loading
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
104 Mitchell Dr Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in York, SC

Let's Talk!

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in York:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

Schedule Appointment

Latest News in York, SC

York high school jamboree to honor Bill Pate, the football town’s unforgettable coach

Coach always called him “Big Rook.”Tony Poag first heard that nickname in the fall of 1986, when he was a freshman on the York varsity football team. The lineman would achieve football greatness at York and beyond: He’d be a part of York’s sole state championship football team in 1986. He’d go on to play football at Hampton University. And when he wasn’t bullying people on the offensive or defensive lines in high school, he was kicking field goals as “the only 270-pound kicker in South Carolin...

Coach always called him “Big Rook.”

Tony Poag first heard that nickname in the fall of 1986, when he was a freshman on the York varsity football team. The lineman would achieve football greatness at York and beyond: He’d be a part of York’s sole state championship football team in 1986. He’d go on to play football at Hampton University. And when he wasn’t bullying people on the offensive or defensive lines in high school, he was kicking field goals as “the only 270-pound kicker in South Carolina.”

And yet, when asked what he remembers about his high school head football coach, he comes back to “Big Rook” and of other memories from his freshman year, when his coach threw him “right into the fire,” expecting Poag to deliver the world.

“I didn’t understand it at first,” Poag told The Herald. “But as you get older, you understand why he was so tough on you. It’s because he saw something that others didn’t see, or even you didn’t see.”

York leaders are making sure that Bill Pate’s impact will be seen forever.

York Comprehensive High School will host its inaugural “Bill Pate White Rose Memorial Football Classic” on Aug. 12, the Friday before the start of the high school football regular season. Fans on hand will see eight teams gather at the Cougar Den for some preseason football action. Laurens and Fort Mill are slated to play at 6 p.m. Providence and Blythewood will play at 7 p.m. Clover and Providence Day will play at 8 p.m. And Clinton and York will play at 9 p.m.

The jamboree is being put on for a variety of reasons, York coach Dean Boyd said on Wednesday. Among those reasons is to grow this into “the best preseason jamboree in the Carolinas” and to honor a coach who Boyd’s hometown community won’t forget.

“He’s just got so many connections to this community,” Boyd said. ”When I decided I was going to do this, I raised $13,000 in one afternoon. And it’s because of his name. So that tells you what he means to this community and what he means to the coaches in this state.”

Look around the York cafeteria on Wednesday, during the football classic media day, and you saw Pate’s impact everywhere.

Dwayne Hartsoe was there. The athletic director and head basketball coach at Fort Mill played for Pate on the York baseball team when he was in high school, and Pate gave Hartsoe his first job in South Carolina coaching. Brian Lane from Clover was there, and his boss, Bailey Jackson, is Pate’s nephew. Most of the coaches there knew Pate, including Clinton coach Corey Fountain, who is from the same Lamar hometown that Pate was. Almost all of the sponsors of the event — the ones who helped fund the jamboree — are former Pate players. (And some are even York state champions.) Pate’s wife, Carolyn, and his daughter, Karen, were in attendance, too.

“He’s a legend, man,” Hartsoe told The Herald on Wednesday. “He would take me to Lamar, to his hometown. We’d go there to play golf, and we didn’t pay for anything. People knew who he was. They’d feed us. They’d invite him into their homes. He was just a legend.”

Stories of Pate flow by the gallon in York. The coach, who died at age 88 on Christmas Eve, won over his community’s affection by unabashedly being his hard-nosed, tough, disciplined self — wringing the most out of his players and his coaches and his teams and his communities. It’s what made him a successful high school football and baseball and American Legion baseball coach for four decades, and it’s what helped earn him membership into the South Carolina Football Coaches Hall of Fame.

Matt Harper played three years under Pate, including in that 1986 championship season. The former fullback said Pate was a no-nonsense coach who separated “the guys just wanting to wear a jersey from the guys eager to create a winning program” as soon as he arrived. (JR Boyd, an assistant under Pate, corroborated the story: 3A York fielded a remarkably slim team of 19 players in Pate’s first year.)

Harper also said that Pate “made you believe in yourself, your team and your community” and that he taught that poor performance has “tiring consequences” — in football and in life.

“If your game preparation was not up to par at the beginning of the week, the practice field lights would come on, the gates to the field would be locked to keep everyone (else) out, including parents,” Harper wrote to The Herald in an email earlier this week. “Coach Pate may eventually leave, but the assistant coaches and players would still be there. At some point well after 9-10 p.m., when everyone thought they might die, we would go home. The next day of practice would come around, and we would look like a completely new team.

“This was one of the most important lessons I personally learned: When you think you do not have any more to give and you are exhausted, there is a lot more in the tank.”

Chris Stephenson, who played as a tight end and defensive end all four years under Pate and was a senior during that 1986 season, shared similar stories. Stephenson still lives in York, and every once in a while he said he gets stopped at the grocery store and gets congratulated and thanked for bringing a championship to York all those 36 years ago.

He chuckled when recalling one of the first things Pate did when he was at York.

“At that time, we had three mascots that came about in the early ‘70s,” Stephenson said. That mishmash of mascots was a result of multiple schools condensing into York Comprehensive High School. “In football, we were the Green Dragons. In basketball, we were the Blue Devils. And in baseball, we were the Red Cardinals. And — this is just typical of his mentality, his no-nonsense style — Coach Pate was like, ‘This is crazy. We got one school with three mascots. This makes no sense.’

“So he was very instrumental in his first year changing our mascot to the Cougars, which is what we are today.”

Pate coached football and baseball all over South Carolina, spending a bulk of his career at Timmonsville and Lake View. He only spent seven seasons at York — from 1983 to 1989 — and yet the community easily and pridefully calls back to the days of “Coach Pate” to this day.

Why?

“The York program was suffering at the time that he came in, and he brought in discipline,” Boyd said. “He was hard to play for, now. He wasn’t an easy man. ... People say, ‘Gosh, he was only in this place for (seven) years, and he made that big a difference?’ Yeah he did. Because he was at the right place, at the right time, getting things done the right way.”

Dean’s brother, JR, has an idea of why he was so significant in his seven years, too. He was an assistant under Pate before assuming the York job and then building a legacy of his own in Lamar.

JR has endless stories of Pate. Some reflect Pate’s military background, of how he’d drape an American flag over the fence before every practice and kick out players who didn’t work as hard as he demanded. Some reflect Pate’s ferocity, like when he yelled at an umpire one time on the baseball diamond. (“I’ve been thrown out of more games than you’ve umpired!” JR Boyd recalled Pate saying to an umpire once. The memory makes him laugh to this day.)

But JR Boyd knows why, ultimately, York will never forget him. In a town that loves its football — one with a highway named after a former football coach (Tommy Oates Highway) — Pate turned a football team into a football champion.

“It’s always been a football town, and they’ve always come close,” JR Boyd said, “but they won one with Coach Pate. ... He was a great guy, and no matter what sport he coached, he was a winner.”

And he made the people and communities around him winners, too.

When: Aug. 12, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Where: York Comprehensive High School

Tickets: $8 on https://gofan.co

Other notes: Before the games, each school will compete in a Tailgate Cook-Off. The 1986 York state championship football team will also be inducted into the YCHS Hall of Fame after the second game.

This story was originally published July 20, 2022 4:55 PM.

Fort Mill teacher pay is going up again. But it’s another move that will raise taxes

Teacher pay will increase again in Fort Mill. That move by itself doesn’t require a tax increase, but a separate decision made Wednesday will.The Fort Mill School District board voted Wednesday to add contract days for special education teacher training, more preschool intervention for students in need and maintenance positions. The cost of more than $400,000 will come from a one mill tax rate increase and a transfer from contingency funds.A on...

Teacher pay will increase again in Fort Mill. That move by itself doesn’t require a tax increase, but a separate decision made Wednesday will.

The Fort Mill School District board voted Wednesday to add contract days for special education teacher training, more preschool intervention for students in need and maintenance positions. The cost of more than $400,000 will come from a one mill tax rate increase and a transfer from contingency funds.

A one mill increase raises more than $300,000 for the district.

“Even though it is only one mill, it is a tax increase,” said board Chairwoman Kristy Spears. “But it is specifically a tax increase not on houses. Not on primary residences.”

Businesses will pay the tax increase from Wednesday’s decision. So will rentals and property tax on cars and boats. Someone with a $30,000 vehicle would pay less than $5 more per year. Businesses would pay varying amounts based on their properties.

Board members say there were considerable funding challenges this year that make the increase necessary if they want to fund needs. Additional work with 4K students and training that could help in the high turnover area of special education instruction can have lasting impact for students and staff, board members said.

“Our primary focus should be, what can we do to improve the school district?” said board member Scott Frattaroli. “What is within our authority to get the needs for our students? This is our authority of what we are able to do to serve our students, to serve our staff, to serve our families. This is it.”

Board member Celia McCarter pointed to a state increase on the district share of employee health insurance from its typical 3% a year to 18% this year. That cost the district $1.2 million. Fort Mill also doesn’t get the same state funding other areas do, based on demographics.

“This is the only funding mechanism that we have at our discretion to make a difference in education for Fort Mill students,” board member Michele Branning said of the tax increase. “I think that it is worth the trade-off.”

The tax decision came right after the board approved yet another pay increase for teachers.

“Any day we can increase the pay for our teachers is a great day,” said board member Wayne Bouldin.

In June the board approved $2,000 increases in annual teacher pay. New state funding, updated estimates from the June tax reports in York County, interest on investment allocations and more combined with contingency money will allow another $300 per teacher.

Those increases would bring the starting teacher salary to $43,700, highest among nearby districts, according to Leanne Lordo, assistant superintendent and district CFO.

That distinction is significant.

“We’re recruiting from all over the country now,” said superintendent Chuck Epps. “And you don’t know much about Fort Mill or Clover or York. So when you look at that and you add the $300 and you put us back at No. 1 in the region, you get their attention right off the bat. It’s a recruitment issue for us.”

A new state requirement that districts start at $40,000 or more means state money was provided to districts that weren’t at that level. Fort Mill didn’t get that additional money.

“The gap is going to become smaller and smaller across districts as far as teacher pay, which is going to make it even harder to recruit new teachers from out of state who really don’t know that much about South Carolina and specifically our area,” Lordo said.

McCarter said increased teacher pay statewide is both a positive step and a challenge.

“I’m incredibly encouraged that it looks like our surrounding districts are able and putting more money into paying teachers,” McCarter said. “We have learned and we know how important and valuable teachers are, and how hard they work. And I believe we need to, as a culture and as a society, start emphasizing that better by paying them that way.”

Yet, she said, pay increases prove a challenge in Fort Mill if the district wants to remain on top.

“We need to pay the best, recruit the best and keep the best,” McCarter said.

In Fort Mill, it’s the constant need for more teachers that makes higher pay difficult. The district typically needs to add double-digit new positions a year, and often has considerable increases with the opening of a new school. Already there’s preliminary work toward opening a new elementary and middle school.

“We are certainly still challenged with the fact that we are the fastest growing district in South Carolina,” Lordo said. “We are having to still hire probably, proportionately, the highest number of new teachers a year to accommodate our growth and our state funding is not at the same level as some of our surrounding districts.”

All this is happening while Fort Mill and other districts face a dwindling pool of candidate teachers.

“What we have seen happening in the education field across the state and the nation, as far as teacher recruitment and retention, this has become a vital consideration in maintaining our teacher salaries at the highest level that we can fund,” Lordo said.

The latest $300 increase for teachers comes without its own tax hike. Board members say they’d like to pay teachers more, but have to balance that desire with funding limitations.

“To me it’s a balance because it’s not only our staff,” Epps said. “It’s also the public and the tax money.”

This story was originally published July 21, 2022 2:55 PM.

Samuel Packaging Systems Group expanding operations in York County

Company’s $11.5 million investment to create an estimated 20 new jobs COLUMBIA, S.C. – Samuel Packaging Systems Group, a division of ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. Samuel Packaging Systems Group, a division of Samuel, Son & Co. (USA) Inc., today announced plans to expand operations in York County. The company’s $11.5 million investment will create an estimated 20 new jobs.

Samuel Packaging Systems Group is a complete, single-source supplier for clients’ packaging and unitizing needs. The company specializes in polyester (PET) strapping, a lower cost and more durable alternative to steel strap.

Located at 2000 Boyer Road in Fort Mill, Samuel Packaging Systems Group’s expansion will upgrade existing production lines and will include the purchase of a new PET strand line. The current facility was opened in 1996 and is approximately 203,300 square feet.

The expansion is expected to be complete in the first quarter of 2023. Individuals interested in joining the Samuel Packaging Systems Group team should visit the company’s careers page.

QUOTES

“Samuel arrived in York Country in 1996 with two production lines and 25 new jobs. With the support of York County, we have grown to four production lines and over 90 jobs, and additional jobs when the fifth line arrives. Samuel is a global provider of plastic strapping and invests where we have success. The support of York County is a great example of a partnership that creates success.” -Samuel Packaging Systems Group President Cy Slifka

“When an existing company in South Carolina expands, it further solidifies our state’s reputation of having a superior business climate. Today, we celebrate Samuel Packaging Systems Group’s growth in York County, and we look forward to their success for many years to come.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“Congratulations to Samuel Packaging Systems Group on their growth in York County. This $11.5 million investment and estimated 20 additional jobs are an added boost to the area, and we celebrate their success within our borders.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

"York County is proud to see Samuel Packaging Systems Group expand as they make this new investment and create additional jobs within our community. It is always good news for our county and our state when one of our existing manufacturers expands. We look forward to watching them continue to grow." -York County Council Chairwoman Christi Cox

Baltimore Symphony’s New Conductor Breaks a Racial Barrier

For decades, the 25 largest orchestras in the United States have been led almost exclusively by white men.That is going to change. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra announced on Thursday that it had chosen Jonathon Heyward, a rising African American conductor, as its next music director. He will begin a five-year contract in Baltimore at the start of the 2023-24 season.Heyward, 29, who grew up in Charleston, S.C., the son of an African American father and a white mother, will be the first person of color to lead the orchestra in...

For decades, the 25 largest orchestras in the United States have been led almost exclusively by white men.

That is going to change. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra announced on Thursday that it had chosen Jonathon Heyward, a rising African American conductor, as its next music director. He will begin a five-year contract in Baltimore at the start of the 2023-24 season.

Heyward, 29, who grew up in Charleston, S.C., the son of an African American father and a white mother, will be the first person of color to lead the orchestra in its 106-year history. In an interview, he said that he would work to expand the audience for classical music by bolstering education efforts and promoting underrepresented artists.

“This art form is for everyone,” he said.

Heyward will succeed Marin Alsop, the first female music director of a top-tier American orchestra, whose tenure in Baltimore ended last year. His appointment comes amid a broader reckoning in classical music over severe gender and racial disparities.

The choice to hire Heyward is a milestone for Baltimore, where Black residents make up more than 60 percent of the population.

“We are inspired by his artistry, passion and vision for the B.S.O., as well as for what his appointment means for budding musicians who will see themselves better reflected in such a position of artistic prominence,” Mark Hanson, the orchestra’s president and chief executive, said in a statement.

Heyward, who is the chief conductor of the Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie in Germany, has garnered a reputation as a sensitive and charismatic conductor. His appointment comes at a challenging time for orchestras, with many ensembles, including Baltimore’s, struggling to win back arts patrons because of the pandemic — a crisis that has exacerbated long-term declines in ticket sales and forced arts groups to look for new ways to reach audiences, including through livestreaming.

The Baltimore Symphony recently announced that it would cut 10 concerts from its coming season at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, its longtime home, amid tepid ticket sales. Attendance in Baltimore during the 2021-22 season averaged at 40 percent of capacity, down from 62 percent in 2018-19.

Heyward said that he was confident audiences would eventually return, and added that he would work to make the orchestra more relatable by programming a wider variety of works, featuring a greater diversity of performers and moving some concerts away from traditional venues.

“It’s simply a knack of being able to really understand what the community needs and listening to what the community needs and then being able to get them in the door,” he said.

Although Heyward has been based in Europe for much of his career, he has started to appear more frequently in the United States. Last spring, he led several concerts in Baltimore, including the orchestra’s first performance of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 15, as well as a benefit concert for Ukraine. He is scheduled to appear with the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra at Lincoln Center in early August, leading a program that features the violinist Joshua Bell.

In 2017, when Heyward was 25, he was widely praised for a series of performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, when he substituted at the last minute for an ill conductor. That program included a premiere by the composer Tania León, as well as works by Stravinsky, Glinka and Leonard Bernstein.

“He knew when to lead and when to follow, effortlessly balancing his roles as a natural showman and sensitive collaborator in service to the music,” the critic Rick Schultz wrote in The Los Angeles Times.

The conducting field has long struggled with a lack of diversity. In recent years, there has been only one Black music director in the top tier of American orchestras, and just a handful of leaders have been Latino or of Asian descent.

With turnover expected soon at several major orchestras, there are signs of change. This season, Nathalie Stutzmann takes the podium at the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. She will be only the second woman to lead a top-tier American orchestra.

Heyward will also be among the Baltimore Symphony’s youngest leaders. He began studying cello at 10. A graduate of the Boston Conservatory, he later served as an assistant conductor of the Hallé Orchestra in England, under its longtime music director, Mark Elder.

Heyward said that his own experience of falling in love with classical music had convinced him of its enduring appeal.

“If a 10-year-old boy from Charleston, South Carolina, with no music education background, with no musicians in the family, can be enamored and amazed by this, by the best art form there is — classical music — then I think anyone can,” he said. “I plan on trying to prove that in many, many ways.”

Aging mobile home park may be solution for affordable housing in York, SC

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.The proposed project is on ...

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.

The proposed project is on McAfee Court in York, where there are about 40 mobile homes. Virgie Cherry, a resident of 16 years, said she wishes it would be maintained better.

“All this garbage out here," Cherry said. "These people don’t like cleaning yards."

High grass, trash, unpaved roads and some homes on the brink of collapse are just some of the complaints from residents on McAfee Court, many of whom can’t afford to leave the aging mobile home community.

But a new proposal to replace these homes with space for 400 new manufactured homes by Bull Creek LLC is bringing hope to some.

Richard Gee with Bull Creek LLC said families already living in the community would be the first to get a chance to buy a home and rent land in the new development.

Gee said right now many residents are paying around $1,000 to live here. Under his proposal, the cost for housing would stay under $1,500 a month but with better conditions.

“I can ensure that it’s clean, it’s picked up, it’s safe," Gee said. "Sidewalks, paved roads, streetlights, streetlamps, amenities.”

Most importantly, Gee said it would be affordable -- something that is very much needed in this community.

As more families turn to manufactured homes as a solution for affordable housing, demand has pushed prices up. According to census data, nationally the price of manufactured homes rose by nearly 50% during the pandemic.

Resident Vincent Maloco said he supports the project if it means his family can have a home.

WCNC Charlotte is always asking "where's the money?" If you need help, reach out to WCNC Charlotte by emailing money@wcnc.com.

“A proposal like this one would give 400 families an opportunity to start the American dream," Maloco said.

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

“I think this plan totally fits what we want to see in our backyard as opposed to some of the rundown and dilapidated mobile units that are here now," Roddey said.

The first reading was approved by the county council this week. Council will discuss the project again next month.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.