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282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
282 Thorpe St, Summerville, SC 29483
Mon-Fri 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

electrician in York, SC

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A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

  • Parking Lot Light Installation
  • Electrical Safety Inspections
  • Electrical Grounding for Businesses
  • Generator and Motor Insulation Resistance Analysis
  • Electrical Troubleshooting for Businesses
  • Ongoing Maintenance Plans for Vital Electrical Equipment
  • Transformer Installation
  • Circuit Testing for Businesses
  • Preventative Maintenance for Electrical Equipment
  • Electrical Wiring for New Businesses
  • Electrical Service Upgrades
  • Much More

A few of our most popular commercial and industrial electrical services include but are not limited to:

Circuit Breakers

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Your businesses' electrical system will trip when it has too much electricity running through it. These problems are very common in commercial properties and usually stem from one of three culprits: circuit overloads, short circuits, and ground fault surges. Obviously, when your circuits are tripped regularly, your business operations suffer. To help solve your circuit breaker problems, our commercial electricians will come to your location for in-depth troubleshooting. Once we discover the root cause, we'll get to work on repairing your circuit breaker, so you can continue working and serving your customers.

Flickering Lights

Flickering Lights

Like tripped circuit breakers, dimming or flickering lights are among the most common commercial electrical problems in South Carolina. These issues typically stem from poor electrical connections. These poor connections will usually cause sparks, which can start fires and wreak havoc on your commercial building. While dimming lights might seem minor, if you leave this problem to fester, you could be looking at permanent damage to your businesses' electrical systems. Given the danger involved in fixing this problem, it's important that you work with a licensed business electrician like Engineered Electrical Solutions as soon as you're able to.

Dead Power Outlets

Dead Power Outlets

Dead power outlets aren't always dangerous, unlike other recurring commercial electrical issues. They are, however, disruptive to your company's productivity. Dead outlets are common in older commercial buildings and are often caused by circuit overloads. Connecting multiple high-wattage devices and appliances to the same power socket can cause overheating. When the power outlet overheats, it can lead to tripped circuit breakers. In some cases, the live wire catches fire and burns until it is disconnected. For a reliable solution using high-quality switches, sockets, and circuit breakers, it's best to hire a professional business electrician to get the job done right.

Residential Electrician vs. Commercial Electrician in York:
What's the Difference?

Finding a real-deal, qualified commercial electrician in South Carolina is harder than you might think. Whether it's due to availability or budget, you might be tempted to hire a residential electrician for your commercial electrical problem. While it's true that great residential electricians can help solve commercial issues in theory, it's always best to hire a business electrician with professional experience.

Unlike their residential colleagues, commercial electricians are licensed to deal with different materials and procedures suited specifically for businesses. Commercial wiring is much more complex than residential, and is strategically installed with maintenance, repair, and changes in mind. Additionally, commercial properties usually use a three-phase power supply, necessitating more schooling, skills, and technical ability to service.

The bottom line? If you're a business owner with commercial electricity problems, it's best to work with a licensed commercial electrician, like you will find at Engineered Electrical Solutions.

Professional and Efficient from
Call to Technician

Shields Painting has been in the business since 1968. In a world where so much has changed, we are proud to uphold the ideals that make us successful: hard, honest work, getting the job done right, and excellent customer service. Providing you with trustworthy, quality work will always take priority over rushing through a project to serve the next customer. That is just not the way we choose to do business.

As professionals dedicated to perfection, we strive to provide a unique painting experience for every customer - one that focuses on their needs and desires instead of our own. Whether you need residential painting for your home or commercial painting for your business, we encourage you to reach out today to speak with our customer service team. Whether you have big ideas about a new paint project or need our expertise and guidance, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

We want to be sure every one of our customers is satisfied, which is why we offer a three-year guaranteed on our labor. If you're in need of an electrician for your home or business, give our office a call and discover the Engineered Electrical Solutions difference.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(843) 420-3029

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Latest News in York, SC

Your Cat Might Not Be Ignoring You When You Speak

Cats have a reputation for being aloof, but a new study has found that their relationships with their owners may be stronger than we thought.Every cat owner has a story to tell of being blanked by their cat: We call to our cat, it turns away, and some of us might be left wondering why we didn’t get a dog. But your cat may be listening after all. More than that, it cares more than you may think.A study by French researchers that was published last month in the journal ...

Cats have a reputation for being aloof, but a new study has found that their relationships with their owners may be stronger than we thought.

Every cat owner has a story to tell of being blanked by their cat: We call to our cat, it turns away, and some of us might be left wondering why we didn’t get a dog. But your cat may be listening after all. More than that, it cares more than you may think.

A study by French researchers that was published last month in the journal Animal Cognition found that not only do cats react to what scientists call cat-directed speech — a high-pitched voice similar to how we talk to babies — they react to who is doing the talking.

“We found that when cats heard their owners using a high-pitched voice, they reacted more than when they heard their owner speaking normally to another human adult,” said Charlotte de Mouzon, an author of the study and cat behavior expert at the Université Paris Nanterre. “But what was very surprising in our results was that it actually didn’t work when it came from a stranger’s voice.”

Unlike with dogs, cat behavior is difficult to study, which is part of why humans understand them less. Cats are often so stressed by being in a lab that meaningful behavioral observations become impossible. And forget about trying to get a cat to sit still for an M.R.I. scan to study its brain function.

So the researchers for the latest study went to the cats’ homes and played recordings of different types of speech and different speakers. At first, Dr. de Mouzon and her team were worried that the cats weren’t reacting at all. But then they studied film recordings of the encounters. “Their reactions were very subtle,” Dr. de Mouzon said. “It could be just moving an ear or turning the head towards the speaker or even freezing what they were doing.”

Better Understand Our Mysterious Feline Friends

In a few cases, the cats in the study would approach the speaker playing a voice and meow. “In the end, we had really clear gains in the cat’s attention when the owner was using cat-directed speech,” Dr. de Mouzon said.

The findings showed that “cats are paying close attention to their caretakers, down to not only what they are saying, but how they are saying it,” said Kristyn Vitale, an assistant professor of animal health and behavior at Unity College in Maine who was not involved in the new study.

The new study complements Dr. Vitale’s own research into relationships between a cat and its owner. This relationship is so important, Dr. Vitale’s research has found, that it replicates the connection between a kitten and its mother. “It is possible that attachment behaviors originally intended for interactions with their mother have now been modified for interactions with their new caretakers, humans.”

Unlike dogs, “most cats actually prefer human interaction over other rewards like food or toys,” Dr. Vitale said.

Genetics may also play a role in why dogs are easier to study and are assumed to be friendlier.

“Dogs were artificially selected hundreds or thousands of years ago based precisely on their capacity to be trained, whether as sheepdogs, hunting dogs or something else,” Sarah Jeannin, a dog behavior expert at the Université Paris Nanterre who was not involved in the new study.

Dr. Jeannin disputed the stereotype that dogs are closer to humans than cats. “People say that dogs are a man’s best friend, that you can trust them and that they are very loyal. But we don’t know what dogs actually think,” she said. “It’s really just projection by us that dogs are in love with us.”

“For years, scientists didn’t ask the right questions about cats,” Dr. de Mouzon said. Now, those who are convinced of the perfidy of cats won’t like the answers that are emerging.

Cats don’t hate us after all, Dr. Vitale said, adding that “a growing body of work supports the idea that social interaction with humans is key in the life of a cat.”

According to Dr. de Mouzon, just because cats react in subtle ways doesn’t mean they are aloof.

“Cats don’t do what you expect them to do. But if cats don’t come when we call them, it may be because they’re busy doing something else, or they are resting,” she said. “People have these kinds of expectations because when you call a dog, the dog will come. But if you call a human when they are having a nap at the other end of the house, would you go?”

Nicole Will Move Up the East Coast, Bringing Heavy Rain

Tropical Storm Nicole, which hit the east coast of Florida as a Category 1 hurricane early Thursday, was expected to bring heavy rain from the Carolinas to New England through the weekend, meteorologists said.After crossing Central Florida on Thursday, Nicole was predicted to emerge over the far northeastern Gulf of Mexico and then move across the Florida Panhandle, according to the National Hurricane Center.Nicole w...

Tropical Storm Nicole, which hit the east coast of Florida as a Category 1 hurricane early Thursday, was expected to bring heavy rain from the Carolinas to New England through the weekend, meteorologists said.

After crossing Central Florida on Thursday, Nicole was predicted to emerge over the far northeastern Gulf of Mexico and then move across the Florida Panhandle, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Nicole will move across Georgia and South Carolina on Friday and then farther north, David Roth, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center, said on Thursday.

As Nicole moves through the Southeast, it’s likely to bring tornadoes across the region.

“A few tornadoes are expected during the day from northern Florida into eastern Georgia and South Carolina, and possibly overnight into southern North Carolina,” according to an update early Thursday from the Storm Prediction Center.

Tornadoes are common in hurricanes and are often relatively weak and short-lived, but they can still pose a significant threat if one strikes a populated area.

“By time we get to Friday night and into Saturday, the low pressure system associated with the storm is expected to be accelerating up the Appalachians,” before reaching New England by Sunday, Mr. Roth said.

While heavy rain and strong winds from Nicole were a concern for many Floridians, other states in the storm’s path will mainly get rain.

Nicole will likely be downgraded to a tropical depression as it moves over Georgia, Mr. Roth said.

“The forecast is for two to four inches, with local amounts of six inches, as it moves through the southeast Appalachians,” he said. Parts of the Northeast and New England could see lower amounts.

Since the storm was expected to be a rain maker, there was a slight risk of excessive rainfall from the Southeast to New York, according to the Weather Prediction Center.

“The worry is that there could be some hourly rain totals of an inch, inch and a half, which over a few hours could overwhelm” urban areas or places with high elevations, Mr. Roth said.

Once the warmer, tropical-like rainy weather from Nicole pushes through the Northeast, a colder air mass will move across the East, dropping high temperatures well below average on Sunday.

Aging mobile home park may be solution for affordable housing in York, SC

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.The proposed project is on ...

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.

The proposed project is on McAfee Court in York, where there are about 40 mobile homes. Virgie Cherry, a resident of 16 years, said she wishes it would be maintained better.

“All this garbage out here," Cherry said. "These people don’t like cleaning yards."

High grass, trash, unpaved roads and some homes on the brink of collapse are just some of the complaints from residents on McAfee Court, many of whom can’t afford to leave the aging mobile home community.

But a new proposal to replace these homes with space for 400 new manufactured homes by Bull Creek LLC is bringing hope to some.

RELATED: 'It's a very difficult market' | Housing program uses incentives for property owners to help make housing more affordable

Richard Gee with Bull Creek LLC said families already living in the community would be the first to get a chance to buy a home and rent land in the new development.

Gee said right now many residents are paying around $1,000 to live here. Under his proposal, the cost for housing would stay under $1,500 a month but with better conditions.

“I can ensure that it’s clean, it’s picked up, it’s safe," Gee said. "Sidewalks, paved roads, streetlights, streetlamps, amenities.”

Most importantly, Gee said it would be affordable -- something that is very much needed in this community.

As more families turn to manufactured homes as a solution for affordable housing, demand has pushed prices up. According to census data, nationally the price of manufactured homes rose by nearly 50% during the pandemic.

Resident Vincent Maloco said he supports the project if it means his family can have a home.

WCNC Charlotte is always asking "where's the money?" If you need help, reach out to WCNC Charlotte by emailing money@wcnc.com.

“A proposal like this one would give 400 families an opportunity to start the American dream," Maloco said.

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

“I think this plan totally fits what we want to see in our backyard as opposed to some of the rundown and dilapidated mobile units that are here now," Roddey said.

The first reading was approved by the county council this week. Council will discuss the project again next month.

Farmland Values Hit Record Highs, Pricing Out Farmers

Small farmers are now going up against deep-pocketed investors, including private equity firms and real estate developers.Joel Gindo thought he could finally own and operate the farm of his dreams when a neighbor put up 160 acres of cropland for sale in Brookings County, S.D., two years ago. Five thousand or six thousand dollars an acre should do the trick, Mr. Gindo estimated.But at auction, Mr. Gindo watched helplessly as the price continued to climb until it hit $11,000 an acre, double what he had budgeted for.“...

Small farmers are now going up against deep-pocketed investors, including private equity firms and real estate developers.

Joel Gindo thought he could finally own and operate the farm of his dreams when a neighbor put up 160 acres of cropland for sale in Brookings County, S.D., two years ago. Five thousand or six thousand dollars an acre should do the trick, Mr. Gindo estimated.

But at auction, Mr. Gindo watched helplessly as the price continued to climb until it hit $11,000 an acre, double what he had budgeted for.

“I just couldn’t compete with how much people are paying, with people paying 10 grand,” he said. “And for someone like me who doesn’t have an inheritance somewhere sitting around, a lump sum of money sitting around, everything has to be financed.”

What is happening in South Dakota is playing out in farming communities across the nation as the value of farmland soars, hitting record highs this year and often pricing out small or beginning farmers. In the state, farmland values surged by 18.7 percent from 2021 to 2022, one of the highest increases in the country, according to the most recent figures from the Agriculture Department. Nationwide, values increased by 12.4 percent and reached $3,800 an acre, the highest on record since 1970, with cropland at $5,050 an acre and pastureland at $1,650 an acre.

A series of economic forces — high prices for commodity crops like corn, soybeans and wheat; a robust housing market; low interest rates until recently; and an abundance of government subsidies — have converged to create a “perfect storm” for farmland values, said Jason Henderson, a dean at the College of Agriculture at Purdue University and a former official at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

As a result, small farmers like Mr. Gindo are now going up against deep-pocketed investors, including private equity firms and real estate developers, prompting some experts to warn of far-reaching consequences for the farming sector.

Young farmers named finding affordable land for purchase the top challenge in 2022 in a September survey by the National Young Farmers Coalition, a nonprofit group.

Already, the supply of land is limited. About 40 percent of farmland in the United States is rented, most of it owned by landlords who are not actively involved in farming. And the amount of land available for purchase is extremely scant, with less than 1 percent of farmland sold on the open market annually.

The booming housing market, among a number of factors, has bolstered the value of farmland, particularly in areas close to growing city centers.

“What we have seen over the past year or two was, when housing starts to go up with new building construction, that puts pressure on farmland, especially on those urban fringes,” Professor Henderson explained. “And that leads to a cascading ripple effect into land values even farther and farther away.”

Government subsidies to farmers have also soared in recent years, amounting to nearly 39 percent of net farm income in 2020. On top of traditional programs like crop insurance payments, the Agriculture Department distributed $23 billion to farmers hurt by President Donald J. Trump’s trade war from 2018 to 2020 and $45.3 billion in pandemic-related assistance in 2020 and 2021. (The government’s contribution to farm income decreased to 20 percent in 2021 and is forecast to be about 8 percent in 2022.)

Those payments, or even the very promise of additional assistance, increase farmland values as they create a safety net and signal that agricultural land is a safe bet, research shows.

“There’s an expectation in the market that the government’s going to play a role when farm incomes drop, so that definitely affects investment behavior,” said Jennifer Ifft, a professor of agricultural economics at Kansas State University.

Eager investors are increasingly turning to farmland in the face of volatility in the stock and real estate markets. Bill Gates, the Microsoft co-founder and a billionaire, is the biggest private farmland owner in the country and recently won approval to buy 2,100 acres in North Dakota for $13.5 million.

The number of private equity funds seeking to buy stakes in farmland has ticked higher, said Tim Koch, a vice president at an agricultural financial cooperative in the Midwest, Farm Credit Services of America. Pension funds also consider farmland a stable investment, Professor Ifft said.

Farmers, too, have witnessed an influx of outside interest. Nathaniel Bankhead, who runs a farm and garden consulting business in Chattanooga, Tenn., has banded with a group of other agricultural workers to save up to $500,000 to buy about 60 acres of land. For months, the collective has been repeatedly outbid by real estate developers, investors looking to diversify their portfolios and urban transplants with “delusional agrarian dreams,” he said.

“Places that I have looked at as potential farmland are being bought up in cash before I can even go through the process that a working-class person has to do to access land,” he said. “And the ironic thing is, those are my clients, like I get hired by them to do as a hobby what I’m trying to do as a livelihood. So it’s tough to watch.”

Mr. Bankhead characterized the current landscape as a form of “digital feudalism” for aspiring working farmers. Wealthy landowners drive up land prices, contract with agricultural designers like himself to enact their vision and then hire a caretaker to work the land — pricing out those very employees from becoming owners themselves.

“They kind of lock that person to this new flavor of serfdom where it’s, you might be decently paid, you’ve got access to it, but it will never be yours,” he said.

Unable to afford land in her native Florida, Tasha Trujillo recently moved her flower farm to South Carolina. Ms. Trujillo had grown cut flowers and kept bees on a parcel of her brother-in-law’s five-acre plant nursery in Redland, a historically agricultural region in the Miami area, about 20 miles south of downtown.

When she sought to expand her farm and buy her own land, she quickly found that prices were out of reach, with real estate developers driving up land values and pushing out agriculture producers.

A five-acre property in the Redlands now costs $500,000 to $700,000, Ms. Trujillo said. “So I essentially didn’t have a choice but to leave Miami and Florida as a whole.”

“Farming is a very stressful profession,” she added. “When you throw in land insecurity, it makes it 20 times worse. So there were many, many times where I thought: ‘Oh my God. I’m not going to be able to do this. This isn’t feasible.’”

As small and beginning farmers are shut out — the latest agricultural census said that the average age of farmers inched up to 57.5 — the prohibitively high land values may have ripple effects on the sector at large.

Brian Philpot, the chief executive of AgAmerica, an agricultural lending institution, said his firm’s average loan size had increased as farms consolidated, squeezing out family farms. This, he argued, could lead to a farm crisis.

“Do we have the skills and the next generation of people to farm it? And two, if the answer is going to be, we’re going to have passive owners own this land and lease it out, is that very sustainable?” he said.

Professor Henderson also warned that current farmers may face increased financial risk as they seek to leverage their high farmland values, essentially betting the farm to expand it.

“They’ll buy more land but they’ll use debt to do it,” he said. “They’ll stretch themselves out.”

Economists and lenders said farmland values appeared to have plateaued in recent months, as the Federal Reserve raised interest rates and the cost of fertilizer and diesel soared. But with high commodity prices forecast for next year, some believe values will remain high.

A native of Tanzania who moved to South Dakota about a decade ago, Mr. Gindo bought seven acres of land to raise livestock in 2019 and currently rents an additional 40 acres to grow corn and soybeans — all the while working full time as a comptroller to make ends meet.

For now, he has cooled off his search for a farm of his own even as he dreams of passing on that land to his son. The more immediate concern, he said, was whether his landlord would raise his rent. So far, the landlord has refrained because Mr. Gindo helps him out around the farm.

“He really doesn’t have to lend me his land,” Mr. Gindo said. “He can make double that with someone else.”

In Florida, Ms. Trujillo said, the owner of the land where her brother-in-law’s nursery sits has spoken of selling the plot while prices remain high, so he too has begun looking for his own property.

“That’s a big fear for a lot of these farmers and nursery owners who are renting land, because you just never know when the owner’s just going to say: ‘You know what? This year, I’m selling and you’ve got to go,’” she said.

In Tennessee, Mr. Bankhead said he considered giving up on owning a farm “multiple times a day” as friends who have been longtime farmers leave the profession.

But so far, he remains committed to staying in the field and doing “the work of trying to keep land in families’ hands and showing there’s more to do with this land than to sell it to real estate developers,” he said. “But the pain of not having my own garden and not being able to have my animals where I live, it never stings any less.”

Here’s the latest on more than 1,000 new homes planned in York and Lancaster counties

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.Projects include:? Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision...

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.

Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.

Projects include:

? Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision at Sixth Baxter Crossing and Hugh Street, near North Sutton Road. The property is almost 3 acres. The plan involves 20 townhomes.

The Borough at Sixth Baxter is, according to county information sent to the planning commission, the last lot in Baxter Village to be sold by Clear Springs Baxter. The property is near both residential and commercial space, including an urgent care site.

? The Bull Creek project in York is back up for county review. County planning staff recommends against the plan for a 409-lot manufactured home community at 975 McAfee Court. County planning staff doesn’t believe that scale of development is consistent with residential and agricultural uses in that area now, according to informtion sent to the planning commission. The 155-acre property has 62 mobile homes on it now.

? Owners of 14 acres on Saluda Street in Rock Hill applied to rezone the property to allow a new 11-home subdivision. There are five manufactured homes there, plus wooded and grassy areas. A sketch plan shows all 11 lots off a single entrance from Saluda, which leads to a cul-de-sac.

The property is east of Ogden Farms and south of Cedarbrook, between Porter Black Road and Autumnwood Drive.

? Almost 200 more homes are still planned, but could come later than was laid out in a prior county approval. Fielding Homes got county approval to build four new phases of Paddlers Cove in Lake Wylie. The 135-acre new portion of the existing subdivision is set for 195 homes.

County approvals typically come with two-year vested rights. Developers have to request annual extensions if they don’t start until after the vested rights period ends. Developers get up to five such extensions. The owner asks the county now for an extension to run through March 2023.

The Lancaster County planning commission met Thursday night. The commission recommended a zoning change for almost 44 acres that would allow a new home subdivision. Lancaster County Council will make the final decision.

The property on the southeast corner of Fork Hill Road and Little Dude Avenue is owned by R&C Investments. Earl Coulston applied for the zoning change. The site is just north of Kershaw, about a mile west of Haile Gold Mine.

Dale Robertson is a partner with R&C Investments. Robertson has done other residential projects in that area, with the mine in mind.

“There’s just a lot of people that are driving an hour and fifteen minutes, some of them two hours, to work,” Robertson told the planning commission Thursday. “There’s hardly no houses down there for people to buy.”

A plan with an exact number of new homes hasn’t been submitted, but the new zoning would allow up to 2.5 homes per acre. Or, roughly 110 homes for a property that size.

An even larger project was on the planning commission agenda Thursday, but was deferred until next month. Rezoning and a development agreement are proposed for Arbor Walk. That new home subdivision could have 233 homes on almost 113 acres on Vance Baker Road.

The planning commission in Rock Hill met Tuesday, where one of several property proposals was the Arbors at Seven Oaks project. Owner Rock Hill Multifamily Investments applied for preliminary plat approval on Springsteen Road and Evelyn Street. There are three parcels, two in front of the Seven Oaks subdivivision and the other with a pond on Evelyn.

Plans show 148 townhomes proposed on 21 acres. The site was approved for 220 apartments in 2014. Plans have changed and been pushed back several times due to utility and other negotiations.

Several road upgrades are part of the plan. Access to the site southwest of Seven Oaks Boulevard will come from a new driveway connection to Springsteen. The area northeast of Seven Oaks Boulevard will have a new drive onto Springsteen and and another onto Evelyn, across from Wildwood Drive. A left turn lane on Springsteen at Evelyn will be added, and the intersection will be realigned. Springsteen also will be widened to create a center turn lane.

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