been revealed.

Photos shared on social media by the York County Sheriff’s Office show the tanker truck was left upside down near the Cherry Road exit into Rock Hill.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control was notified, officials said.

This story was originally published August 19, 2022 5:31 AM.

Aging mobile home park may be solution for affordable housing in York, SC

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.The proposed project is on ...

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.

The proposed project is on McAfee Court in York, where there are about 40 mobile homes. Virgie Cherry, a resident of 16 years, said she wishes it would be maintained better.

“All this garbage out here," Cherry said. "These people don’t like cleaning yards."

High grass, trash, unpaved roads and some homes on the brink of collapse are just some of the complaints from residents on McAfee Court, many of whom can’t afford to leave the aging mobile home community.

But a new proposal to replace these homes with space for 400 new manufactured homes by Bull Creek LLC is bringing hope to some.

RELATED: 'It's a very difficult market' | Housing program uses incentives for property owners to help make housing more affordable

Richard Gee with Bull Creek LLC said families already living in the community would be the first to get a chance to buy a home and rent land in the new development.

Gee said right now many residents are paying around $1,000 to live here. Under his proposal, the cost for housing would stay under $1,500 a month but with better conditions.

“I can ensure that it’s clean, it’s picked up, it’s safe," Gee said. "Sidewalks, paved roads, streetlights, streetlamps, amenities.”

Most importantly, Gee said it would be affordable -- something that is very much needed in this community.

As more families turn to manufactured homes as a solution for affordable housing, demand has pushed prices up. According to census data, nationally the price of manufactured homes rose by nearly 50% during the pandemic.

Resident Vincent Maloco said he supports the project if it means his family can have a home.

WCNC Charlotte is always asking "where's the money?" If you need help, reach out to WCNC Charlotte by emailing money@wcnc.com.

“A proposal like this one would give 400 families an opportunity to start the American dream," Maloco said.

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

“I think this plan totally fits what we want to see in our backyard as opposed to some of the rundown and dilapidated mobile units that are here now," Roddey said.

The first reading was approved by the county council this week. Council will discuss the project again next month.

Here’s the latest on more than 1,000 new homes planned in York and Lancaster counties

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.Projects include:? Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision...

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.

Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.

Projects include:

? Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision at Sixth Baxter Crossing and Hugh Street, near North Sutton Road. The property is almost 3 acres. The plan involves 20 townhomes.

The Borough at Sixth Baxter is, according to county information sent to the planning commission, the last lot in Baxter Village to be sold by Clear Springs Baxter. The property is near both residential and commercial space, including an urgent care site.

? The Bull Creek project in York is back up for county review. County planning staff recommends against the plan for a 409-lot manufactured home community at 975 McAfee Court. County planning staff doesn’t believe that scale of development is consistent with residential and agricultural uses in that area now, according to information sent to the planning commission. The 155-acre property has 62 mobile homes on it now.

? Owners of 14 acres on Saluda Street in Rock Hill applied to rezone the property to allow a new 11-home subdivision. There are five manufactured homes there, plus wooded and grassy areas. A sketch plan shows all 11 lots off a single entrance from Saluda, which leads to a cul-de-sac.

The property is east of Ogden Farms and south of Cedarbrook, between Porter Black Road and Autumnwood Drive.

? Almost 200 more homes are still planned, but could come later than was laid out in a prior county approval. Fielding Homes got county approval to build four new phases of Paddlers Cove in Lake Wylie. The 135-acre new portion of the existing subdivision is set for 195 homes.

County approvals typically come with two-year vested rights. Developers have to request annual extensions if they don’t start until after the vested rights period ends. Developers get up to five such extensions. The owner asks the county now for an extension to run through March 2023.

The Lancaster County planning commission met Thursday night. The commission recommended a zoning change for almost 44 acres that would allow a new home subdivision. Lancaster County Council will make the final decision.

The property on the southeast corner of Fork Hill Road and Little Dude Avenue is owned by R&C Investments. Earl Coulston applied for the zoning change. The site is just north of Kershaw, about a mile west of Haile Gold Mine.

Dale Robertson is a partner with R&C Investments. Robertson has done other residential projects in that area, with the mine in mind.

“There’s just a lot of people that are driving an hour and fifteen minutes, some of them two hours, to work,” Robertson told the planning commission Thursday. “There’s hardly no houses down there for people to buy.”

A plan with an exact number of new homes hasn’t been submitted, but the new zoning would allow up to 2.5 homes per acre. Or, roughly 110 homes for a property that size.

An even larger project was on the planning commission agenda Thursday, but was deferred until next month. Rezoning and a development agreement are proposed for Arbor Walk. That new home subdivision could have 233 homes on almost 113 acres on Vance Baker Road.

The planning commission in Rock Hill met Tuesday, where one of several property proposals was the Arbors at Seven Oaks project. Owner Rock Hill Multifamily Investments applied for preliminary plat approval on Springsteen Road and Evelyn Street. There are three parcels, two in front of the Seven Oaks subdivivision and the other with a pond on Evelyn.

Plans show 148 townhomes proposed on 21 acres. The site was approved for 220 apartments in 2014. Plans have changed and been pushed back several times due to utility and other negotiations.

Several road upgrades are part of the plan. Access to the site southwest of Seven Oaks Boulevard will come from a new driveway connection to Springsteen. The area northeast of Seven Oaks Boulevard will have a new drive onto Springsteen and and another onto Evelyn, across from Wildwood Drive. A left turn lane on Springsteen at Evelyn will be added, and the intersection will be realigned. Springsteen also will be widened to create a center turn lane.

This story was originally published May 6, 2022 11:39 AM.

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